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    Will Tuition fees be a success for the nation on a whole or not? in your response just consider the numbers appplying to uni's these days!
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    i think the fees currently are at a level that makes it just about feasible for most to afford it.

    when they get hiked in the next few years i think a lot less people will end up going to university.
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    Why are your fees being raised? Are all uk institutions owned by the government?
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    (Original post by Moncal)
    Why are your fees being raised? Are all uk institutions owned by the government?
    they receive government funding and the government wants to recoup some of the costs from what ive seen.

    seems fair enough to me
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    (Original post by technik)
    they receive government funding and the government wants to recoup some of the costs from what ive seen.

    seems fair enough to me
    How much are current fees?
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    (Original post by Moncal)
    How much are current fees?
    Peanuts compared to what most US colleges charge.
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    (Original post by Moncal)
    How much are current fees?
    Maximum of £1,125 a year (or there abouts, it may be £1,150 this year) for a home student. It costs between £10,000 and £18,000 per year to educate someone and the government makes that up. If you're not a home student you have to pay full fees.

    You also get a loan of up to £4,000 a year (means tested) but everyone is allowed to take £3,000 of that.

    (p.s. some of these figures might be £100 or so out, but I'm going by what I remember from last year)
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    I support top-up fees. You can pay them back via the tax system over a very long period and it seems fair that considering graduates generally earn more money than non-graduates that they pay for their education.
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    (Original post by Howard)
    Peanuts compared to what most US colleges charge.
    But they don't have the generous scholarships that US colleges have. For example, at Harvard the fees/accommodation costs at Harvard are something like $40,000 a year. If your parents income is less than £50,000 you get a substanial amount of help - less than £20,000 then they cover to lot!

    I know this because I was very interested in applying to Harvard myself at one time. And I have quoted the up-to-date figures
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    The government in this country have managed to convince the students who will be paying top-up fees bringing the total to £3,000 per year (for the time being!) that it is good to pay more.
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    (Original post by Lord Huntroyde)
    I support top-up fees. You can pay them back via the tax system over a very long period and it seems fair that considering graduates generally earn more money than non-graduates that they pay for their education.
    I do think it's daft that you'd be expected to pay it back at around £15,000 income - hardly a wage that is more likely to be attained by graduates!
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    (Original post by blissy)
    I do think it's daft that you'd be expected to pay it back at around £15,000 income - hardly a wage that is more likely to be attained by graduates!
    Average graduate salary is currently £21,000 pa.
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    (Original post by yawn)
    The government in this country have managed to convince the students who will be paying top-up fees bringing the total to £3,000 per year (for the time being!) that it is good to pay more.
    i dont think they've managed to convince the muppets in the NUS...

    and it is better to pay more. the money has to come from somewhere. the current £1125 covers bugger all. in my course, it probably covers one of the PCs i use...
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    (Original post by yawn)
    Average graduate salary is currently £21,000 pa.
    Well then I personally think repayments should start at £21,000
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    (Original post by technik)
    i dont think they've managed to convince the muppets in the NUS...

    and it is better to pay more. the money has to come from somewhere. the current £1125 covers bugger all. in my course, it probably covers one of the PCs i use...
    I think there is the understanding that the contribution made by students to their degree costs is minimal by all sections of British society, including the NUS.

    Where the disagreement is, is where the shortfall should come from. Some say that those who parents are receiving more than say, £60,000 per year should contribute much more to their offsprings course costs. Others maintain that tax payers should fund it as it is the economical infrastructure of the country that gains from a well educated populace. And then there is the argument that those who enjoyed a free university education should be made to contribute retrospectively.

    What is wrong with the youth of today - they are so compliant!
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    (Original post by blissy)
    Well then I personally think repayments should start at £21,000
    If students are to be saddled with enormous debts before they even think of getting married, buying a house, having a family and providing for a pension then yes - the higher the salary as which they start repaying, the better.
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    (Original post by yawn)
    If students are to be saddled with enormous debts before they even think of getting married, buying a house, having a family and providing for a pension then yes - the higher the salary as which they start repaying, the better.
    Factor into that that the person they marry may indeed have similar levels of debt to them and it become preposterous!
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    (Original post by blissy)
    Factor into that that the person they marry may indeed have similar levels of debt to them and it become preposterous!
    The trouble is, when one is young (say 18) the last thing they are thinking about is their future finances when they are in their late 20's, early 30's - especially as they invariably haven't met the person they want to settle down with - at the start of uni education.

    I'm pleased Blissy that you are considering the potentai ramifications of this iniquitous top-up charge.
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    (Original post by yawn)
    The trouble is, when one is young (say 18) the last thing they are thinking about is their future finances when they are in their late 20's, early 30's - especially as they invariably haven't met the person they want to settle down with - at the start of uni education.

    I'm pleased Blissy that you are considering the potentai ramifications of this iniquitous top-up charge.
    Well as it stands my bf and I will owe £24,000 (because we are both doing three year courses and are entitle to 100% of the loan and have no choice but to take 100% of the loan). With top up charges it would be £24,000 in loans and then £18,000 in fees I can't help but think about it! (blimey that's a heck of a lot of money)

    It still makes me angry to think that the poorest people (who must take the full loan) will end up with more debt, whereas the people who can afford to be funded by their parents will have less/no debt at the other end. And so the cycle continues...
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    (Original post by yawn)
    The trouble is, when one is young (say 18) the last thing they are thinking about is their future finances when they are in their late 20's, early 30's - especially as they invariably haven't met the person they want to settle down with - at the start of uni education.

    I'm pleased Blissy that you are considering the potentai ramifications of this iniquitous top-up charge.
    im not sure where you stand.

    care to clarify?
 
 
 
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