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Oxford Econ and Management

Hi guys, I am currently in year 12 and would like some advice on applying to oxford for an economics and management degree. What would you say is the best college in oxford and could you please recommend any alternative universities for my 5 choices. At the moment, I am considering oxford, king's college and LSE. Thank you and any advice will be greatly appreciated!
(edited 2 years ago)

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Reply 1
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Reply 2
Original post by Nithu05
Hi guys, I am currently in year 12 and would like some advice on applying to oxford for an economics and management degree. What would you say is the best college in oxford and could you please recommend any alternative universities for my 5 choices. At the moment, I am considering oxford, king's college and LSE. Thank you and any advice will be greatly appreciated!


This will seriously depend on what career you’re interested in. I’m guessing it’s finance? Which sector of finance?
Best college is different for everyone - you need to pick for yourself and overall, it's not as of the college will be where you will be taught, that's handled by the faculty of XXX department
Reply 4
Original post by j25_8
This will seriously depend on what career you’re interested in. I’m guessing it’s finance? Which sector of finance?

I’m hoping to get into investment banking
Reply 5
Original post by AmIReallyHere
Best college is different for everyone - you need to pick for yourself and overall, it's not as of the college will be where you will be taught, that's handled by the faculty of XXX department

Ok thank you so much :smile: I never knew this beforehand
Reply 6
Original post by Nithu05
I’m hoping to get into investment banking


I thought you would say that. I’d recommend accounting & finance bsc at LSE. They will have programs specifically for IB and to land a job there you will need to get into one of those programs. Investment banks literally go to schools like LSE to recruit their analysts but in this case going there will do you more good than going to Oxford frankly. They just don’t have the same extracurricular programs available for finance. You’ll also learn more transferable skills there if you do accounting and finance. You won’t use a solid 95% of what you learn in economics if you do pure economics at university especially if it’s a BA (Oxford say on their site that their econ & management degrees are BA only, not bsc). You can still go of course but for IB your journey will only be smoother if you go for LSE as your target. Other universities I’d suggest are Warwick (accounting/finance), Kings (accounting/finance), Oxbridge (Economics) and UCL (Economics) in that order
Reply 7
Original post by j25_8
I thought you would say that. I’d recommend accounting & finance bsc at LSE. They will have programs specifically for IB and to land a job there you will need to get into one of those programs. Investment banks literally go to schools like LSE to recruit their analysts but in this case going there will do you more good than going to Oxford frankly. They just don’t have the same extracurricular programs available for finance. You’ll also learn more transferable skills there if you do accounting and finance. You won’t use a solid 95% of what you learn in economics if you do pure economics at university especially if it’s a BA (Oxford say on their site that their econ & management degrees are BA only, not bsc). You can still go of course but for IB your journey will only be smoother if you go for LSE as your target. Other universities I’d suggest are Warwick (accounting/finance), Kings (accounting/finance), Oxbridge (Economics) and UCL (Economics) in that order

Oh wow. You’ve provided me with a completely new perspective on this matter. However, my dream uni has always been Oxford and I feel that I would enjoy an economics degree much more compared to an accounting/finance degree. Thanks for your suggestion. I’ll definitely look into the specific modules that an accounting/finance degree offers :smile:
Original post by j25_8
You won’t use a solid 95% of what you learn in economics if you do pure economics at university especially if it’s a BA (Oxford say on their site that their econ & management degrees are BA only, not bsc).

That's maybe an issue at universities where it is a marker of how scientific/mathematical a degree is, but it's really not relevant for Oxford, where all the undergraduate degrees are BA (including physics, chemistry, maths...)
Original post by j25_8
Oxford say on their site that their econ & management degrees are BA only, not bsc


All undergraduate degrees offered by Oxford (and Cambridge) are BAs (or BA + MPhys etc for subjects with an integrated masters). The BA designation does not suggest anything about the course content. The famously rigorous maths course at Cambridge is a BA, as is natural sciences at Cambridge, biochemistry at Oxford, etc.

This is due to convention where historically the BSc was a higher degree (like a masters or doctorate) and to be admitted to that you first had to have a BA (or rather, MA, but I won't explain the Oxbridge MA convention here as it's besides the point). The BPhil and BCL at Oxford, both masters degrees, are part of the same convention of high B... degrees. I think the BMus and BTh also used to be awarded but I don't know if that is still the case.

Original post by skylark2
That's maybe an issue at universities where it is a marker of how scientific/mathematical a degree is, but it's really not relevant for Oxford, where all the undergraduate degrees are BA (including physics, chemistry, maths...)


PRSOM :smile:

Original post by Nithu05
Oh wow. You’ve provided me with a completely new perspective on this matter. However, my dream uni has always been Oxford and I feel that I would enjoy an economics degree much more compared to an accounting/finance degree. Thanks for your suggestion. I’ll definitely look into the specific modules that an accounting/finance degree offers :smile:


You won't use much of any degree in investment banking, and they don't require any particular academic background. You could do Egyptology and go into the field if you so wished, provided you got relevant work experience during the degree and can demonstrate the relevant professional skills needed. So just study what you actually find interesting and enjoyable, as long as you do so at a target uni, and you're fine for IBanking. Advanced excel skills (actually advanced though) and GCSE Maths are really all you need for investment banking (as well as lacking a spine and being willing to give up your 20s working 100 hour weeks with no overtime pay to earn effectively the hourly wage of a McDonalds worker while being **** on by everyone else you work with continually, in the hopes you might scrape through to some cushy hedge fund position).
(edited 2 years ago)
Warwick and UCL are great too, both for courses and work ties.

My friend applied this year for Eco + Management, but got rejected sadly. Offer rate according to admissions report is 1/15, very tough to get into, but highly rewarding. You got this 😎
(edited 2 years ago)
Original post by crashcody
Warwick and UCL are great too, both for courses and work ties.

My friend applied this year for Eco + Management, but got rejected sadly. Offer rate according to admissions report is 1/15, very tough to get into, but highly rewarding. You got this 😎


The figures for UK domiciled students are much more favourable (albeit still very competitive, not the most competitive course there). The low success rate of E&M at Oxford is largely driven by huge numbers of international students applying to the fairly small course while, presumably, not meeting all the requirements and thus automatically being rejected (probably because they're just applying to every big name international university they know of and Oxford is pretty low on their list compared to Ivies and grande ecoles etc, so they don't really read the fine print).
(edited 2 years ago)
Reply 12
Original post by artful_lounger
All undergraduate degrees offered by Oxford (and Cambridge) are BAs (or BA + MPhys etc for subjects with an integrated masters). The BA designation does not suggest anything about the course content. The famously rigorous maths course at Cambridge is a BA, as is natural sciences at Cambridge, biochemistry at Oxford, etc.

This is due to convention where historically the BSc was a higher degree (like a masters or doctorate) and to be admitted to that you first had to have a BA (or rather, MA, but I won't explain the Oxbridge MA convention here as it's besides the point). The BPhil and BCL at Oxford, both masters degrees, are part of the same convention of high B... degrees. I think the BMus and BTh also used to be awarded but I don't know if that is still the case.



PRSOM :smile:



You won't use much of any degree in investment banking, and they don't require any particular academic background. You could do Egyptology and go into the field if you so wished, provided you got relevant work experience during the degree and can demonstrate the relevant professional skills needed. So just study what you actually find interesting and enjoyable, as long as you do so at a target uni, and you're fine for IBanking. Advanced excel skills (actually advanced though) and GCSE Maths are really all you need for investment banking (as well as lacking a spine and being willing to give up your 20s working 100 hour weeks with no overtime pay to earn effectively the hourly wage of a McDonalds worker while being **** on by everyone else you work with continually, in the hopes you might scrape through to some cushy hedge fund position).


Thank you so much for your advice :smile: didn’t expect to see such a horrific description of IB 😂
Reply 13
Original post by crashcody
Warwick and UCL are great too, both for courses and work ties.

My friend applied this year for Eco + Management, but got rejected sadly. Offer rate according to admissions report is 1/15, very tough to get into, but highly rewarding. You got this 😎

Thanks a lot :smile:
Reply 14
Original post by artful_lounger
The figures for UK domiciled students are much more favourable (albeit still very competitive, not the most competitive course there). The low success rate of E&M at Oxford is largely driven by huge numbers of international students applying to the fairly small course while, presumably, not meeting all the requirements and thus automatically being rejected (probably because they're just applying to every big name international university they know of and Oxford is pretty low on their list compared to Ivies and grande ecoles etc, so they don't really read the fine print).

What 😱 I never knew about this. damn
Original post by Nithu05
Thank you so much for your advice :smile: didn’t expect to see such a horrific description of IB 😂


You should maybe read some blogs of IB analysts, they all paint pretty much that picture (get to work at 0630, work until 7pm, order dinner into the office, stick around for face time until ~11pm, repeat, etc. Also the work does not seem particularly stimulating since it's not much analysis so much as scanning spreadsheets and arguing with the other analysts about what font to use for the slide deck you're putting together so your boss can put their name on it...
Original post by aaq1
For UK domiciled the average offer rate was 9% for 2018-20 which is the lowest for course offering >20 places per annum. Overall, offer rate is 5.5% - so better for UK domiciled students but still extremely competitive. So think about that.

Oxford Undergraduate Admission Stats


Still behind CS and maths and stats, and commonly it's near 10% with PhysPhil and other maths/CS courses being more competitive. Also UK domiciled students are still twice as likely to be successful in applying to that course which is notable.
Reply 17
Original post by skylark2
That's maybe an issue at universities where it is a marker of how scientific/mathematical a degree is, but it's really not relevant for Oxford, where all the undergraduate degrees are BA (including physics, chemistry, maths...)


True but going that route for this course in particular will hurt him a bit because it’ll be best for his course to be as little theoretical as possible and focus on applied skills & knowledge. You won’t get those applicable skills from an economics degree and in terms of which universities investment banks target, they certainly don’t target Oxford more heavily than LSE. At best they’re targeted the same. Even then, a target school that specialises in economics will probably be a better pick than one that doesn’t for ib. If it’s not for the skills you learn, it’ll be from the opportunities they offer you in networking and internships
Reply 18
Original post by artful_lounger
You won't use much of any degree in investment banking, and they don't require any particular academic background. You could do Egyptology and go into the field if you so wished, provided you got relevant work experience during the degree and can demonstrate the relevant professional skills needed. So just study what you actually find interesting and enjoyable, as long as you do so at a target uni, and you're fine for IBanking. Advanced excel skills (actually advanced though) and GCSE Maths are really all you need for investment banking (as well as lacking a spine and being willing to give up your 20s working 100 hour weeks with no overtime pay to earn effectively the hourly wage of a McDonalds worker while being **** on by everyone else you work with continually, in the hopes you might scrape through to some cushy hedge fund position).


You need accounting knowledge and statistical knowledge to do well in ib im afraid. Interviewers will want to ask you questions related to both of those fields to see if you’re a good fit and to make yourself stand out, you’re gonna wanna confidently answer them for your own sake. Op has the chance to get arguably the most applicable degree to his future career. Not sure why you think it’s a good idea to dissuade him from doing so tbh. And yeah doing a degree like that will make it insanely and unnecessarily difficult for you to even land an internship, let alone a full time offer. It’s true that ib very often hire people from non finance backgrounds but their degree will still typically have to be quantitative & defo from a target or semi target. Even that comes with lots and lots of networking and without a relevant degree i wouldn’t wanna think about how difficult it would be to land an offer when you’re competing against 30 other people that do

I agree with you on the hours though. They’re defo not always that bad and the work is oftentimes interesting but if you don’t see yourself doing 70 hour weeks on avg then you might wanna reconsider? Again an internship will help you a lot with assessing whether or not you like the work and have the grit to do it, so doing a degree that is better tailored to ib will go further than doing a degree that will get you into the job but not prepare you for it at all by comparison. Pay is very high though for those who do have that grit
Reply 19
Original post by aaq1
Oxford E&M course not a pure Econ course - it is joint honours. For the final 2 years you can customise to focus on the areas you need to. You can select the 8 papers you wish to study with minimum 2 from Econ and minimum 2 from Management. One can easily select accounting, finance and quantitative methods among other things. See the broad range of choice avaialble here - https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/request/822878/response/1966348/attach/3/2201%2076%20ltr.pdf?cookie_passthrough=1


Oxford E&M is perfectly fine for a career in IB. Anyway OP has 5 choices on UCAS and usually Econ applicants put Oxbridge, LSE, UCL, Warwick etc on their application. All of these are competitive to get in. If I were OP, I would focus more on my chances of getting in - excellent GCSEs, A-levels, supra-curriculars, admission tests etc than which of these are better. For a career in IB, a degree in any discipline from a top Uni is good. Also, OP should consider which subjects they really like to study than focussing too much on the end career. Their view may change in 3 years so better to go for a degree that provides excellent foundation. Cannot go wrong with a degree in economics or finance from any of the top unis - Oxford E&M is as good as it gets in that respect.

Thank you so much. The advice you guys have given is invaluable to me :smile: In term of my GCSE grades, I have a strong foundation of 8 9s and 2 8s. Additionally, I’m predicted all a*s in my a levels. I’m also in a Sutton trust pathways to banking and finance programme and applied to HSBC, UNIQ and a young investment banker programme run by INVESTIN. Are there any other supra-cirriculars that you’ve heard of which you would recommend? Furthermore, I heard that it is pretty difficult to get into LSE without further maths. What’s your thoughts on this guys?
(edited 2 years ago)

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