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Should I do a degree in biomedical science

Hi, I am currectly a yr 13 student. I really enjoy biology A level. my favourite topics are homeostasis, nervous coordination and anything to do with the circulatory system. I am not sure what job I would like in the future. I don't want to study medicine because I think that it's too much commitment. I can only think of biomedical sciences but people are saying that I shouldn't do it as it is too competitive. I also hate learning about stem cells during a level biology

Do you think biomedical science is right for me?
(edited 2 years ago)
Original post by muhammad0112
Hi, I am currectly a yr 13 student. I really enjoy biology A level. my favourite topics are homeostasis, nervous coordination and anything to do with the circulatory system. I am not sure what job I would like in the future. I don't want to study medicine because I think that it's too much commitment. I can only think of biomedical sciences but people are saying that I shouldn't do it as it is too competitive. I also hate learning about stem cells during a level biology

Do you think biomedical science is right for me?

You've picked out some very specific topics here, but you'd need to be prepared to study a wide range of topics in a biomedical science degree - included many which will be uninteresting or, frankly, boring to you. All degrees are like this - no-one enjoys every part of their degree, and it's the overall balance and finding some areas particularly interesting which carries people through.

Have a look at a few uni websites which you might like to study at and look at the 'course information/structure' pages of a biomedical degree - this will give you a good idea of the sort of topics you would be studying.
Reply 2
Biomed is, I'm pretty sure, fairly laboratory based as the general idea is it's aimed at people wanting to become biomedical scientists. Of course, you don't have to become a biomed scientist, but you obviously have to be happy with the idea of lab work.

Have a look around at some other bioscience degrees - biology, biochem, medical sciences, and many more I'm sure I can't think of.

Alternatively, have a think about why you're going to uni. It's expensive, so my advice would be to only go if you know what you want to study and why you want to study it. Don't go just because your school or college are pushing you to go, or because all your friends are going.
Original post by muhammad0112
Hi, I am currectly a yr 13 student. I really enjoy biology A level. my favourite topics are homeostasis, nervous coordination and anything to do with the circulatory system. I am not sure what job I would like in the future. I don't want to study medicine because I think that it's too much commitment. I can only think of biomedical sciences but people are saying that I shouldn't do it as it is too competitive. I also hate learning about stem cells during a level biology

Do you think biomedical science is right for me?


I'd say if it's the competition you're worried about then you might want to apply for pharmacology. It's one of the most similar courses to biomedical science but doesn't have the same number of people applying to it. In fact it's so similar, many universities will allow biomed students to switch over to pharmacology after their first year because the year 1 course for both biomed and pharmacology is pretty much identical.

It also might suit you to do a life science degree or biochemistry degree. Biomedical science is classed as a life science degree so other life science degrees are probably similar.

I've applied for biomedical science this year but I've also applied for medical microbiology at Bristol which has a similar course structure to biomed.

Also you may want to consider a degree in neuroscience. I feel like that would cover lots of your favourite parts of your biology A-level so that would definitely be worth looking at.
Original post by PAR2MED
Biomed is, I'm pretty sure, fairly laboratory based as the general idea is it's aimed at people wanting to become biomedical scientists. Of course, you don't have to become a biomed scientist, but you obviously have to be happy with the idea of lab work.

Have a look around at some other bioscience degrees - biology, biochem, medical sciences, and many more I'm sure I can't think of.

Alternatively, have a think about why you're going to uni. It's expensive, so my advice would be to only go if you know what you want to study and why you want to study it. Don't go just because your school or college are pushing you to go, or because all your friends are going.

I hate lab work so that would be a problem
Original post by LollyLoux
I'd say if it's the competition you're worried about then you might want to apply for pharmacology. It's one of the most similar courses to biomedical science but doesn't have the same number of people applying to it. In fact it's so similar, many universities will allow biomed students to switch over to pharmacology after their first year because the year 1 course for both biomed and pharmacology is pretty much identical.

It also might suit you to do a life science degree or biochemistry degree. Biomedical science is classed as a life science degree so other life science degrees are probably similar.

I've applied for biomedical science this year but I've also applied for medical microbiology at Bristol which has a similar course structure to biomed.

Also you may want to consider a degree in neuroscience. I feel like that would cover lots of your favourite parts of your biology A-level so that would definitely be worth looking at.

Neuroscience look like a really interesting course, but the issue is that I don't think it would have alot of job prospects
Original post by muhammad0112
Neuroscience look like a really interesting course, but the issue is that I don't think it would have alot of job prospects

https://www.bristol.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/2022/neuroscience/msci-neuroscience-industry/ This should probably help with that. I'm sure a lot of other universities do a course like this, Bristol was just the first one I could find. If you do a course that offers work experience / a year in the industry then you'll spend time working with a company related to your degree. Many people have received job offers from their work placement through their degree. Even if it doesn't provide you with a job offer, it still provides you with experience and knowledge of the different fields you can work in so you'll be a much favourable applicant over other people when you apply for a job after your degree. Hope it helps :smile:
Reply 7
Original post by muhammad0112
I hate lab work so that would be a problem

Yeah, biomed might not be the one.

Have you considered an apprenticeship, or work? If you're not sure what you want to study. You can always go to uni later. I didn't go until I was 21 (and I was nowhere near the oldest in my course!) And I'm looking at going again now, in my late 20s. There's no time limit.
Original post by muhammad0112
Hi, I am currectly a yr 13 student. I really enjoy biology A level. my favourite topics are homeostasis, nervous coordination and anything to do with the circulatory system. I am not sure what job I would like in the future. I don't want to study medicine because I think that it's too much commitment. I can only think of biomedical sciences but people are saying that I shouldn't do it as it is too competitive. I also hate learning about stem cells during a level biology

Do you think biomedical science is right for me?

Hi @muhammad0112

Everything you have listed there sounds along the lines of a Biology/Biomed degree! Personally, I would advise you not to think about the competition, in an application the key things they look for are not only your grades but passion for a subject which it sounds like you have. The competition is not the same as medicine. In addition, not all universities will require an interview to be offered a place. If you have two science A-levels, Southampton University will not require you to do an interview for a biological sciences course.

A biomed/biological sciences degree is a great option too if you don't know what you want to do after graduating. I am a Biology student and I was in the same boat as you. With a biological sciences degree you can go into almost anything - NHS, clinical research, pharmaceutical industry (ie marketing or clinical trials), teaching, science communication, research/academia and much much more! A great way to find out what you enjoy is to also do a year in employment or a summer internship. I did a year in employment at Pfizer and it has really helped shape where I want to go after graduating and identify what skills I want to use daily in a job.

At Southampton, whilst I have learnt about stem cells, these were during my optional modules. So if you really want to avoid them it is possible - but I would advise to keep an open mind on topics you were unsure about during A levels. Personally, I didn't enjoy genetics at A-level however university has shone a different light on what genetics is and its wider implication in disease etc.

Have you looked at universities and courses? Each course is different so if you know you want to learn about certain topics have a look at compulsory and optional modules on offer at each uni.

Lauren
(BSc Biology Student)
Original post by muhammad0112
Hi, I am currectly a yr 13 student. I really enjoy biology A level. my favourite topics are homeostasis, nervous coordination and anything to do with the circulatory system. I am not sure what job I would like in the future. I don't want to study medicine because I think that it's too much commitment. I can only think of biomedical sciences but people are saying that I shouldn't do it as it is too competitive. I also hate learning about stem cells during a level biology

Do you think biomedical science is right for me?

Hey,

I am a current 3rd year natural sciences student at the university of Nottingham.
Natural sciences might be a good course for you to consider if you like a range of things.
Different unis structure their natural sciences degrees differently but at Nottingham you study 3 subjects in first year then 2 in your second and third year.

I personally study Biology and Psychology, with Chemistry in my first year. I take modules focused on neuroscience and disease. This course gives you a bit more flexibility in modules when compared to a straight science course. There is also the option to study subjects you have never studied before. Prior to uni I had never studied psychology. Other subjects you do not need any experience in are: cancer sciences, archaeology, ecosystems and environment and earth sciences. Quite a few people I know took one of these subjects in first year just to try something new.

I have left a link below to the webpage if it sounds like something you might be interested in.
If you have any questions just let me know,
Emily :smile:

https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/ugstudy/course/Natural-Sciences-BSc
Original post by EmilyClarke24
Hey,

I am a current 3rd year natural sciences student at the university of Nottingham.
Natural sciences might be a good course for you to consider if you like a range of things.
Different unis structure their natural sciences degrees differently but at Nottingham you study 3 subjects in first year then 2 in your second and third year.

I personally study Biology and Psychology, with Chemistry in my first year. I take modules focused on neuroscience and disease. This course gives you a bit more flexibility in modules when compared to a straight science course. There is also the option to study subjects you have never studied before. Prior to uni I had never studied psychology. Other subjects you do not need any experience in are: cancer sciences, archaeology, ecosystems and environment and earth sciences. Quite a few people I know took one of these subjects in first year just to try something new.

I have left a link below to the webpage if it sounds like something you might be interested in.
If you have any questions just let me know,
Emily :smile:

https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/ugstudy/course/Natural-Sciences-BSc

I was also going to suggest this. I'm a yr 2 natural sciences student at UCL focusing on organic chemistry and biomed, but there are many combinations you can take. There were also neuroscience and psychology, maths and stats, physics, earth sciences, etc options.
I also left a link below :smile:

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/undergraduate/degrees/natural-sciences-bsc
Hey @muhammad0112 :smile:

Just wanted to check in and see how you were doing and whether you'd come up with a decision yet as to whether you want to study Biomedical Science or not?

I thought it would be best for you to speak to some Biomedical Science students directly and find out what it's really like studying the subject, you can chat to some of our current students directly here.

If you'd like to read some other student stories about their experience studying Biomedical Science or see the different roles some of our recent graduates have taken then you can do so here :thumbsup:

Good luck with everything!!

Becky

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