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bigpineapple
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Hello guys, now i'm coming on here to ask for a bit of advice really...
I've come to the conclusion that i would like to go into the highly competitive career that is acting. I love to act. Simple really. I get such a kick out of it and could not think of anything else i would like to do after leaving 6th form. I believe that, from the responses that i'm getting to do with the quality of my acting, i would like to go to Drama School. However, how realistic is this?
I come from a "working class family" of sorts and aren't too "flush" (lets put it that way!) so money it seems, will be a problem... Unlike university i've heard that it's incredibly hard to get funding and along with this, most drama schools don't have accomidation to house you leaving you to fork out the money for a place of your own (which is of course, somewhat understandable as places like the old vic only take in a handful of students a year).
Now i'm only in AS at the moment (with a predicted A in theatre studies so i'm not exactly... bad so to speak. i do have some ability.) and don't even know how i would go about applying to drama schools... do you do it through UCAS? i really don't know..... And finally, i don't know how i measure up to the nationwide talent. I don't know, even though i'm good in my school, would i be good enough against the rest? i don't know, YET - i have heard that there are these things you can go to to get feedback from judges. Does anybody know anything of this?
Anyway, sorry that was long, but i really do appreciate the time taken to read it and much anticipate your feedback so in a nutshell - How do you fund it, how is accomidation and how does anybody know of any judging workshops.... Thanks very much guys
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Mr. Mortell
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Grades don't really matter to Drama schools. What they want is experience. Unless you're really good, and I mean REALLY good, they won't even look at you until you're about 21. To clarify an 'A' as AS-level doesn't mean that you're good enough [not to say that you're not good enough, but just saying you've got an A doesn't really help much!]. I got full marks in my performances for AS and A level and I'm still not anywhere near the level they expect from an Actor.

Some Drama schools [LIPA, CSSD] go through UCAS, others have seperate admissions policys. If you're seriously interested check out http://www.ncdt.co.uk/ note that some are funded [i.e. you can get student loans &c.] and some aren't. Read carefully!
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Aiko
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Firstly, I suggest visiting the website for both the National Council for Drama Training (NCDT) and the Conference of Drama Schools:

http://www.ncdt.co.uk/
http://www.drama.ac.uk/

You can download this PDF detailing everything you need to know about drama school entry:

http://sites.stocksphere.com/cds/fil...2009%20web.pdf

I would also suggest reading Simon Dunmore's advice:

http://www.btinternet.com/~simon.dun...drama_scho.htm

I hate pasting a long list but here's the twenty two accredited institutions:

Academy of Live and Recorded Arts
The Arts Educational Schools (ArtsEd)
Birmingham School of Acting
Bristol Old Vic Theatre School
Central School of Speech and Drama
Guildford School of Acting (GSA)
Cygnet Training Theatre
Drama Centre London
Drama Studio London
East 15
Guildhall School of Music and Drama
Italia Conti Academy
Liverpool Institute for Performing Arts (LIPA)
London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art (LAMDA)
Manchester Met University (Theatre Department)
Mountview Academy of Theatre Arts
Oxford School of Drama
Queen Margaret University
Rose Bruford College
Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA)
Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama
Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama

It's important to consider accredited 'acting' courses, not drama. These courses are offered by drama schools across the country. Accreditation is important because it's recognised internationally by the industry and you'll gain full equity status upon graduation (an important factor to consider for a professional actor).

I'm going to be honest, drama School entry isn't easy, in fact, it's probably the hardest area in education to get into. For instance, the Central School of Speech and Drama, receives averagely around 4000 applicants for a 32 placement course, of which there are separate pathways of around 16. So, technically, you're competing with 4000 people for around 16 places. Fortunately the 22 accredited drama schools vary in levels of acceptance. East 15, for example, another accredited school, may receive around 1000 for 58 places, which is still very competitive, but not as much. You'll have to undergo an intensive audition process that comprises numerous recalls and an interview before acceptance. This could potentially span many months.

In regard to finance/funding, many of the drama schools are associated with larger universities. For example, East 15 is associated with the University of Essex, Central School of Speech and Drama is a constituent college of the University of London and the Drama Centre London is part of Central Saint Martins, which is also part of the University of the Arts London. This is good because they're all maintained. In other words, they're government funded and are just like every other course at university with the standard yearly fees (£3000+). The private schools such as RADA and LAMDA are also linked with larger universities and charge similar fees. As a matter of fact, out of the 22 accredited schools, the majority are maintained by the government like any other course. There are only a few that are not, so don't worry. It's about £35-45 for an audition to each of these schools. Accommodation is usually offered by the schools, especially those that are associated with larger universities. If not, they will provide a system to help search for private housing.
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bigpineapple
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thanks very much you two - i'll rep you Mr.Mortell tomorrow
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Aiko
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You're very welcome. If you have any further inquiries regarding drama school entry be assured to ask. I had to edit my original post because I noticed I had only added 21 accredited schools, excluding Manchester Met. It's been added. :p:

My knowledge stems from working with casting directors, theatre managers and helping my friend (of whom is currently at RADA) onto her course. I attended many of the Open Days during this period.
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beccaarr
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If you're serious about audition for drama schools, make sure you are completely prepared for whatever they throw at you. The two times I auditioned were stupidly stressful for me and I think I went through every emotion there is.
As Matisse said, auditions cost, so you need to think carefully about where you try for. Also take into account travel, accommodation (some auditions start first thing and last all day, so you might have to stay over in places).
Since you're only doing AS, be ready for rejection. I was told twice by GSA I was young. When it came to re-calls for a couple of places, the youngest person getting through was 20. But don't let that put you off, there are those who are lucky enough.

I'd apply to uni courses are aswell as schools. And also different styles of drama to give yourself more options (if you have room to) if acting doesn't work out. I originally applied for acting but second time round I got told twice to try Contemporary Theatre. Which is what I'm doing now and I absorlutely love it.

Hope that was helpful!
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Aiko
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Beccaarr is absolutely right, age is a factor to consider. Generally they tend to averagely accept applicants that are slightly older. This is partly because of the acquired experience and maturity of the applicants. It's also because many are not accepted the first time around and reapply the following year(s). Many also 'use' to apply after their first degree in another subject (however, with the recent decision from the government to not provide financial support for a second degree, this rarely happens anymore).

Something I failed to mention is that preparation is key. You will need to be well versed in the speeches you've chosen, both Shakespeare and your Contemporary. Many suggest hiring an audition coach during this period and allowing a few months for practice, ideally. Of course this varies from person to person.
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bigpineapple
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all this information is really helping me. i thank you all again!
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francescarella
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(Original post by bigpineapple)
all this information is really helping me. i thank you all again!
hello

i go to a drama school (see signature)

basically all i can say is from personal experience and from what i know about life as a drama school student.

i too am from a "working class" background from manchester. for Central a bout 4000 people apply for 16 pl;aces on acting. there are three acting courses here (musical theatre, stage an screen, collaborative and devised theatre. central processes it's applciations through UCAS, and has an audition and two recalls. when drama schools create a new class, they do so by casting it. that is, they will have about 5 leading men and women, 5 character actors of men and women, and then about 2 men and women with a quirk to their look or acting ability that will get them the more obscure roles.

i have ben told personally by the RSC that they don;t employ people (or very rarely do) from outside the top 6 drama schools. i would say that if you are going to apply for a drama school. aim high, as it is the only way you can be sure to make the right contacts.
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beccaarr
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(Original post by francescarella)
i have ben told personally by the RSC that they don;t employ people (or very rarely do) from outside the top 6 drama schools.
I've heard that before. It suprised me, but at the same time didn't. If that makes sense.

Just go for it. Apply for the top places, you won't know unless you try. But I'd seriously put a few other course down just to be safe. You can always turn them down if you want a year out to try again. But you have to think logically. I tried twice then went to a uni instead because there was no way I could've afforded to go through the whole process again. But I do sometimes wonder what would've happened if I had tried a third time (though like I said, I love the course I'm doing now). But you can go on and on thinking that next time could be it. Its a stupidly tough business to get into and after a certain point you take the chances you are given.
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bigpineapple
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thanks for all the advice, it really is helping me think this all out. I'm most probably going to speek to my drama teacher later on in the year and see if she thinks i should carry on and get a rough understanding of my ability. anywhom, thanks guys
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Lenakheroua
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out of sheer curiosity, did you get in anywhere?x
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joey4200
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I would also like to know if you were successful!
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lilymayxo
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(Original post by francescarella)
hello

i go to a drama school (see signature)

basically all i can say is from personal experience and from what i know about life as a drama school student.

i too am from a "working class" background from manchester. for Central a bout 4000 people apply for 16 pl;aces on acting. there are three acting courses here (musical theatre, stage an screen, collaborative and devised theatre. central processes it's applciations through UCAS, and has an audition and two recalls. when drama schools create a new class, they do so by casting it. that is, they will have about 5 leading men and women, 5 character actors of men and women, and then about 2 men and women with a quirk to their look or acting ability that will get them the more obscure roles.

i have ben told personally by the RSC that they don;t employ people (or very rarely do) from outside the top 6 drama schools. i would say that if you are going to apply for a drama school. aim high, as it is the only way you can be sure to make the right contacts.
Hey, you mentioned they rarely employ outside of the top 6 drama schools. What are these?
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lilymayxo
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(Original post by Aiko)
Firstly, I suggest visiting the website for both the National Council for Drama Training (NCDT) and the Conference of Drama Schools:

http://www.ncdt.co.uk/
http://www.drama.ac.uk/

You can download this PDF detailing everything you need to know about drama school entry:

http://sites.stocksphere.com/cds/fil...2009%20web.pdf

I would also suggest reading Simon Dunmore's advice:

http://www.btinternet.com/~simon.dun...drama_scho.htm

I hate pasting a long list but here's the twenty two accredited institutions:

Academy of Live and Recorded Arts
The Arts Educational Schools (ArtsEd)
Birmingham School of Acting
Bristol Old Vic Theatre School
Central School of Speech and Drama
Guildford School of Acting (GSA)
Cygnet Training Theatre
Drama Centre London
Drama Studio London
East 15
Guildhall School of Music and Drama
Italia Conti Academy
Liverpool Institute for Performing Arts (LIPA)
London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art (LAMDA)
Manchester Met University (Theatre Department)
Mountview Academy of Theatre Arts
Oxford School of Drama
Queen Margaret University
Rose Bruford College
Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA)
Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama
Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama

It's important to consider accredited 'acting' courses, not drama. These courses are offered by drama schools across the country. Accreditation is important because it's recognised internationally by the industry and you'll gain full equity status upon graduation (an important factor to consider for a professional actor).

I'm going to be honest, drama School entry isn't easy, in fact, it's probably the hardest area in education to get into. For instance, the Central School of Speech and Drama, receives averagely around 4000 applicants for a 32 placement course, of which there are separate pathways of around 16. So, technically, you're competing with 4000 people for around 16 places. Fortunately the 22 accredited drama schools vary in levels of acceptance. East 15, for example, another accredited school, may receive around 1000 for 58 places, which is still very competitive, but not as much. You'll have to undergo an intensive audition process that comprises numerous recalls and an interview before acceptance. This could potentially span many months.

In regard to finance/funding, many of the drama schools are associated with larger universities. For example, East 15 is associated with the University of Essex, Central School of Speech and Drama is a constituent college of the University of London and the Drama Centre London is part of Central Saint Martins, which is also part of the University of the Arts London. This is good because they're all maintained. In other words, they're government funded and are just like every other course at university with the standard yearly fees (£3000+). The private schools such as RADA and LAMDA are also linked with larger universities and charge similar fees. As a matter of fact, out of the 22 accredited schools, the majority are maintained by the government like any other course. There are only a few that are not, so don't worry. It's about £35-45 for an audition to each of these schools. Accommodation is usually offered by the schools, especially those that are associated with larger universities. If not, they will provide a system to help search for private housing.
Hi, i have read your replies on lots of threads and they are SO useful. Which schools are the top ones? Also in my first year of applying do you recommend going for it or taking a year out to train. I am part of nyt and have some previous experience but not loads. Lots of my talent is natural.
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