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    (Original post by ilovemonkeys)
    Yep I was really impressed with Sussex when I visited on the SciTech admissions day. I think it's a university that in 5-10 years will make a big impression on the league tables. A lot of students at Sussex studying CS and AI stay on to graduate study so the teaching and resources must be very good; Sussex also attracts a lot of graduates from universities like Manchester, Imperial and Edinburgh for its AI postgrad courses.
    I actually wanted to apply to the Internet Computing course in Sussex, however I don't have the grades to do that. They need at least BBB. It's tempting to go there for postgrad study, lol.

    I'm assuming Sussex is one the leading uni's for AI in England and UK? Do you know which countries attract most students to study at Sussex for undergrad and postgrad study?
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    (Original post by trev)
    I actually wanted to apply to the Internet Computing course in Sussex, however I don't have the grades to do that. They need at least BBB. It's tempting to go there for postgrad study, lol.

    I'm assuming Sussex is one the leading uni's for AI in England and UK? Do you know which countries attract most students to study at Sussex for undergrad and postgrad study?
    I think most of the courses in the Sci Tech department at Sussex require at least BBB - that's what the course entry requirements are for my degree anyway. Yep Sussex is leading in the field. I think Edinburgh is probably the best in the UK for AI and associated subjects like Cognitive Science, followed by a group of universities like Imperial, Manchester, Birmingham and Sussex. It's quite interesting though - each university has its own specialism within the discipine; Birmingham tend to focus on robotics and the engineering side, Edinburgh lean towards very advanced mathematics and neural nets, Sussex are more geared towards bioinformatics/genetics. This is the main reason I chose Sussex - as we discussed in another thread, I'm very interested in bioinformatics and might pursue it at postgrad level in the future. Sussex also offers a very interesting postgrad course called Evolutionary and Adaptive Systems:
    http://www.informatics.susx.ac.uk/easy/index.html

    Sorry, I don't know the answer to your second question regarding the proportion of international/home students.
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    (Original post by ilovemonkeys)
    I think most of the courses in the Sci Tech department at Sussex require at least BBB - that's what the course entry requirements are for my degree anyway. Yep Sussex is leading in the field. I think Edinburgh is probably the best in the UK for AI and associated subjects like Cognitive Science, followed by a group of universities like Imperial, Manchester, Birmingham and Sussex. It's quite interesting though - each university has its own specialism within the discipine; Birmingham tend to focus on robotics and the engineering side, Edinburgh lean towards very advanced mathematics and neural nets, Sussex are more geared towards bioinformatics/genetics. This is the main reason I chose Sussex - as we discussed in another thread, I'm very interested in bioinformatics and might pursue it at postgrad level in the future. Sussex also offers a very interesting postgrad course called Evolutionary and Adaptive Systems:
    http://www.informatics.susx.ac.uk/easy/index.html

    Sorry, I don't know the answer to your second question regarding the proportion of international/home students.
    Are you planning to do postgrad in Sussex after your BSc degree?

    By looking at the specialisms that you mentioned above, I think Sussex will be the best one, as I don't like the math and engineering side of stuff. :p:

    It seems that all computing type courses want BBB or above, except for the foundation year one though. Do you think it's quite competitive to get an offer from that university?

    The course you are doing is BA AI. I thought most uni's will have AI courses as BSc.
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    (Original post by trev)
    Are you planning to do postgrad in Sussex after your BSc degree?

    By looking at the specialisms that you mentioned above, I think Sussex will be the best one, as I don't like the math and engineering side of stuff. :p:

    It seems that all computing type courses want BBB or above, except for the foundation year one though. Do you think it's quite competitive to get an offer from that university?

    The course you are doing is BA AI. I thought most uni's will have AI courses as BSc.
    Yeah I am definitely considering doing a postgrad, but obviously I want to see how the undergrad goes first. I'm not sure about how competitive the computing courses are at Sussex, but I imagine they get enough applications to only admit those with BBC and above - generally Sussex has grown massively in popularity over the past year - I think applications were up for 2005 by about 22%!
    Most universities offering a course in AI classify the degree as a BSc but for some reason Sussex chose BA. I did question this at my open day and the guy didn't explain it very well, but I think they decided on a BA to differentiate it from the Computer Science and AI degree which is a BSc. Funnily enough they are stopping entry to the AI degree in 2006 and changing it to 'Computing and AI', eventhough it will comprise (more or less) the same modules. I might end up graduating with 'Computing and AI' rather than AI as I am considering taking a gap year between year 2 and 3 to work in industry. Obviously with the broader degree title this would be pretty beneficial.
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    (Original post by ilovemonkeys)
    Yeah I am definitely considering doing a postgrad, but obviously I want to see how the undergrad goes first. I'm not sure about how competitive the computing courses are at Sussex, but I imagine they get enough applications to only admit those with BBC and above - generally Sussex has grown massively in popularity over the past year - I think applications were up for 2005 by about 22%!
    Most universities offering a course in AI classify the degree as a BSc but for some reason Sussex chose BA. I did question this at my open day and the guy didn't explain it very well, but I think they decided on a BA to differentiate it from the Computer Science and AI degree which is a BSc. Funnily enough they are stopping entry to the AI degree in 2006 and changing it to 'Computing and AI', eventhough it will comprise (more or less) the same modules. I might end up graduating with 'Computing and AI' rather than AI as I am considering taking a gap year between year 2 and 3 to work in industry. Obviously with the broader degree title this would be pretty beneficial.
    Woah, that is a massive increase!

    I think BA in computing type coruses have some kind of humanity/arts stuff in it. For instance, in AI, you can know how robots or humans think or something like (along the lines of those kinds of aspects).

    How could you have a 'Computing and AI' degree when you graduate, when you are going to do an AI? I thought if the course changes (i.e. from AI to Computing and AI), you will stick to the one you entered in that year of entry (i.e. AI for 2005 entry).

    I'm assuming that the 'computing and AI' degree is a combined/joint honours.

    Taking a gap year would be good. I'm not sure how many vaccancies are there for AI work though.
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    (Original post by trev)
    Woah, that is a massive increase!

    I think BA in computing type coruses have some kind of humanity/arts stuff in it. For instance, in AI, you can know how robots or humans think or something like (along the lines of those kinds of aspects).

    How could you have a 'Computing and AI' degree when you graduate, when you are going to do an AI? I thought if the course changes (i.e. from AI to Computing and AI), you will stick to the one you entered in that year of entry (i.e. AI for 2005 entry).

    I'm assuming that the 'computing and AI' degree is a combined/joint honours.

    Taking a gap year would be good. I'm not sure how many vaccancies are there for AI work though.
    Well, for the first two years I study the AI degree, then if I take a year out I will study the third year of Computing and AI and graduate with that title. I am able to do this because the modules available in the third year for Computing and AI are the same/or very similar to the AI degree. Computing and AI isn't joint honours, it's just a different degree title - the admissions tutor told me it was changing to attract more students to AI.

    I wouldn't necessarily look for AI work in my year in industry, for most AI work you need a masters degree anyway. I'd probably look for work involving expert systems or technical writing.

    The AI degree does include modules in philosophy, psychology and linguistics so I can only assume that's why they decided on the BA classification.
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    (Original post by ilovemonkeys)
    Well, for the first two years I study the AI degree, then if I take a year out I will study the third year of Computing and AI and graduate with that title. I am able to do this because the modules available in the third year for Computing and AI are the same/or very similar to the AI degree. Computing and AI isn't joint honours, it's just a different degree title - the admissions tutor told me it was changing to attract more students to AI.

    I wouldn't necessarily look for AI work in my year in industry, for most AI work you need a masters degree anyway. I'd probably look for work involving expert systems or technical writing.

    The AI degree does include modules in philosophy, psychology and linguistics so I can only assume that's why they decided on the BA classification.
    I understand why you can go into the 'computing and AI' degree now. How much maths does AI involve?

    You are getting me intersted in AI now. :p:

    Sounds like a good field to get into during your year out. How come you won't take a sandwich year instead? How much will you earn during your year out?

    How does philosophy and linguistics relate to AI? I know why psychology is related though.
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    (Original post by trev)
    I understand why you can go into the 'computing and AI' degree now. How much maths does AI involve?

    You are getting me intersted in AI now. :p:

    Sounds like a good field to get into during your year out. How come you won't take a sandwich year instead? How much will you earn during your year out?

    How does philosophy and linguistics relate to AI? I know why psychology is related though.
    AI involves a lot of complex maths - have a look at neural nets and you'll understand! I'm good at maths but it's not a subject I particularly like so I'm glad my course doesn't specify applicants have maths at A level - I imagine there will be a fair bit on the course but nothing too hard.

    My year out will be a sandwich year but it's not built into the course so I will have to organise it myself i.e. contact the companies directly. I don't know how much I will earn on my year out, it depends on the company and varies dramatically - one person I know worked for Sun and earned 30k whereas another friend worked for Intel and earned 15k!

    Philosophy is studied to determine the relationship between natural and artificial intelligence - i.e. 'can computers think?'

    Linguistics is studied for things like natural language processing and speech recognition.
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    (Original post by ilovemonkeys)
    AI involves a lot of complex maths - have a look at neural nets and you'll understand! I'm good at maths but it's not a subject I particularly like so I'm glad my course doesn't specify applicants have maths at A level - I imagine there will be a fair bit on the course but nothing too hard.

    My year out will be a sandwich year but it's not built into the course so I will have to organise it myself i.e. contact the companies directly. I don't know how much I will earn on my year out, it depends on the company and varies dramatically - one person I know worked for Sun and earned 30k whereas another friend worked for Intel and earned 15k!

    Philosophy is studied to determine the relationship between natural and artificial intelligence - i.e. 'can computers think?'

    Linguistics is studied for things like natural language processing and speech recognition.
    Are you going to do a thick or thin sandwich course? Sounds like a good salary for a year out. Does the sandwich year count towards your degree classification? What happens if you don't do well during the sandwich year, would you still get the salary or will the salary will be less? It seems that computing courser at Sussex don't have a 4 year sandwich course. Why is that?

    It seems that AI is the most complicated computing type course by the looks of it. I find the humanities/arts stuff (i.e. linguistic, psychology, and philosophy) quite interesting though.
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    (Original post by trev)
    Are you going to do a thick or thin sandwich course? Sounds like a good salary for a year out. Does the sandwich year count towards your degree classification? What happens if you don't do well during the sandwich year, would you still get the salary or will the salary will be less? It seems that computing courser at Sussex don't have a 4 year sandwich course. Why is that?

    It seems that AI is the most complicated computing type course by the looks of it. I find the humanities/arts stuff (i.e. linguistic, psychology, and philosophy) quite interesting though.
    To be honest I'm not completely of the difference between 'thick' and 'thin' sandwich courses! Sussex doesn't offer courses with a year in industry - I don't know why this is but it doesn't particularly bother me - I prefer to organise it myself. The work placement doesn't count towards my degree classification - most students don't take a year out, I'm only doing it because I think a work placement within a degree is very valuable when applying for jobs post graduation. AI is very complicated but I'm more interested in the psychology, philosophy and linguistics side rather than complex algorithms and neural nets. I was thinking about studying cognitive science instead but there wasn't enough computing in the course.
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    (Original post by ilovemonkeys)
    To be honest I'm not completely of the difference between 'thick' and 'thin' sandwich courses! Sussex doesn't offer courses with a year in industry - I don't know why this is but it doesn't particularly bother me - I prefer to organise it myself. The work placement doesn't count towards my degree classification - most students don't take a year out, I'm only doing it because I think a work placement within a degree is very valuable when applying for jobs post graduation. AI is very complicated but I'm more interested in the psychology, philosophy and linguistics side rather than complex algorithms and neural nets. I was thinking about studying cognitive science instead but there wasn't enough computing in the course.
    If Sussex have a course with a year industry, I'm sure you could still organise it yourself in some way though. I thought most uni's count the work placement towards your degree, as it's part of the course. Yeah, some students just want to quickly get over with the course and graduate. However, some of them might get experience after they graduate. I might consider a sandwich year, depends how things are going though. I just want it for the experience and money obviously. I heard that if you work in their company for a year in industry, you could have a better chance of working with them and get pernamently employed by them, is this true?

    What cognitive science again?
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    (Original post by trev)
    If Sussex have a course with a year industry, I'm sure you could still organise it yourself in some way though. I thought most uni's count the work placement towards your degree, as it's part of the course. Yeah, some students just want to quickly get over with the course and graduate. However, some of them might get experience after they graduate. I might consider a sandwich year, depends how things are going though. I just want it for the experience and money obviously. I heard that if you work in their company for a year in industry, you could have a better chance of working with them and get pernamently employed by them, is this true?

    What cognitive science again?
    mm, butting in! but i'm going to sussex in september and my brother is just finishing his masters in artificial intelligence there at the moment!

    i'm currently doing a year in industry (through the official scheme) before i start uni. and to answer your question, if you work well for a company of course it will work in your favour if you apply for a job when yuo graduate - they will have personal experience of you, you'll know how the company works (safety policies etc) so will save them money in training.
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    (Original post by allisandro)
    mm, butting in! but i'm going to sussex in september and my brother is just finishing his masters in artificial intelligence there at the moment!

    i'm currently doing a year in industry (through the official scheme) before i start uni. and to answer your question, if you work well for a company of course it will work in your favour if you apply for a job when yuo graduate - they will have personal experience of you, you'll know how the company works (safety policies etc) so will save them money in training.
    Cool. Did he enjoy the course there? Did he do AI as his first degree? Sometimes people can do an MSc in AI when they have other types of computing degrees.

    I'm assuming you are doing AI in sussex too in september.

    Sounds good. I might do a a year in industry for my degree course. I might want to work with them again, as I will have a chance of working with them again, since I work there during my placement.
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    (Original post by trev)
    Cool. Did he enjoy the course there? Did he do AI as his first degree? Sometimes people can do an MSc in AI when they have other types of computing degrees.

    I'm assuming you are doing AI in sussex too in september.

    Sounds good. I might do a a year in industry for my degree course. I might want to work with them again, as I will have a chance of working with them again, since I work there during my placement.
    you assume wrong - i'm doing human sciences.

    he didn't even do a computing related degree - he did politics and development studies at soas, then a masters in african politics and social sciences at edinburgh. then he worked for a few years at LSE sorting out their oracle database, did his maths a level for fun, then applied and got full fundnig for the EASy MSc at sussex :rolleyes: he's always been into comptuers and played abou with them though.

    he is hoping to start a PhD in neuroscience-y AI-y stuff at goldsmiths in september.
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    (Original post by allisandro)
    you assume wrong - i'm doing human sciences.

    he didn't even do a computing related degree - he did politics and development studies at soas, then a masters in african politics and social sciences at edinburgh. then he worked for a few years at LSE sorting out their oracle database, did his maths a level for fun, then applied and got full fundnig for the EASy MSc at sussex :rolleyes: he's always been into comptuers and played abou with them though.

    he is hoping to start a PhD in neuroscience-y AI-y stuff at goldsmiths in september.
    Ok, lol. I assumed wrong then. Sussex is good for human sciences too.

    Woah, your brother is very smart! Hope I was smart as him. I'm assuming he's doing a conversion degree at Sussex. How old is your brother by the way?
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    (Original post by trev)
    Ok, lol. I assumed wrong then. Sussex is good for human sciences too.

    Woah, your brother is very smart! Hope I was smart as him. I'm assuming he's doing a conversion degree at Sussex. How old is your brother by the way?
    he's 28. what do you mean a conversion degree? he's just doing a one year masters.
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    (Original post by allisandro)
    he's 28. what do you mean a conversion degree? he's just doing a one year masters.

    A conversion degree is when a person wants to do a masters degree in a different field from an undergrad.
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    (Original post by trev)
    A conversion degree is when a person wants to do a masters degree in a different field from an undergrad.
    well he didn't do one for this. i assume it was because he had enough relevant experience.
 
 
 
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