The Student Room Group

Health care degrees/careers

Hi, I wanted some healthcare degree recommendations as I’m so stuck at deciding atm. I currently study biology, psychology and sociology and I was wondering what career I would be able to do with those A levels. I have always wanted to work within the healthcare sector and want to help make a difference to peoples lives, thanks.
Hey I’m doing the same subjects as u! Personally I’m planning on doing midwifery because I want to support women through pregnancy and labour but there are so many others u can apply to such as nursing or occupational therapy u could also go into social work which are all equally rewarding careers here is a list of all the jobs in the nhs that can help u choose xhttps://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/explore-roles here is a list of all the jobs in the nhs
Reply 2
Hello, you should explore the many different health care courses that there are, this website is very good

https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/explore-roles
Original post by Random18374748
Hi, I wanted some healthcare degree recommendations as I’m so stuck at deciding atm. I currently study biology, psychology and sociology and I was wondering what career I would be able to do with those A levels. I have always wanted to work within the healthcare sector and want to help make a difference to peoples lives, thanks.

To get onto a nursing degree or any other nursing courses , you generally need an A level, Advanced Higher or equivalent qualification in at least one science from biology, chemistry, physics, applied science, health and social care, psychology, sociology or physical education, plus two other subjects.

Check with your chosen universities what there entry requirements are for each course and you'll know exactly what you will need then.

Current NHS nurse student....
Original post by Random18374748
Hi, I wanted some healthcare degree recommendations as I’m so stuck at deciding atm. I currently study biology, psychology and sociology and I was wondering what career I would be able to do with those A levels. I have always wanted to work within the healthcare sector and want to help make a difference to peoples lives, thanks.


Original post by Chantal_
Hey I’m doing the same subjects as u! Personally I’m planning on doing midwifery because I want to support women through pregnancy and labour but there are so many others u can apply to such as nursing or occupational therapy u could also go into social work which are all equally rewarding careers here is a list of all the jobs in the nhs that can help u choose xhttps://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/explore-roles here is a list of all the jobs in the nhs


What Chantal said is absolutely right about you can apply for so many different types of jobs within nursing - the healthcare industry. Check out the university entry requirements first of all and see what they are asking for or contact them and ask questions about it ok.

I did psychology prior to doing midwifing as I used the course for my education side as I was out of date with my education requirements the time I got into midwifery degree course.

I'm now a NHS registered midwife and it's a worth while job to.
Original post by Tracey_W
What Chantal said is absolutely right about you can apply for so many different types of jobs within nursing - the healthcare industry. Check out the university entry requirements first of all and see what they are asking for or contact them and ask questions about it ok.

I did psychology prior to doing midwifing as I used the course for my education side as I was out of date with my education requirements the time I got into midwifery degree course.

I'm now a NHS registered midwife and it's a worth while job to.


Hiya! I just wanted to ask what it's like working as a midwife, it is definitely something I want to do and have a passion for but I read a lot that it's severely understaffed and leads to a lot of midwives quitting, is it always like this?
Original post by Chantal_
Hiya! I just wanted to ask what it's like working as a midwife, it is definitely something I want to do and have a passion for but I read a lot that it's severely understaffed and leads to a lot of midwives quitting, is it always like this?

Hi

It's great working as a midwife as probably one of the best Jobs you could have in nursing. It's worthwhile at the end of the day, seeing the happiness you bring to people.

Majority of maternity unit's is probably understaffed as you said, depending on how big each maternity unit's is then yes they understaffed..... For example I'm on a 30 bed unit but only have 12 qualified staff, 6 MCA staff, 6 HCA staff and 4 auxiliary nurses plus how many students we are allocated in each year of there studying. We meant to have at least 18 minimum qualified staff. Nothing to do with quitting as few retired as well and the whole UK devolve governments never thought about upping the number's again similar to situation with adult nursing right now with them bragging about how many new nurses they got this last year - they are also counting the students into this number not all qualified.
Original post by Chantal_
Hiya! I just wanted to ask what it's like working as a midwife, it is definitely something I want to do and have a passion for but I read a lot that it's severely understaffed and leads to a lot of midwives quitting, is it always like this?

Just to add, they not taking on enough potential students each year for it is another major issue.
Each university only take in a limited number of potential students each year as hospitals base those numbers on availability of Jobs positions that they will need at the end of each 3 year course done.

They take on far more adult nursing students than any other nursing field due to the facts it's the biggest area required staffing.
Original post by Tracey_W
Just to add, they not taking on enough potential students each year for it is another major issue.
Each university only take in a limited number of potential students each year as hospitals base those numbers on availability of Jobs positions that they will need at the end of each 3 year course done.

They take on far more adult nursing students than any other nursing field due to the facts it's the biggest area required staffing.

Thank you this makes a lot more sense
Original post by Chantal_
Thank you this makes a lot more sense

It's not just a recent problem with taking on enough potential students as been happening for year's as university I went to only took in 94 students and they still taking that approx numbers now.

They need to take on more as the staff are getting older not younger and if they don't reolve it they're going to be in big trouble.
Original post by Tracey_W
It's not just a recent problem with taking on enough potential students as been happening for year's as university I went to only took in 94 students and they still taking that approx numbers now.

They need to take on more as the staff are getting older not younger and if they don't reolve it they're going to be in big trouble.

Yes I've been researching a lot on this issue and it isn't great, the government really are not that helpful at all hopefully it changes though
Original post by Chantal_
Yes I've been researching a lot on this issue and it isn't great, the government really are not that helpful at all hopefully it changes though

I don't trust the Westminster government on things as I think we all know what they are like.
They aren't helpful especially Westminster with grudgingly meaningful £5 k leaning grant or whatever they call it, whereas ours get £10 k bursary each year without issues usually.

Thankfully for me I don't come under Westminster government as have my own who deals with our NHS etc.
Hi, I was just wondering what uni or area you are, getting 10k bursary? That seems a little strange doesn't it, one area getting double the amount to some where else? Hope you don't mind me asking.
Original post by hope2bnurse
Hi, I was just wondering what uni or area you are, getting 10k bursary? That seems a little strange doesn't it, one area getting double the amount to some where else? Hope you don't mind me asking.

Because our Scottish government looks after there students better than Westminster government do.... Reason why a higher bursary.....
Original post by Tracey_W
Because our Scottish government looks after there students better than Westminster government do.... Reason why a higher bursary.....

This is true. I'd be seriously looking at relocating to Scotland if I was able to, but we're happy settled here and I think another big move would kill me with stress.

We still have a bursary in Wales as well, it's not as generous as the one offered North of the wall, also in Wales you have to work in the NHS for two years post registration as a condition of receiving the bursary, which I think is fair.
Original post by moonkatt
This is true. I'd be seriously looking at relocating to Scotland if I was able to, but we're happy settled here and I think another big move would kill me with stress.

We still have a bursary in Wales as well, it's not as generous as the one offered North of the wall, also in Wales you have to work in the NHS for two years post registration as a condition of receiving the bursary, which I think is fair.

Yeah I do find its unfair to potential students throughout the UK having to put up with poor bursary help when us Scots get the best deal in the country. We use to not be able to apply for students loans etc due to having the full bursary except for likes of accomodation help, don't know if this still applies like but I never ever bothered about the loans side as bursary was fine for me...

Plus we are slightly better paid as well as our newly qualified band 5 earns from about £26,200 at bottom before any shift allowance etc.

I think English newly qualified band 5 earns £25,600 after two years which is ridiculous like as we all should be equally paid throughout the UK but it's obviously upto the devolved government's to decide what the staff are worth.

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