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Best subject along with maths and economics

Hey,
Whats the best subject in A levels along with these which is a bit easy to get high grade (A*)in but still is not a completely useless subject which will be seen as unnecessary by unis.
I’m thinking about taking geography, what else do you guys suggest?
Thanks
Reply 1
Original post by TriplexA
Business if that's your cup of tea :smile:

I wouldn’t mind that but many people have told me not to take business studies with economics, many websites also have this.
No subject will be easy. Do not take business with Economics as universities sometimes consider them too similar and count them as 1 subject. Otherwise take anything you will enjoy and do well in. Universities generally require 2 subjects from a preferred list and both of yours will be included on that list. The 3rd can be anything except things like General studies so things like Politics, Sociology or Law can be used in addition to traditional subjects.
What are you aiming to do after school? Uni? Work? Something else? If uni, what subject are you hoping to study?

I would note that for e.g. economics at certain unis such as LSE, Cambridge, Warwick, and similar, A-level Further Maths is normally expected if your school offers it (most years more than 95% of successful applicants to LSE single honours economics have AS or A-level FM). So if that is your goal, you should aim to take FM if it is offered (and if it's not, you should see if you can take it via the Advanced Mathematics Support Programme - AMSP).
Reply 4
Original post by artful_lounger
What are you aiming to do after school? Uni? Work? Something else? If uni, what subject are you hoping to study?

I would note that for e.g. economics at certain unis such as LSE, Cambridge, Warwick, and similar, A-level Further Maths is normally expected if your school offers it (most years more than 95% of successful applicants to LSE single honours economics have AS or A-level FM). So if that is your goal, you should aim to take FM if it is offered (and if it's not, you should see if you can take it via the Advanced Mathematics Support Programme - AMSP).

I’m planning for finance/economics in top unis but I’m not really good in maths so a bit skeptical about further mathematics, most of those courses require A*AA so if i get AA in maths and economics i need another easy enough subject to get an A*.
Original post by Lucifer14
I’m planning for finance/economics in top unis but I’m not really good in maths so a bit skeptical about further mathematics, most of those courses require A*AA so if i get AA in maths and economics i need another easy enough subject to get an A*.

As already stated a few top universities require or prefer FM. If you plan applying there take FM. If not take what you like. Maths is the key subject and universities usually an A or A* in it.
Original post by Lucifer14
I’m planning for finance/economics in top unis but I’m not really good in maths so a bit skeptical about further mathematics, most of those courses require A*AA so if i get AA in maths and economics i need another easy enough subject to get an A*.


If you are aiming for economics at those unis FM is a functional requirement for LSE and would make you considerably less competitive at similar ones like Cambridge and Warwick. Also a number of those unis will actually specify the A* be in maths or further maths in the first place (this is the standard offer at LSE, and entirely possible at Cambridge etc). You can't really aim for the "minimum to scrape through" if you are targeting those unis - they receive so many applicants who greatly exceed their entry criteria they can absolutely pick and choose among those who e.g. have FM vs those who don't, those who got the A* in maths vs who only got an A, etc.

I would suggest you reassess your plan and approach, or manage your expectations in which unis you want to target.
Reply 7
Original post by artful_lounger
If you are aiming for economics at those unis FM is a functional requirement for LSE and would make you considerably less competitive at similar ones like Cambridge and Warwick. Also a number of those unis will actually specify the A* be in maths or further maths in the first place (this is the standard offer at LSE, and entirely possible at Cambridge etc). You can't really aim for the "minimum to scrape through" if you are targeting those unis - they receive so many applicants who greatly exceed their entry criteria they can absolutely pick and choose among those who e.g. have FM vs those who don't, those who got the A* in maths vs who only got an A, etc.

I would suggest you reassess your plan and approach, or manage your expectations in which unis you want to target.

Yeah most of them have maths at A requirement and further mathematics preference but as i said further mathematics will he tough for me, who knows if i get a B/C in that, which will not be good. I scored a B in IGCSE maths.
Original post by Lucifer14
Yeah most of them have maths at A requirement and further mathematics preference but as i said further mathematics will he tough for me, who knows if i get a B/C in that, which will not be good. I scored a B in IGCSE maths.


You need to then consider if you would struggle in A-level Further Maths, and struggle to get more than an A in A-level Maths, if economics, especially at those universities which are widely known to have extremely mathematical courses, is the right option for you. I suspect the answer is...probably not. Degree level economics is necessarily mathematical throughout and even if you don't take A-level FM in school, you will study at least a reasonable chunk of those topics in an economics degree, except you will be studying them in a lecture theatre of 200 students and covering in 2 lectures what you might've spent two weeks of lessons on in school (with little to no individual attention if you have issues with the material).

Finance courses are somewhat more variable in terms of the mathematical content they have, and for more management/accounting aligned ones this can be somewhat less. But for financial mathematics courses and similar, or finance at LSE in all likelihood, it will again be an extremely mathematical degree. So you need to be very careful in looking at the courses and see what would be a good fit for you, and at which unis.

You should choose your degree course based on what you are good at, not try and scrape through to force yourself as a square peg into a round hole of that degree for whatever end goal you have in mind. Because more than likely you would just then end up hating your degree and quite possibly getting a 2:2 or 3rd, which would close off many doors anyway. You are really approaching this back to front - start with what you are good at, then decide what to pursue based on that. If maths is not what you are good at don't try and force yourself into a highly mathematical degree.

Note if your goal is to work in investment banking or something, your degree subject isn't really that important and you could just as well do a degree in anything provided you went to a target uni and got relevant work experience (the latter being extremely important).
Reply 9
Original post by artful_lounger
You need to then consider if you would struggle in A-level Further Maths, and struggle to get more than an A in A-level Maths, if economics, especially at those universities which are widely known to have extremely mathematical courses, is the right option for you. I suspect the answer is...probably not. Degree level economics is necessarily mathematical throughout and even if you don't take A-level FM in school, you will study at least a reasonable chunk of those topics in an economics degree, except you will be studying them in a lecture theatre of 200 students and covering in 2 lectures what you might've spent two weeks of lessons on in school (with little to no individual attention if you have issues with the material).

Finance courses are somewhat more variable in terms of the mathematical content they have, and for more management/accounting aligned ones this can be somewhat less. But for financial mathematics courses and similar, or finance at LSE in all likelihood, it will again be an extremely mathematical degree. So you need to be very careful in looking at the courses and see what would be a good fit for you, and at which unis.

You should choose your degree course based on what you are good at, not try and scrape through to force yourself as a square peg into a round hole of that degree for whatever end goal you have in mind. Because more than likely you would just then end up hating your degree and quite possibly getting a 2:2 or 3rd, which would close off many doors anyway. You are really approaching this back to front - start with what you are good at, then decide what to pursue based on that. If maths is not what you are good at don't try and force yourself into a highly mathematical degree.

Note if your goal is to work in investment banking or something, your degree subject isn't really that important and you could just as well do a degree in anything provided you went to a target uni and got relevant work experience (the latter being extremely important).

Yes you’re right i am aiming for investment banking/trading but in the recent years, most of them are preferring degrees with mathematical bases, keepIng that aside what other courses do you recommend considering i do like economics,business etc.
Original post by Lucifer14
Yes you’re right i am aiming for investment banking/trading but in the recent years, most of them are preferring degrees with mathematical bases, keepIng that aside what other courses do you recommend considering i do like economics,business etc.


Just do anything at a target uni and get relevant work experience during the degree. Provided you're at a target uni, the main important thing will be work experience. You could just as well do law, economic history, land economy, sociology, history, anthropology etc, if you put the effort into making yourself employable by getting relevant work experience and making sure you understand the industry and key skills needed in it that you will be expected to evidence in an interview. They really don't "prefer" mathematical degrees, except quant finance (which normally expects a fully numerate degree in e.g. maths, engineering, CS, etc, and a PhD in some computational project). More students from that background are applying to those jobs, but that's just because in general most students are choosing those more mathematical courses in the first place.
Reply 11
Original post by artful_lounger
Just do anything at a target uni and get relevant work experience during the degree. Provided you're at a target uni, the main important thing will be work experience. You could just as well do law, economic history, land economy, sociology, history, anthropology etc, if you put the effort into making yourself employable by getting relevant work experience and making sure you understand the industry and key skills needed in it that you will be expected to evidence in an interview. They really don't "prefer" mathematical degrees, except quant finance (which normally expects a fully numerate degree in e.g. maths, engineering, CS, etc, and a PhD in some computational project). More students from that background are applying to those jobs, but that's just because in general most students are choosing those more mathematical courses in the first place.

Alright, thanks for the advice, yeah I’m already starting to learn some skills like coding and learning some languages like spanish etc which can help.
Thanks
Reply 12
If you don’t mind essays, politics could be good. I take politics with maths and economics, and it isn’t too bad. However, it is a lot of content.
How to Choose 6th Form subjects - read it all - https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/a-level/subjects/choosing-your-subjects

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