The Student Room Group

are glycoprotein and receptors the same thing?

as title please
A glycoprotein can be a receptor but not exclusively. For example, murein is a glycoprotein that makes up the cell wall of prokaryotes (so in this case it is not a receptor). Hope this makes sense :smile:
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by BelleBinoclarde
A glycoprotein can be a receptor but not exclusively. For example, murein is a glycoprotein that makes up the cell wall of prokaryotes (so in this case it is not a receptor). Hope this makes sense :smile:

thanks :smile:
yes, it makes sense now
Original post by BelleBinoclarde
A glycoprotein can be a receptor but not exclusively. For example, murein is a glycoprotein that makes up the cell wall of prokaryotes (so in this case it is not a receptor). Hope this makes sense :smile:

also is it true that antigen is just a type of receptor?
No, an antigen is a protein on the surface of any cell that triggers an immune response. The immune response is triggered when a complementary receptor of a T helper cell attaches to the antigen. (So basically they are not the same thing). Hopefully that makes sense too now :smile:
Hello @BrightBlueStar11,

I think the easy way to look at this Q, and indeed numerous others in A level biology and beyond, is to look at technical terms, work out or look up the meaning in ordinary English, or in its Greek/Latin root; then you will be laughing away! :laugh:

In these examples, glycoprotein refers to a CHEMICAL COMPOUND i.e. a protein that has been glycosylated [carbohydrate moiety added to it], so CRUCIALLY it is a CHEMICAL SUBSTANCE [MOLECULE].

On the other hand, a receptor or an antigen is a biological structure, albeit infinitesimally minute, so although it could be a chemical moiety [as in a single ATP synthase molecule [a chemical item] ACTUALLY BEING a single stalked particle [biological [ultramicroscopic] structure], it is likely to BE not identical.

Keep twinkling young lady/man! :star:

M

Quick Reply

Latest