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BTEC general question

so in the past i have been struggling to meet my merit and distinction in my assignments i have asked my teacher and didn't really get any response does anybody have tips that they could share on me in general on how to do a merit and distinction criteria
(edited 1 year ago)
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Original post by ////////////
so in the past i have been struggling to meet my merit and distinction in my assignments i have asked my teacher and didn't really get any response does anybody have tips that they could share on me in general on how to do a merit and distinction criteria

Hi, I did a BTEC in Applied Science last year and finished with a D*DD. sorry to hear you've been struggling with the criteria, they can be quite a challenge at times. Can I ask what your doing your BTEC in? I feel like my advice will be tailored to Applied Science but it still could be useful. Also, are you in your first or second year?

A lot of the time the criteria wants you to show evidence that you understand the assignment, for example they want case studies and information from published literature (remember to cite your sources to keep your plagarism score low) in order to show a broad understanding of the assignment. you need to link what you understand from the literature back to the assignment and what the criteria is asking you.

Comparisons are also regularly asked in assignments, depending on the nature of the assignment, they may ask you to compare one thing to another and to weigh up the benefits and disadvantages of both. One of my assignments asked the risks and benefits of using CAT scans versus MRI scans in non-ionising and ionising radiation procedures. both of these equipments have their benefits and disadvantages but the key is explaining and weighing up each one against each other to show you understand how each one works and the different effects each would have on the human body.

an example from one of my previous assignments (Distinction Criteria):

Discuss why prevention and safety measures are put into place to protect patients and health care workers. Discuss the potential consequences of failing to follow and comply with Health and Safety guidance and regulations. Include specific, scientific reasons why the precautions and measures taken in clinical radiology to protect patients and operators.

My Assignment response:

The Consequences of Poor Health and Safety

Whilst health and safety measures are adhered to the vast majority of the time, in some instances, accidents have occurred due to incorrectly following safety procedures. This would imply that the Control of Electromagnetic Fields at Work Regulations Act 2016 was possibly not upheld.
The consequences of not upholding the Control of Electromagnetic Fields at Work Regulations Act 2016 vary depending on whether ionising or non-ionising radiation was involved. In regard to the patient and X-Rays and CAT scans, the chance of developing cancer and other diseases related to cellular DNA damage increase drastically with the more X-Rays and/or CAT scans undergone. For the radiographer, they too would be at an even higher chance due to the fact that they work in and around these machines for much longer periods of time. It is the company’s job to ensure both patients and employees have the correct, fully functioning PPE and that they stay within the recommended guidelines of radiation exposure. As stated by https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ the maximum exposure an employee over 18 years is 20mSv (millisieverts) per year. The consequences of not abiding by this health and safety legislation may vary for each individual but documented cases include a reduced quality of life from various cancers that could develop and the severity of it. As well as a reduced quality of life from procedures they may have to undergo to slow or halt the growth of cancer cells. Depending on whether the treatment is successful, a reduced lifespan is also a possibility. It should be noted that the negative health effects are normally seen years, if not decades after initial dosage.
In regard to MRI, the ill-effects are normally seen immediately if not very shortly after the scan. If a previous surgery involving a metal implantation is missed and the patient goes ahead with the scan, potentially catastrophic injuries could occur. An example of this would be the dislodge of a metal hip replacement or pacemaker. The incredibly strong pull of the magnets within the MRI could cause major internal bleeding or heart failure, both of these being extremely life-threatening. These effects are immediate but for patients who are given contrast dyes to help with imaging, kidney damage could occur as well as digestive issues and nausea if adverse side effects do happen. To avoid this, patient records should be checked for any previous kidney and/or digestive issues to avoid this from occurring.

Sorry that I typed a lot, I really hope this helps and sorry if I've overwhelmed you at all with the volume. Best of luck with your BTEC. I'm sure you're gonna do great!
Original post by Lonnica
Hi, I did a BTEC in Applied Science last year and finished with a D*DD. sorry to hear you've been struggling with the criteria, they can be quite a challenge at times. Can I ask what your doing your BTEC in? I feel like my advice will be tailored to Applied Science but it still could be useful. Also, are you in your first or second year?

A lot of the time the criteria wants you to show evidence that you understand the assignment, for example they want case studies and information from published literature (remember to cite your sources to keep your plagarism score low) in order to show a broad understanding of the assignment. you need to link what you understand from the literature back to the assignment and what the criteria is asking you.

Comparisons are also regularly asked in assignments, depending on the nature of the assignment, they may ask you to compare one thing to another and to weigh up the benefits and disadvantages of both. One of my assignments asked the risks and benefits of using CAT scans versus MRI scans in non-ionising and ionising radiation procedures. both of these equipments have their benefits and disadvantages but the key is explaining and weighing up each one against each other to show you understand how each one works and the different effects each would have on the human body.

an example from one of my previous assignments (Distinction Criteria):

Discuss why prevention and safety measures are put into place to protect patients and health care workers. Discuss the potential consequences of failing to follow and comply with Health and Safety guidance and regulations. Include specific, scientific reasons why the precautions and measures taken in clinical radiology to protect patients and operators.

My Assignment response:

The Consequences of Poor Health and Safety

Whilst health and safety measures are adhered to the vast majority of the time, in some instances, accidents have occurred due to incorrectly following safety procedures. This would imply that the Control of Electromagnetic Fields at Work Regulations Act 2016 was possibly not upheld.
The consequences of not upholding the Control of Electromagnetic Fields at Work Regulations Act 2016 vary depending on whether ionising or non-ionising radiation was involved. In regard to the patient and X-Rays and CAT scans, the chance of developing cancer and other diseases related to cellular DNA damage increase drastically with the more X-Rays and/or CAT scans undergone. For the radiographer, they too would be at an even higher chance due to the fact that they work in and around these machines for much longer periods of time. It is the company’s job to ensure both patients and employees have the correct, fully functioning PPE and that they stay within the recommended guidelines of radiation exposure. As stated by https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ the maximum exposure an employee over 18 years is 20mSv (millisieverts) per year. The consequences of not abiding by this health and safety legislation may vary for each individual but documented cases include a reduced quality of life from various cancers that could develop and the severity of it. As well as a reduced quality of life from procedures they may have to undergo to slow or halt the growth of cancer cells. Depending on whether the treatment is successful, a reduced lifespan is also a possibility. It should be noted that the negative health effects are normally seen years, if not decades after initial dosage.
In regard to MRI, the ill-effects are normally seen immediately if not very shortly after the scan. If a previous surgery involving a metal implantation is missed and the patient goes ahead with the scan, potentially catastrophic injuries could occur. An example of this would be the dislodge of a metal hip replacement or pacemaker. The incredibly strong pull of the magnets within the MRI could cause major internal bleeding or heart failure, both of these being extremely life-threatening. These effects are immediate but for patients who are given contrast dyes to help with imaging, kidney damage could occur as well as digestive issues and nausea if adverse side effects do happen. To avoid this, patient records should be checked for any previous kidney and/or digestive issues to avoid this from occurring.

Sorry that I typed a lot, I really hope this helps and sorry if I've overwhelmed you at all with the volume. Best of luck with your BTEC. I'm sure you're gonna do great!

Thanks for the response i am doing BTEC Business level 3 extended diploma and i am in my second year although our courses are different there is still a lot i can take away from this
(edited 1 year ago)

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