Acuityo
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#1
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Mechanical Eng vs Electrical Eng vs Software Eng (Computer Science)
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History98
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EE for the win
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0le
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They are all pretty different degrees. Pick the one which you find most interesting.
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University of Bradford
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(Original post by Acuityo)
Mechanical Eng vs Electrical Eng vs Software Eng (Computer Science)
Hey @Acuityo

Have you had any further thoughts about which engineering course you want to study? I'd recommend having a look at university course listings and find the module information for each one, see which you think sounds more interesting and the career opportunities available upon graduation. I'd also recommend booking onto some open days and attending course talks for each, you'll also have the opportunity to speak to the course tutors and students so you can get a deeper insight into the course and ask any burning questions you may have.

Good luck with it!

Becky
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artful_lounger
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Well, software engineering isn't "engineering" in the same way as the other two so that's an entirely different field to start with. EE and mechanical engineering are pretty different degrees with different kinds of roles you'd go into and not everyone would be that good at both.
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Acuityo
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Well, software engineering isn't "engineering" in the same way as the other two so that's an entirely different field to start with. EE and mechanical engineering are pretty different degrees with different kinds of roles you'd go into and not everyone would be that good at both.
Engineering - the branch of science and technology concerned with the design, building, and use of engines, machines, and structures.

Software Engineering is in fact an Engineering and Computer Science is an Engineering Degree. You learn programming in EE and Mech E I have an interest in Tech Devices so Mech E wouldn't really fit so its between Computer Engineering/Computer Science or EE
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0le
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(Original post by Acuityo)
Engineering - the branch of science and technology concerned with the design, building, and use of engines, machines, and structures.

Software Engineering is in fact an Engineering and Computer Science is an Engineering Degree. You learn programming in EE and Mech E I have an interest in Tech Devices so Mech E wouldn't really fit so its between Computer Engineering/Computer Science or EE
Calling software development a form of engineering is really a subset of a wider debate about engineering in the UK not being a protected title. This causes problems because the word "engineering" can therefore mean different things to different people.

Not all computer science courses are engineering degrees. For example, Bristol offers a BSc computer science course as an alternative to a BEng. Similarly other universities such as Oxford also offer non-engineering computer science degrees too:
http://www.bristol.ac.uk/study/under.../bsc-comp-sci/
https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/unde...mputer-science

As far as I understand it, Computer Science is concerned more with the development and optimization of software to run on hardware. However electrical engineering is concerned more with the design of the hardware itself. Obviously there is some overlap the extent of which depends on both the university you attend and the degree you select.

Your use of the phrase "tech devices" is a little vague and could mean a wide range of things. A lot of devices will use, for example, gears, cooling systems or hydraulics which would probably be better understood by a mechanical engineer. An engine would be considered a technical device. Alternatively electrical engineering will probably be better suited for devices with a strong design emphasis on electronics or electrical infrastructure.

Engineers are generally expected to have a wide range of knowledge and/or be able to learn as they go along. In my opinion it is this aspect which makes engineering degrees quite challenging.
Last edited by 0le; 4 months ago
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