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A level RS- Miracles

So this week, I've been learning about Hume and Wiles' views on miracles, and I understand both of their views, I just don't understand how Hume is classed as a Realist, if he believes that miracles are impossible, due to the probabilities. If anyone could explain how he is a realist, that would be great!
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Original post by Grace Appleby
So this week, I've been learning about Hume and Wiles' views on miracles, and I understand both of their views, I just don't understand how Hume is classed as a Realist, if he believes that miracles are impossible, due to the probabilities. If anyone could explain how he is a realist, that would be great!

The realist/anti-realist distinction is about the definition of a miracle, not about whether they exist.

Realist = miracles defined as objective events happening in reality. Hume then has arguments attempting to show that we have no justification for belief in miracles happening in reality. He is therefore clearly arguing against miracles with a realist definition of miracles in mind.

It's a bit too strong to say Hume thought miracles were 'impossible', he just thought that there was a very high bar level of evidence required.

Anti-realism is the view that miracles are defined as subjective events. Their objectivity is not commented on since that is thought to be beyond human understanding. This is neither the claim that miracles exist objectively, nor the claim that they do not exist objectively. We just can't know and shouldn't try to understand miracles as objective.
(edited 2 years ago)

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