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Chemistry at university

Hello, I was thinking of taking chemistry at university as I really enjoy it. My current a-levels are biology, chemistry and french. I feel like I won’t get in as I don’t take a level maths and I only got a 6 in GCSE maths. However they were predicted grades and I got 7s in bio and chem yet I’m currently getting A's in exams. I don’t know what to do, please help.
Reply 1
Somebody in my A-level chemistry class went on to study Chemistry at university, and is currently studying for a PhD (last I checked), and he didn't have Maths A-level (nor was it a particularly strong subject for him at GCSE! I suspect he got a B or C, which is the same as a 6 or 5 I think).
There may be some universities that require mathematics, but not all of them.

If you can get a good grade at A-level chemistry, you're in with a good chance.
Most unis don't require A-level Maths for entry to a chemistry degree. However, as with all sciences, chemistry is necessarily mathematical at degree level (the artificial divide between maths and the sciences in school is just that - artificial). Chemistry is also reasonably mathematical in its own right, so you do need to be able and willing to learn more maths and do a fair bit of mathematical work. If you don't have A-level Maths you will usually take a module or two in first year covering the content of A-level Maths (and some topics from further maths) to prepare you for the content of the degree (particularly physical chemistry).

@CheeseIsVeg might be able to offer some advice about chemistry at uni and the mathematical content of it?
(edited 2 years ago)
I’m doing chemistry at oxford and there’s LOADS of maths. At my school, you had to get at least an 8 to even do chemistry A level. Being blunt, I’d probably pick another degree, what about biochemistry? I’m guessing that’s less maths based.
Reply 4
I’m doing chemistry bsc and I didn’t do maths a level :smile: usually they’ll just run an extra module for people who didn’t do a level maths to catch them up so don’t worry if you don’t have it
Maths A level is not usually a requirement - and GCSE grade 6 will be enough for most courses.

Bristol - https://www.bristol.ac.uk/chemistry/courses/undergraduate/ - AAA including Chemistry, GCSE Maths grade 6.
Sheffield - https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/chemistry/undergraduate/courses - AAB including Chemistry, GCSE Maths grade 6.
Lancaster - https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/chemistry/study/undergraduate/ - ABB including Chemistry and another science or maths, GCSE Maths grade 6.
Strathclyde - https://www.strath.ac.uk/science/chemistry/studywithus/undergraduatecourses/ - BBB including Chemistry, and one of Maths, Physics or Biology.
Etc etc.
Original post by McGinger
Maths A level is not usually a requirement - and GCSE grade 6 will be enough for most courses.

Bristol - https://www.bristol.ac.uk/chemistry/courses/undergraduate/ - AAA including Chemistry, GCSE Maths grade 6.
Sheffield - https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/chemistry/undergraduate/courses - AAB including Chemistry, GCSE Maths grade 6.
Lancaster - https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/chemistry/study/undergraduate/ - ABB including Chemistry and another science or maths, GCSE Maths grade 6.
Strathclyde - https://www.strath.ac.uk/science/chemistry/studywithus/undergraduatecourses/ - BBB including Chemistry, and one of Maths, Physics or Biology.
Etc etc.

Okay, that’s reassuring thank you :smile:
Original post by Josiegotswag
Hello, I was thinking of taking chemistry at university as I really enjoy it. My current a-levels are biology, chemistry and french. I feel like I won’t get in as I don’t take a level maths and I only got a 6 in GCSE maths. However they were predicted grades and I got 7s in bio and chem yet I’m currently getting A's in exams. I don’t know what to do, please help.

Hiya :hi:
I have a thread where I answer loads of questions about what a chemistry degree is like here: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showpost.php?p=95243872&postcount=67
I would recommend you read it and then if you have any more specific questions feel free to tag me!
I graduated from an MChem degree last year :yy:

For maths in a chemistry degree:
In first year you're talking differentiation, integration, rearranging equations, basic physics concepts and some unit work.

After this, second year steps up a bit with quantum mechanics. This is more complex numbers, matrices and operator mathematics. The support in workshops/tutorials is there.

A-level maths definitely gives you an advantage (so does physics) but your University should teach you and provide the support you need through workshops/tutorials. I actually really enjoyed the maths part and learned a few new concepts because I did not do A level further maths.

Hope this helps,
Cheese

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