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Durham vs Bristol vs Warwick

I’m a prospective international undergraduate student looking to pursue my studies in the uk, presently I hold conditional offers for politics and international relations(BSc,BA) from the university of Bristol, Durham and Warwick. My top priorities are prestige, graduate prospects and academics; which should I choose?

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Original post by Alan soby
I’m a prospective international undergraduate student looking to pursue my studies in the uk, presently I hold conditional offers for politics and international relations(BSc,BA) from the university of Bristol, Durham and Warwick. My top priorities are prestige, graduate prospects and academics; which should I choose?

Personal Preference I would say.
Durham is the most prestigious, followed by Warwick and Bristol.
Durham is up north so it’s typically cheaper to live, Warwick is more so Midlands and Bristol in the south.

However, Bristol seems to have a better social life.
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Reply 2
Thanks you so much for your answer! but how would these unis compare in terms of graduate prospects or employability and how strong would you say are their politics departments
Original post by Alan soby
Thanks you so much for your answer! but how would these unis compare in terms of graduate prospects or employability and how strong would you say are their politics departments

Honestly. They all have amazing graduate prospects and employability. They’re all amazing. Personally, for politics I would suggest looking into London Unis
Original post by Alan soby
I’m a prospective international undergraduate student looking to pursue my studies in the uk, presently I hold conditional offers for politics and international relations(BSc,BA) from the university of Bristol, Durham and Warwick. My top priorities are prestige, graduate prospects and academics; which should I choose?

As far as I know, Warwick has the highest regarded politics department out of the three (but I am unaware to what extent that makes a difference). Warwick and Durham are basically equal in general prestige and Bristol isn't that much less prestigious so it's probably best to decide best on location, costs etc. Bristol is a very different experience to Durham and espeically Warwick considering the size of Bristol. Bristol uni feels like a university in a big city, whilst Durham feels like a university town and warwick feels like a self contained University. I currently study at Warwick so I would be happy to answer any questions (although I study Maths, not Politics). I was also deciding between Warwick and Durham when I applied last year.
Reply 5
Ooh, ok. Apart from these three I applied to two London unis-king’s and LSE and got a conditional offer from King’s for international relations but haven’t heard back from LSE yet. I would love to study in London but my main issue is the exorbitant living costs, so frankly speaking would it be worth sustaining the higher living costs to study politics at King’s or LSE(hopefully) instead of choosing Durham or Warwick
Original post by Alan soby
I’m a prospective international undergraduate student looking to pursue my studies in the uk, presently I hold conditional offers for politics and international relations(BSc,BA) from the university of Bristol, Durham and Warwick. My top priorities are prestige, graduate prospects and academics; which should I choose?


Original post by Alan soby
Ooh, ok. Apart from these three I applied to two London unis-king’s and LSE and got a conditional offer from King’s for international relations but haven’t heard back from LSE yet. I would love to study in London but my main issue is the exorbitant living costs, so frankly speaking would it be worth sustaining the higher living costs to study politics at King’s or LSE(hopefully) instead of choosing Durham or Warwick

Hey there @Alan soby. Glad to know you got an offer from Durham!

In terms of your priorities, all three universities are amazing although I might be more biased towards Durham because of the great experiences I've had here. There's a whole range of module choices you can pick from and tailor your course to fit your interests and the lecturers are all very helpful and welcoming. You get exposure to our staff's research in this field in your 2nd and 3rd year modules so that's very interesting. There's also an opportunity to get a work placement if you want some experience between your penultimate and final years!

As for the living costs, I agree that London is very expensive and it's one of the reasons I didn't prefer it myself. Social life is flamboyant at Durham because of the collegiate system and a wide variety of societies to join. I'm not an outgoing person at all but seeing people enjoying their time here makes me want to go out too!

All in all, Durham is a popular choice for the course you've chosen and hopefully you can decide which university suits you. Let me know if you have more questions :wink:

-Himieka (Official DU Rep)
Reply 8
Thank you all for your insights and help but things just got more complicated, i recently got an offer from LSE for politics and international relations (BSc) and its reputation globally and nationally especially for politics is exemplary, would any of you share your insight on how better LSE is for politics(if it is) and if it is worth sustaining the London living costs.

I’m also considering doing a law conversion GDL course after graduation and for that I need to apply for internships in first or second year so that i hopefully get a training contract at law firms(elite US or magic circle).
So in total I got offers from King’s, LSE, Warwick, Bristol and Durham all for politics and international relations. Among these which all universities attract the top law firms while still maintaining a great politics department ?
I know this question has been way too complicated and prolix but believe me I have made it as succinct as I could, It would mean the world to me if any of you took the time to answer this!
Original post by Alan soby
Thank you all for your insights and help but things just got more complicated, i recently got an offer from LSE for politics and international relations (BSc) and its reputation globally and nationally especially for politics is exemplary

Consequently its stuffed full with Interantional students, especially Chinese.
Nothing wrong with this of course but it may impact on your 'student experience'.

"The LSE depends on foreign students, who count for 68% of those at the university (some 11% of the total number are Chinese)." https://www.economist.com/britain/2019/04/13/a-cartographic-clash-between-the-lse-and-its-chinese-students
(edited 2 years ago)
Original post by Alan soby
Thank you all for your insights and help but things just got more complicated, i recently got an offer from LSE for politics and international relations (BSc) and its reputation globally and nationally especially for politics is exemplary, would any of you share your insight on how better LSE is for politics(if it is) and if it is worth sustaining the London living costs.

I’m also considering doing a law conversion GDL course after graduation and for that I need to apply for internships in first or second year so that i hopefully get a training contract at law firms(elite US or magic circle).
So in total I got offers from King’s, LSE, Warwick, Bristol and Durham all for politics and international relations. Among these which all universities attract the top law firms while still maintaining a great politics department ?
I know this question has been way too complicated and prolix but believe me I have made it as succinct as I could, It would mean the world to me if any of you took the time to answer this!

Not complicated at all. LSE is the answer. Congratulations.
Original post by Alan soby
I’m a prospective international undergraduate student looking to pursue my studies in the uk, presently I hold conditional offers for politics and international relations(BSc,BA) from the university of Bristol, Durham and Warwick. My top priorities are prestige, graduate prospects and academics; which should I choose?


For prestige, graduate prospects and academics, all 3 are virtually on par.

It would be like splitting hairs.

For Politics: Warwick > Durham > Bristol.

Just notice you also got offers from LSE and KCL. Then as for prestige, graduate prospects and academics, it is:

LSE > KCL > Warwick=Durham=Bristol

It now depends on you financial muscle and which type of setting you feel you would want and enjoy.
LSE, Warwick, Durham, Bristol, KCL. Especially for IB.
Original post by Anonymous
LSE, Warwick, Durham, Bristol, KCL. Especially for IB.

This is not an IB thread, the subject to be studied is not particularly related to IB and the OP is not saying he or she is interested in IB.

As a matter of fact, the OP clearly says he or she plans to do the Law conversion via the GDL course.

So your post is really as useful as listing the most prestigious university, out of the five universities, for Poetry.

I guess there is a reason you chose to post anonymously.

I can bet it is because you are a Warwick student.

Those are the students that really love to always refer to "IB, IB, IB, IB, IB, IB" to inflate, and justify the inflation of, the prestige of Warwick.
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by RoyalBeams
This is not an IB thread, the subject to be studied is not particularly related to IB and the OP is not saying he or she is interested in IB.

As a matter of fact, the OP clear says he or she plans to do the Law conversion via the GDL course.

So you post is as useful as listing the most prestigious university out of the five universities for Poetry.

I guess there is a reason you chose to post anonymously.

I can bet it is because you are a Warwick student.

Those are the students that love to always refer to "IB, IB, IB, IB, IB, IB" to inflate, and justify the inflation of, the prestige of Warwick.

Can you please calm down? I am sorry if a Warwick student hurt you, but I don't think it's fair to accuse me of being one as though I'm a witch. I just wanted to mention that if they're also considering IB then that would be the order but yes, I completely understand that they want to get into law. Since they've got an offer from LSE, a very IB-focused university, I wouldn't be surprised if they decided to want to go into IB, it's not unheard of at LSE.
Original post by Anonymous
Can you please calm down? I am sorry if a Warwick student hurt you, but I don't think it's fair to accuse me of being one as though I'm a witch. I just wanted to mention that if they're also considering IB then that would be the order but yes, I completely understand that they want to get into law. Since they've got an offer from LSE, a very IB-focused university, I wouldn't be surprised if they decided to want to go into IB, it's not unheard of at LSE.

I am pretty sure you are a Warwick student, that is why you [un]necessarily went Anon to hide it.

It was completely unnecessary to highlight IB rankings "just in case" the person, who wants to convert to Law, "changes their mind". You could as well have speculated they would change their mind to Poetry.

And don't justify your attempt with "LSE is IB-focused"; LSE produces far more political people than bankers. And its production of lawyers would not be that much far off its production of bankers. It is not IB-focused!
Original post by RoyalBeams
I am pretty sure you are a Warwick student, that is why you [un]necessarily went Anon to hide it.

It was completely unnecessary to highlight IB rankings "just in case" the person, who wants to convert to Law, "changes their mind". You could as well have speculated they would change their mind to Poetry.

And don't justify your attempt with "LSE is IB-focused"; LSE produces far more political people than bankers. And its production of lawyers would not be that much far off its production of bankers. It is not IB-focused!

https://info.lse.ac.uk/current-students/careers/what-graduates-do
For all graduating years, 29.5% of all undergraduates at LSE went into financial and professional services, additionally, 11.7% went into accounting and auditing and 10.2% in consulting. However, only 7.6% went into law and legal services. For the Top 20 employers that LSE graduates work for, 8 investment banks make the list whereas only one law firm, Latham & Watkins LLB, is present. Do with that what you will.
Original post by Anonymous
https://info.lse.ac.uk/current-students/careers/what-graduates-do
For all graduating years, 29.5% of all undergraduates at LSE went into financial and professional services, additionally, 11.7% went into accounting and auditing and 10.2% in consulting. However, only 7.6% went into law and legal services. For the Top 20 employers that LSE graduates work for, 8 investment banks make the list whereas only one law firm, Latham & Watkins LLB, is present. Do with that what you will.

First of all, I have to correct you that the link stated 19.5% went into Financial and Professional Services, not 29.5%. And it was only 7.9% that went into Accounting and Auditing, not 11.7%. Also, Law and Legal Services was 5.5%, not 7.6%.

Secondly, you need to realise that Financial Services is not only IB. It includes Normal Banking (aka Retail and Commercial), Insurance, Mortgage Provision, Asset Management, Loan and Credit Provision (e.g credit card companies) etc. So this 19.5%, by no means, represents IB; more so when it is lumped with whatever they labeled as "Professional Services".

Thirdly, if you go down the info, you will see that less than, or about, 6% go to companies that are known for IBs. Probably not all would be IBers too.

Fourthly, you failed to note that the same link states that 10.7% went into government, public sector and policy.

So, here are some facts based on those data:

- A university where less than 6% go into IB cannot be labelled an IB-focused university.
- More of LSE students go into Teaching & Academia (11.7%), Consulting (11.2%), Government, Public Sector & Policy (10.7%) and Accounting & Auditing (7.9%).
- At 5.5%, LSE produces almost as much lawyers as IBers of 6%.

These facts back up my statement that "LSE produces far more political people than bankers. And its production of lawyers would not be that much far off its production of bankers. It is not IB-focused!".
Original post by RoyalBeams
First of all, I have to correct you that the link stated 19.5% went into Financial and Professional Services, not 29.5%. And it was only 7.9% that went into Accounting and Auditing, not 11.7%. Also, Law and Legal Services was 5.5%, not 7.6%.

Secondly, you need to realise that Financial Services is not only IB. It includes Normal Banking (aka Retail and Commercial), Insurance, Mortgage Provision, Asset Management, Loan and Credit Provision (e.g credit card companies) etc. So this 19.5%, by no means, represents IB; more so when it is lumped with whatever they labeled as "Professional Services".

Thirdly, if you go down the info, you will see that less than, or about, 6% go to companies that are known for IBs. Probably not all would be IBers too.

Fourthly, you failed to note that the same link states that 10.7% went into government, public sector and policy.

So, here are some facts based on those data:

- A university where less than 6% go into IB cannot be labelled an IB-focused university.
- More of LSE students go into Teaching & Academia (11.7%), Consulting (11.2%), Government, Public Sector & Policy (10.7%) and Accounting & Auditing (7.9%).
- At 5.5%, LSE produces almost as much lawyers as IBers of 6%.

These facts back up my statement that "LSE produces far more political people than bankers. And its production of lawyers would not be that much far off its production of bankers. It is not IB-focused!".

You forgot to filter. I did say for ALL graduating years. Either way, no, I'm not a Warwick student, I have no idea what you have against them lol but leave me out of that.
Original post by RoyalBeams
First of all, I have to correct you that the link stated 19.5% went into Financial and Professional Services, not 29.5%. And it was only 7.9% that went into Accounting and Auditing, not 11.7%. Also, Law and Legal Services was 5.5%, not 7.6%.

Secondly, you need to realise that Financial Services is not only IB. It includes Normal Banking (aka Retail and Commercial), Insurance, Mortgage Provision, Asset Management, Loan and Credit Provision (e.g credit card companies) etc. So this 19.5%, by no means, represents IB; more so when it is lumped with whatever they labeled as "Professional Services".

Thirdly, if you go down the info, you will see that less than, or about, 6% go to companies that are known for IBs. Probably not all would be IBers too.

Fourthly, you failed to note that the same link states that 10.7% went into government, public sector and policy.

So, here are some facts based on those data:

- A university where less than 6% go into IB cannot be labelled an IB-focused university.
- More of LSE students go into Teaching & Academia (11.7%), Consulting (11.2%), Government, Public Sector & Policy (10.7%) and Accounting & Auditing (7.9%).
- At 5.5%, LSE produces almost as much lawyers as IBers of 6%.

These facts back up my statement that "LSE produces far more political people than bankers. And its production of lawyers would not be that much far off its production of bankers. It is not IB-focused!".

You forgot that to filter out Postgraduates and only focus on Undergraduates. :/

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