MSJo221
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#1
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#1
Is a level textiles worth it, do universities like it and what is the coursework like? Also, if you took textiles at GCSE, is it similar or different?
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PinkSmoothie
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#2
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Hi, for AQA A level textiles, it is quite similar to GCSE but you get more time to experiment with different techniques. the exam is 15 hours instead of the 10 hours for GCSE. Coursework is similar to GCSE again but you have to put more effort in I suppose.
I am currently doing A level textiles and it is quite fun if you enjoy the subject.
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MSJo221
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Thank you 😊
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PinkSmoothie
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#4
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(Original post by MSJo221)
Thank you 😊
No worries
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Uni of Southampton Students
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#5
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(Original post by MSJo221)
Is a level textiles worth it, do universities like it and what is the coursework like? Also, if you took textiles at GCSE, is it similar or different?
Hi there!
I did A level Textiles and GCSE Textiles, and I would say they are similar but of course the A level is just more ramped up in terms of the workload. The course work consisted of being given project briefs and then working on lots of different experiments with fabrics to come up with a suitable outcome. We were always encouraged to do as much exploration as possible with different techniques, and then we would be able to chose a commercial garment pattern to use to create a piece of clothing or outfit using the textiles. I know that there was also the option of creating fabric suitable for interiors and accessories as well.
As mentioned already, there was a 15 hour exam at the end of the course, but most of your final grade would still be made up from course work done along the way, and we did our development in sketchbooks, then created presentation boards with the key pieces on, which I directly used in my University portfolio which made it a lot easier!
I think I would say you definitely do need to be interested in and committed to the subject to get the most out of A level textiles, as it is a lot of work and can be quite demanding when you have other subjects to work on alongside it. However I really enjoyed it and I learnt techniques in that time that I am still able to utilize now!
If you are interested in continuing with a degree in an art/textiles/fashion based subject then universities will definitely appreciate you having done A level textiles. It can also help you create a lot of work for your portfolio which as I mentioned before, is really helpful for when you get to the point of university interviews!
Do you have an idea of what you might want to do in the future?
Anna (2nd year Fashion Design student)
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SherlocksMa
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#6
(Original post by Uni of Southampton Students)
Hi there!
I did A level Textiles and GCSE Textiles, and I would say they are similar but of course the A level is just more ramped up in terms of the workload. The course work consisted of being given project briefs and then working on lots of different experiments with fabrics to come up with a suitable outcome. We were always encouraged to do as much exploration as possible with different techniques, and then we would be able to chose a commercial garment pattern to use to create a piece of clothing or outfit using the textiles. I know that there was also the option of creating fabric suitable for interiors and accessories as well.
As mentioned already, there was a 15 hour exam at the end of the course, but most of your final grade would still be made up from course work done along the way, and we did our development in sketchbooks, then created presentation boards with the key pieces on, which I directly used in my University portfolio which made it a lot easier!
I think I would say you definitely do need to be interested in and committed to the subject to get the most out of A level textiles, as it is a lot of work and can be quite demanding when you have other subjects to work on alongside it. However I really enjoyed it and I learnt techniques in that time that I am still able to utilize now!
If you are interested in continuing with a degree in an art/textiles/fashion based subject then universities will definitely appreciate you having done A level textiles. It can also help you create a lot of work for your portfolio which as I mentioned before, is really helpful for when you get to the point of university interviews!
Do you have an idea of what you might want to do in the future?
Anna (2nd year Fashion Design student)
Anna - are you at Winchester School
Of Art? If so just wondered what it’s like as we’re visiting for an open day this weekend.
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MSJo221
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#7
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#7
Hi Anna, thank you so much for this really insightful response. In answer to your question, I have a few ideas as to where I’d like to go post-18, some of which more directly involve textiles (i.e. costume design or painting restoration) but others of which don’t (midwifery or English lit at uni). As that’s quite a mixed bag, my plan is to take subjects which keep my options open for any of these courses, so something like A level biology, english lit and textiles. Do you think that if I ended up going down the route of something non-textiles related, universities would still be okay with textiles as one of my options for A level?
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Uni of Southampton Students
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#8
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#8
(Original post by SherlocksMa)
Anna - are you at Winchester School
Of Art? If so just wondered what it’s like as we’re visiting for an open day this weekend.
Hello!

Apologies for the late response!

Whilst I did not do textiles a level I study Textiles at the Winchester School of Art, so if you have any questions then please feel to ask away!

All the best with your decisions,

Maeve ☺️
BA Textiles Design
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Uni of Southampton Students
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#9
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#9
(Original post by MSJo221)
Hi Anna, thank you so much for this really insightful response. In answer to your question, I have a few ideas as to where I’d like to go post-18, some of which more directly involve textiles (i.e. costume design or painting restoration) but others of which don’t (midwifery or English lit at uni). As that’s quite a mixed bag, my plan is to take subjects which keep my options open for any of these courses, so something like A level biology, english lit and textiles. Do you think that if I ended up going down the route of something non-textiles related, universities would still be okay with textiles as one of my options for A level?
Hi again,
I am so glad my response was useful for you!
In regards to your question, I think this really depends on individual courses at University, for example some do ask for very specific A levels and therefore are more likely to only accept candidates with these requirements. However, there are definitely courses where you would be completely fine to have textiles as a subject even if it is not what you actually end up doing. My advice would be to have a look into Midwifery and English lit courses at a few different universities and see what they are asking for as entry requirements. You should be able to find this information online if you search for the course and have a look at their descriptions. This should hopefully give you a clearer idea of what you will end up needing to have when it comes to choosing your course.
Keeping your options open is definitely a great idea at this stage, as there is still plenty of time to work out what you really want to do! If you do end up more interested in costume design etc. I would also say textiles would definitely give you a really good starting point and knowledge base for that, so if you find that you are able to take it without shutting off your other ideas then I would definitely recommend it.

Anna (2nd Year Fashion Design student)
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MSJo221
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#10
Report Thread starter 2 months ago
#10
Thank you, I’ll definitely look into some unis to see what their entry requirements are 😊
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