how do neurone cells manufacture, transport and release neurotransmitters in a synaps

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cherryhitchkins
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how do neurone cells manufacture, transport and release neurotransmitters in a synapse??

Can someone give me like key ideas for this question please
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Ira :)
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(Original post by cherryhitchkins)
how do neurone cells manufacture, transport and release neurotransmitters in a synapse??

Can someone give me like key ideas for this question please
Sure! Essentially, the neurotransmitters are chemical substances. So, they are effectively only in the neurone to transport the impulse (electrical impulse). They're made in the cell body btw. So they are transported in vesicles, which are basically vacuoles (spaces in the cell) to the cell membrane at the end of the first neurone. Then they are released from the vesicle into the synapse, which is nothing but a gap between two neurones The neurotransmitters diffuse across the synapse to the beginning of the next neurone, where there are protein receptor molecules. Since the neurotransmitters are proteins, and well, there's a "protein receptor" molecule, they bind, a bit like enzymes in a substrate. Anyway, after they bind, the impulse is transmitted to the protein receptor cell, which moves on in the neurotransmitter of the next neurone cell. Hope this helps! It is a bit confusing, but maybe this diagram will help?
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cherryhitchkins
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(Original post by Ira :))
Sure! Essentially, the neurotransmitters are chemical substances. So, they are effectively only in the neurone to transport the impulse (electrical impulse). They're made in the cell body btw. So they are transported in vesicles, which are basically vacuoles (spaces in the cell) to the cell membrane at the end of the first neurone. Then they are released from the vesicle into the synapse, which is nothing but a gap between two neurones The neurotransmitters diffuse across the synapse to the beginning of the next neurone, where there are protein receptor molecules. Since the neurotransmitters are proteins, and well, there's a "protein receptor" molecule, they bind, a bit like enzymes in a substrate. Anyway, after they bind, the impulse is transmitted to the protein receptor cell, which moves on in the neurotransmitter of the next neurone cell. Hope this helps! It is a bit confusing, but maybe this diagram will help?
thank you sooooo much
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zuzannasendor18
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(Original post by Ira :))
Sure! Essentially, the neurotransmitters are chemical substances. So, they are effectively only in the neurone to transport the impulse (electrical impulse). They're made in the cell body btw. So they are transported in vesicles, which are basically vacuoles (spaces in the cell) to the cell membrane at the end of the first neurone. Then they are released from the vesicle into the synapse, which is nothing but a gap between two neurones The neurotransmitters diffuse across the synapse to the beginning of the next neurone, where there are protein receptor molecules. Since the neurotransmitters are proteins, and well, there's a "protein receptor" molecule, they bind, a bit like enzymes in a substrate. Anyway, after they bind, the impulse is transmitted to the protein receptor cell, which moves on in the neurotransmitter of the next neurone cell. Hope this helps! It is a bit confusing, but maybe this diagram will help?
Is it just the process of neurotransmitter you need to write about for the question??
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Ira :)
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(Original post by cherryhitchkins)
thank you sooooo much
Sure
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Ira :)
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(Original post by zuzannasendor18)
Is it just the process of neurotransmitter you need to write about for the question??
In this question, that seems to be all they're asking for. Considering that you're writing about neurone cells in the synapse with reference to the neurotransmitter, you just need to cover all those points about the synapse which are about neurotransmitters. That's it
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