The Student Room Group

Why don't more people do degree apprenticeships?

I am a student in year 12 and I have been looking at many degree apprenticeships in finance. I am predicted around 3 or 4 a stars but I'm not sure if I should apply for uni or not since there seems to be so many benefits of doing degree apprenticeships. No debt, you get to earn a wage, you get loads of experience and a full time job at the end of it. Why do degree apprenticeships have so low entry requirements compared to the top unis when it seems as though they are better? Am I missing some big disadvantage of doing a degree apprenticeship????
Reply 1
Original post by Michael G Scott
I am a student in year 12 and I have been looking at many degree apprenticeships in finance. I am predicted around 3 or 4 a stars but I'm not sure if I should apply for uni or not since there seems to be so many benefits of doing degree apprenticeships. No debt, you get to earn a wage, you get loads of experience and a full time job at the end of it. Why do degree apprenticeships have so low entry requirements compared to the top unis when it seems as though they are better? Am I missing some big disadvantage of doing a degree apprenticeship????

It’s a lot of work. You’re working full time and doing a degree on top of that. There’s also a risk of missing out on the social life uni is known for.

Degree apprenticeships can be/are very specific so people who don’t know what they want to do (which is most people at 16-18) will be taking a bigger risk by doing one than if they went to uni. Uni degrees tend to be broader.

The salary of some degree apprenticeships are a joke especially if you have to relocate.

Depending on where you live they can be hard to find locally. A lot of people on degree apprenticeships stay home which limits them to a certain area. Those who move have to find ones with a salary that they can live on (and those tend to be the most competitive).

The entry requirements is likely cuz of the skills involved. Getting an A* in maths doesn’t mean you’ll be good at client-facing work or collaboration etc. There’s this idea that they’re for “dumb” people but it’s just to lower the bar of entry so they attract people who have skills that aren’t solely academic.

Also you’re not always guaranteed a job afterwards.
(edited 2 years ago)
Original post by Michael G Scott
I am a student in year 12 and I have been looking at many degree apprenticeships in finance. I am predicted around 3 or 4 a stars but I'm not sure if I should apply for uni or not since there seems to be so many benefits of doing degree apprenticeships. No debt, you get to earn a wage, you get loads of experience and a full time job at the end of it. Why do degree apprenticeships have so low entry requirements compared to the top unis when it seems as though they are better? Am I missing some big disadvantage of doing a degree apprenticeship????

Much harder to get into. Usually, you are faced with a barrage of video interviews/assessment centres/tests - far easier to just pay UCAS £25 or whatever. Some people don't want to relocate either. Some people go to university for the so-called "experience" as well.

Still, I'd do a degree apprenticeship if I had my time again.
(edited 2 years ago)
Original post by Michael G Scott
I am a student in year 12 and I have been looking at many degree apprenticeships in finance. I am predicted around 3 or 4 a stars but I'm not sure if I should apply for uni or not since there seems to be so many benefits of doing degree apprenticeships. No debt, you get to earn a wage, you get loads of experience and a full time job at the end of it. Why do degree apprenticeships have so low entry requirements compared to the top unis when it seems as though they are better? Am I missing some big disadvantage of doing a degree apprenticeship????

The entry requirements are lower because they are looking for more than grades. They are looking for potential, aptitude and enthusiasm. Being a good student doesn't mean you will be a good employee. The companies generally use the grade entry requirements of the university that they are partnered with.

What you will also find is that apprenticeships (particularly degree apprenticeships and even more so finance/tech/engineering apprenticeships) are ridiculously competitive. My apprenticeship scheme (degree, software, large company, outside London) had 500+ applicants to 5 places. I would not be surprised if the best London apprenticeship schemes received 500+ applicants per position.

In addition, degree apprenticeships are relatively new things. Most people feel comfortable taking the road more often travelled and hence avoid apprenticeship schemes. Obviously, there are other reasons uni is chosen over degree apprenticeships but I believe this is quite common.
I know I'm a bit late in replying but I am a Degree Apprentice (Digital Technology Solutions). I live fairly locally to where I work and the salary is virtually all put into savings apart from the usual expenses (i.e car insurance, going out with friends etc.). I would say try to find one locally so you don't have to move.

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