Will Psychology at A level help me decide whether I want to study it further?

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Ami78
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I've heard that Psychology at a University level is vastly different and that enjoying it at A level does not necessarily mean I will enjoy doing it on a degree level. Is that true?
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Hi Ami78,

I didn't study psychology at A-Level, but hopefully I can still give you some perspective that might be useful.

I studied Politics, Sociology and Philosophy at A-Level - I enjoyed thinking about world we live in, in terms of people as individuals and within the wider structures and context. The fact that I enjoyed these types of topics meant that I've really enjoyed my course. Psychology at university covers a broad spectrum of area's, but there's also room for you to explore the things that interest you through your assignment's, interactions with your tutors and your final year research project. The depth is probably very different to A-Level psychology and way that you learn about certain topics, the critical thought and evaluation is probably quite different.

Depending on the type of content you're interested in learning about, and the type of skill's you like using e.g. essay writing, critical evaluation, lots of reading etc. will determine how you're likely to feel about the course at degree level.

I hope this makes sense!
- Rebecca, 3rd Year Psychology Student
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McGinger
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Psychology at Uni level is very much a STEM subject.

Btw, just be aware that an undergraduate degree in Psyc does not make you 'a Psychologist'.
You will need a Masters degree, a PhD and a great deal of relevant experience - https://www.prospects.ac.uk/job-prof...l-psychologist There are not enough graduate/lower level jobs and its a very overcrowded field.

You might like to look at degree courses in Counselling, Mental Health Nursing, Social Work, Teaching or Education - there are far more graduate opportunities in these areas.
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(Original post by McGinger)
Psychology at Uni level is very much a STEM subject.

Btw, just be aware that an undergraduate degree in Psyc does not make you 'a Psychologist'.
You will need a Masters degree, a PhD and a great deal of relevant experience - https://www.prospects.ac.uk/job-prof...l-psychologist There are not enough graduate/lower level jobs and its a very overcrowded field.

You might like to look at degree courses in Counselling, Mental Health Nursing, Social Work, Teaching or Education - there are far more graduate opportunities in these areas.
With Psychology being a science, there are scientific/mathematical elements - mainly cognitive and biological psychology, quantitative research methods and statistics which is done using software. However Psychology as a study is so broad and encompasses a lot, therefore most universities reflect that in their modules and teaching. For instance, social psychology includes a lot of sociological elements, consciousness studies are heavily influenced by philosophy etc. I say this to say, if anyone is considering Psychology but doesn't particularly enjoy what we often perceive as 'traditional' science and maths content, it shouldn't put them off considering psychology as an option.

As mentioned above, it is definitely worth noting that an undergraduate degree doesn't make you a Psychologist - you will need to do further study. However the further study needed and the requirement's vary greatly depending on the type of Psychologist you want to become e.g. Forensic Psychologist, Counselling Psychologist, Educational Psychologist, and the university programme you're applying for. For instance, some PhD programmes for counselling psychology don't require a Masters, they just require a BPS accredited undergraduate degree (it's really important to make sure you look for courses that are BPS accredited, otherwise you'll have to do a conversion masters) and a minimum of a years relevant work experience where you can demonstrate the use of counselling skills. The BPS have a page with loads of information about what different psychologist's do and what it takes to become one - https://careers.bps.org.uk. Study psychology is a really good basis for the area's mentioned by the individual above, and also area's such as marketing, HR, UX Design.

Ami78 hopefully this additional information is helpful in your decision!

-Rebecca, 3rd Year Psychology Student
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