CatherineLiu22
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How is it like to study BMS? Is it an interesting and thrilling or a boring subject? Is it difficult for study as well as the research, experiences and projects? Give me your experiences please...
And also, what kind of careers can you have if you got a bachelor degree of BMS?
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University of Bradford
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(Original post by CatherineLiu22)
How is it like to study BMS? Is it an interesting and thrilling or a boring subject? Is it difficult for study as well as the research, experiences and projects? Give me your experiences please...
And also, what kind of careers can you have if you got a bachelor degree of BMS?
Hey @CatherineLiu22

How are you? Are you still thinking about studying Biomedical Science?

I think it'd be a good idea for you to chat to some current Biomedical Science students directly about their experiences of the course and if they find any aspects particularly difficult. You can chat to some of our students online if you'd like here.

I thought you might find the following student stories useful as well:
This is where I found my passion for research
This is where I found my confidence
This is where I found my career path

Where Biomedical Sciences can take you
Graduates have options to continue in education or research, or pursue a career in specialist healthcare science sectors. Some roles our recent grads have taken include: Biomedical Scientist, Clinical Trials Assistant, Healthcare Technical Officer, Medical Lab Assistant, Laboratory Technician, Teacher, Research Assistant, Micro Analyst.

I hope this helped, please let me know if you have any further questions or any you'd like me to pass on to the course leaders

Good luck with whatever course and uni you decide to choose!

Becky
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RegisteredBMS
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(Original post by University of Bradford)
Hey @CatherineLiu22

How are you? Are you still thinking about studying Biomedical Science?

I think it'd be a good idea for you to chat to some current Biomedical Science students directly about their experiences of the course and if they find any aspects particularly difficult. You can chat to some of our students online if you'd like here.

I thought you might find the following student stories useful as well:
This is where I found my passion for research
This is where I found my confidence
This is where I found my career path

Where Biomedical Sciences can take you
Graduates have options to continue in education or research, or pursue a career in specialist healthcare science sectors. Some roles our recent grads have taken include: Biomedical Scientist, Clinical Trials Assistant, Healthcare Technical Officer, Medical Lab Assistant, Laboratory Technician, Teacher, Research Assistant, Micro Analyst.

I hope this helped, please let me know if you have any further questions or any you'd like me to pass on to the course leaders

Good luck with whatever course and uni you decide to choose!

Becky
I'd just like to add to this as this is misinformation that I actually flagged up with the Faculty at UOB several years ago.

Advising that you can graduate from a Biomedical Science course, especially the one at UoB which doesn't allow the option to do a sandwich placement, and become a Biomedical Scientist is misinformation. It's also very poor when you offer BSc Healthcare Science (Life Science) which is the most direct route to become a Biomedical Scientist that is in existant.

If you want to become a Biomedical Scientist, I would say outright that you should NOT be studying Biomedical Science at UoB, they offer a far better option.
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nousernameplease
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#4
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#4
(Original post by CatherineLiu22)
How is it like to study BMS? Is it an interesting and thrilling or a boring subject? Is it difficult for study as well as the research, experiences and projects? Give me your experiences please...
And also, what kind of careers can you have if you got a bachelor degree of BMS?
Hi!
I'm a final year biomed so I hope I can be useful! First off, every university is different with how they structure their course, the content, the freedom to choose modules and importantly, whether the degree is accredited by the institute of biomedical science. That last part is only important if you think you might want to go on to work in pathology labs to analyse patient samples to diagnose disease, so if that is definitely not what you want to do, then you can ignore it, but if it's even possibly on the cards, its worth considering. My course is IBMS accredited but just because it is doesn't mean it entirely focuses on diagnostic techniques, I've covered so many aspects of human biology and health and disease and have been able to choose modules that interest me.
How difficult it is is entirely personal, its based on your current understanding, how much work you're willing to put in, how you think and also how your course is structured and assesses you. Even then, everyone on the same course has a different experience.
As with any course, there are aspects you will find super interesting and some modules you don't want to take but have to because they are compulsory for that course. It's worth looking at each university and comparing their modules that they currently run, but be aware these might change by the time you get there.
I go to Keele, and this is a run down of my experience:
Year 1 was really just a learn how to be a student year. You just have to pass, and I'd say 50% of the content was content I'd covered in a-levels. I had exams and some assignments, with a lot of lab work to practise concepts learnt in lectures and learn important lab technique. I didn't have any optional modules that year, but that doesn't mean it won't change
Year 2 was definitely a step up from first year, with lots of optional modules so you could really choose what most interested you. Of course my experience was different because of the pandemic, so my lab sessions were much more limited than normal, but I think in normal times second year continues to have a lot of lab sessions. The content was a lot more detailed and I feel like I had a lot more assignments but the lecture content was adapted to have time to do this. There was also a greater emphasis on further reading to go beyond the lecture content. Again, it was assessed through a combination of assignments (essays, proformas, presentations, posters, leaflets) and exams.
Year 3 has been a beast but that is true for any course. There have been a couple compulsory modules but there is little teaching, as this year focuses on independent study. I've had a 9,000 word lab project, a 5,000 word essay, presentations, and smaller structured assignments in the optional modules. This is the year with the most freedom in not only what modules you study, but what your final project and essay are on.
As far as I can tell, my course is unique with those 2 big assignments in third year, but it's all manageable and teaches you loads of scientific and professional skills.
One of the first things they'll say at an open day event for BMS courses is the huge variety of career opportunities. If you aren't too sure what you want to do after uni (as most people don't), I'd say BMS is a really safe degree if you know you enjoy studying human biology and disease. It's the only course from which you can work as a registered BMS in an NHS lab, it provides a good background if you want to do graduate medicine, you can go on to research, medical sales, science communication, the NHS scientist training porgramme, pharmaceuticals, the list goes on.
I never intended to study BMS (didn't get the grades for medicine), but I'm so glad I fell into this course.
Let me know if you have any other questions, I'd love to answer them
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RegisteredBMS
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#5
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#5
(Original post by nousernameplease)
One of the first things they'll say at an open day event for BMS courses is the huge variety of career opportunities. If you aren't too sure what you want to do after uni (as most people don't), I'd say BMS is a really safe degree if you know you enjoy studying human biology and disease. It's the only course from which you can work as a registered BMS in an NHS lab, it provides a good background if you want to do graduate medicine, you can go on to research, medical sales, science communication, the NHS scientist training porgramme, pharmaceuticals, the list goes on.
I never intended to study BMS (didn't get the grades for medicine), but I'm so glad I fell into this course.
Let me know if you have any other questions, I'd love to answer them
The boldened part is untrue. In fact it's not even the most direct or fastest route to being a BMS, as that title falls to BSc Healthcare Science (Life Science).
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