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Doing a non-law degree, will it effect my chances of a tc?

Hi Guys,

Will be starting at Leeds in September, doing a foundation year to progress onto either politics/IR or law. I am hoping to secure a TC at a decent firm but was wondering whether not doing a law degree would affect my chances of securing a training contract (as I would have to do the PGDL - as apparently firms want this before the SQE, although not mandated by the SRA). Would it be safer doing a Law degree, or equal chances if I did a non-law degree?

Thanks!!
Original post by symptom
Hi Guys,

Will be starting at Leeds in September, doing a foundation year to progress onto either politics/IR or law. I am hoping to secure a TC at a decent firm but was wondering whether not doing a law degree would affect my chances of securing a training contract (as I would have to do the PGDL - as apparently firms want this before the SQE, although not mandated by the SRA). Would it be safer doing a Law degree, or equal chances if I did a non-law degree?

Thanks!!

You'd likely have to do a pgdl but having a non law degree won't work against you when applying for TCS.
short answer: equal chances. City law firms recruit roughly 50/50 law and non-law
I'm a non-law and have done 4 ACs, secured 3 Vacation Schemes (1MC, 1SC, 1US).
(edited 2 years ago)
Original post by symptom
Hi Guys,

Will be starting at Leeds in September, doing a foundation year to progress onto either politics/IR or law. I am hoping to secure a TC at a decent firm but was wondering whether not doing a law degree would affect my chances of securing a training contract (as I would have to do the PGDL - as apparently firms want this before the SQE, although not mandated by the SRA). Would it be safer doing a Law degree, or equal chances if I did a non-law degree?

Thanks!!

Hi Symptom

If you intend to go straight into law from university, you need to make sure your degree is a qualifying law degree (not all are- a good list can be found here: https://www.sra.org.uk/become-solicitor/legal-practice-course-route/qualifying-law-degree-common-professional-examination/qualifying-law-degree-providers/) .

If you chose to study politics or a law degree that isn't a qualifying one then you will need to complete additional studies afterwards (so makes the route slightly longer and more expensive). This can vary depending on whether you want to be a solicitor or a barrister. There are several routes into these professions and you can find a great career map here: https://www.lawcareers.net/Starting-Out/Beginners-Guide-Career-Law/Legal-Career-Paths

One thing I do want to stress you is that starting with a non-law degree will definitely not disadvantage you!

Hope those resources help.

Nic
Student Ambassador at the University of Law
Hello,

I’m Teresa, a third year law student at the University of Southampton. Assuming you do all relevant qualifications, a non law degree would not necessarily affect your chances of securing a training contract. Some law firms are about a 50-50 split in terms of non law degree and law degree.

However, as mentioned above, if you choose to do law and or a joint honours with law and it’s not a qualifying law degree you will have to undertake further legal studies.

Any questions about law or law at Southampton let me know!

All the best,

Teresa (University of Southampton Ambassador)
Your spelling will. Your non-law degree won't, provided that you prepare well for the interviews and can answer some simple questions on why you chose to study it, what other careers you are considering, and others in that vein.
Original post by yuki1201
City law firms recruit roughly 50/50 law and non-law

This in itself doesn't tell us much as - as far as I know - we don't know what proportion law and non-law graduates apply in. If the applicants are 80% non-law, the figure becomes less impressive (though still understandable). If the applicants are 50% non-law, then the figure becomes more meaningful.
Reply 7
Original post by Augustino D
Your spelling will. Your non-law degree won't, provided that you prepare well for the interviews and can answer some simple questions on why you chose to study it, what other careers you are considering, and others in that vein.


Haha what is up with my spelling?
Original post by symptom
Haha what is up with my spelling?

effect/affect

'Twas a joke.
Original post by symptom
Hi Guys,

Will be starting at Leeds in September, doing a foundation year to progress onto either politics/IR or law. I am hoping to secure a TC at a decent firm but was wondering whether not doing a law degree would affect my chances of securing a training contract (as I would have to do the PGDL - as apparently firms want this before the SQE, although not mandated by the SRA). Would it be safer doing a Law degree, or equal chances if I did a non-law degree?

Thanks!!


Hiya,

It is possible to qualify through both routes (although longer if you do not do a law degree). Law firms do employ from both law degree and non law degree backgrounds. I really think it comes down to where your interests lie. A law degree will allow you to study law in much more depth and can be a good idea to get a feel for what a law career could be like. But if you have interests outside of law, such as in politics and international relations, you have the chance to study them and still pursue law.

Any questions let me know.

Kind regards,

Teresa (University of Southampton Ambassador)
Reply 10
Original post by symptom
Hi Guys,

Will be starting at Leeds in September, doing a foundation year to progress onto either politics/IR or law. I am hoping to secure a TC at a decent firm but was wondering whether not doing a law degree would affect my chances of securing a training contract (as I would have to do the PGDL - as apparently firms want this before the SQE, although not mandated by the SRA). Would it be safer doing a Law degree, or equal chances if I did a non-law degree?

Thanks!!


How was the entry requirements for the foundation course ? And where they lenient with entry requirements for you?
Reply 11
Your question is around obtaining a TC, from what you said you will be undertaking a foundation year plus 3 years for a degree. Already that is 4 years away. Assuming you obtain a TC straight away if not it may take you another year or 2. Would TC's not have been phased out by firms by then?
Therefore it will make no difference, TC's will have been phased out and you would be looking at undertaking the SQE exams with work experience. Alternatively, you could obtain a law degree, go down the CILEX route then qualify over to a solicitor.

Just adding some further thoughts as you may have more options than you think
Original post by v24m
Your question is around obtaining a TC, from what you said you will be undertaking a foundation year plus 3 years for a degree. Already that is 4 years away. Assuming you obtain a TC straight away if not it may take you another year or 2. Would TC's not have been phased out by firms by then?
Therefore it will make no difference, TC's will have been phased out and you would be looking at undertaking the SQE exams with work experience. Alternatively, you could obtain a law degree, go down the CILEX route then qualify over to a solicitor.

Just adding some further thoughts as you may have more options than you think


Most firms of note will still be maintaining a two year TC even after the sqe is the only option for qualifying.

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