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Hello can someone mark my 6 marker on social influence?

Please, be honest and what you didn't like or like. thank you.

Question: Identify two factors that have been shown to affect obedience to authority. Briefly discuss how each of their factors affects obedience to authority.

Answer: One factor would be the legitimacy of authority these factors create high levels of obedience
. For example, Milgram's Study showed how social hierarchies within society might affect likeliness to obey. We accept these authority figures to have the right to gain social powers over others. this means it would allow society to function adequately.

Another factor would be the agentic state we may obey individuals in a higher social status as we believe we lose a sense of reposnsiblilty as the authority would be in control of our behaviour. This may justify that we are doing what we are being told.
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by kkavinaa
Please, be honest and what you didn't like or like. thank you.

Question: Identify two factors that have been shown to affect obedience to authority. Briefly discuss how each of their factors affects obedience to authority.

Answer: One factor would be the legitimacy of authority these factors create high levels of obedience
. For example, Milgram's Study showed how social hierarchies within society might affect likeliness to obey. We accept these authority figures to have the right to gain social powers over others. this means it would allow society to function adequately.

Another factor would be the agentic state we may obey individuals in a higher social status as we believe we lose a sense of reposnsiblilty as the authority would be in control of our behaviour. This may justify that we are doing what we are being told.

Milgram is fine - it is the classical study for obedience. Would it help to mention the cultural conditioning re "authority" that was prevalent at the time. It wouldn't be allowed these days for ethical reasons for example.

Responsibility is a good approach but perhaps you might want to expand your ideas. This could apply to simple and unimportant situations e.g. when an individual comes home after a long day and finds that someone else in the family has taken on the responsibility to start the evening meal. Again there may be a very serious decision to be taken whether to stop intubating a new born baby in A&E who was born prematurely, blind and deaf and may have brain damage. Parents have to decide. Do they share this responsibility equally or does one 'follow' the other - for whatever reason?

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