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Economics and History at Oxford or Politics and History/Economics at Cambridge?

So I took my A-Levels last year, and I got two A*s (Politics and History) and an A (Economics). I took a gap year due to the pandemic and will be applying for 2023 entry.
I am interested in becoming a barrister, but am reluctant to do a law degree; given how competitive pupilages are, having a law degree is no guarantee of having a law career. So I would like to take a degree with broader application and potentially undergo a conversion course after graduation. Not to mention very few law students get a first. My reasoning is that even if I cannot get a pupilage or place at the Inns, a degree in economics or politics could open doors for civil service or policy jobs.

Unfortunately, I cannot apply to both Oxford and Cambridge. I am interested in the Economics and History course at Oxford which is not available at Cambridge. However, it seems to me that Cambridge's economics course is heavily grounded in history. Whilst the website says that Alevels in mathematics are required, the admissions director at the relevant college told me that economics A-levels are occasionally accepted in lieu of mathematics.
Cambridge also offers a History and Politics subject, which I may have better chances of admission.

In short, I am very interested in economics and politics, although I would prefer if such courses are grounded in historical context rather than quantitative theory. In what ways is the economics education different at Cambridge than Oxford? What about history? Would I get enough history out of an economics degree at Cambridge? It seems as such given what I saw on the outline.
(edited 2 years ago)
If you’re applying for September 2022 entry, you’re too late unfortunately. The UCAS deadline for Oxbridge was 4 months ago, and the normal equal consideration deadline was last month. You can still apply to other, non-Oxbridge universities but it is up to them whether to consider your application or not. Definitely call their admissions teams to find out before you apply anywhere
Reply 2
Original post by abbie-0525
If you’re applying for September 2022 entry, you’re too late unfortunately. The UCAS deadline for Oxbridge was 4 months ago, and the normal equal consideration deadline was last month. You can still apply to other, non-Oxbridge universities but it is up to them whether to consider your application or not. Definitely call their admissions teams to find out before you apply anywhere

I am actually applying for 2023. I have edited accordingly.
Original post by P.G. W
So I took my A-Levels last year, and I got two A*s (Politics and History) and an A (Economics). I took a gap year due to the pandemic and will be applying for 2023 entry.
I am interested in becoming a barrister, but am reluctant to do a law degree; given how competitive pupilages are, having a law degree is no guarantee of having a law career. So I would like to take a degree with broader application and potentially undergo a conversion course after graduation. Not to mention very few law students get a first. My reasoning is that even if I cannot get a pupilage or place at the Inns, a degree in economics or politics could open doors for civil service or policy jobs.

Unfortunately, I cannot apply to both Oxford and Cambridge. I am interested in the Economics and History course at Oxford which is not available at Cambridge. However, it seems to me that Cambridge's economics course is heavily grounded in history. Whilst the website says that Alevels in mathematics are required, the admissions director at the relevant college told me that economics A-levels are occasionally accepted in lieu of mathematics.
Cambridge also offers a History and Politics subject, which I may have better chances of admission.

In short, I am very interested in economics and politics, although I would prefer if such courses are grounded in historical context rather than quantitative theory. In what ways is the economics education different at Cambridge than Oxford? What about history? Would I get enough history out of an economics degree at Cambridge? It seems as such given what I saw on the outline.


The history and politics degree at Cambridge or PPE at Oxford may be better for you because the economics degree at Cambridge is heavily mathematical, maths is required and further maths is heavily encouraged (unless your school doesn’t offer it). It’s basically an applied maths degree with one compulsory history and politics paper in first year. So it’s not as grounded in history or politics as you’d like

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