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can you join afc harrogate for the royal marines

I am looking at attending afc harrogate, but am still not sure what role in the armed forces I want. I have been thinking towards joinging the rifles, but now I am starting to look into the marines (both of which you can join at 16) but I cannot find any information online on where you go when you join the navy (or the marines) at 16. There doesn't seem to be that much information online so it would mean a lot if anyone knows the answe.
Reply 1
Harrogate is the Army Foundation College.

For the Royal Navy/Royal Marines:

https://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/careers
Original post by spencer.baker
I am looking at attending afc harrogate, but am still not sure what role in the armed forces I want. I have been thinking towards joinging the rifles, but now I am starting to look into the marines (both of which you can join at 16) but I cannot find any information online on where you go when you join the navy (or the marines) at 16. There doesn't seem to be that much information online so it would mean a lot if anyone knows the answe.

Hi unfortunately, the Royal Navy and Royal Marines do not have 'Junior' entrant college as the Army does at Harrogate. You would enter Basic Training at HMS RALEIGH (Torpoint nr Plymouth) or Commando Training Centre RM (CTCRM) Exmouth and the only distinction I am aware of is the fact you can't be Operationally deployed (Combat) until attaining age 18 (but I stand to be corrected on this). So you would be undertaking your training with all ages of recruits....but these orgnisations are geared up to support all needs and types...so don't let that put you off. My son wanted to join RM at 16.5 and I thought it too young and asked him to watch the online footage of the TV series of AFC Harrogate....he did so and is now thoroughly enjoying himself at AFC Harrogate as a JS. I feel a little guilty as an ex-Chief Petty Officer in the RN as my bias would be towards the Royal Marines...but a least he is with similar aged Peers and has 12 months to decide (can opt out sooner) if the British Army is for him. Although I have told him the Adult Army will be different to what he is experiencing at Harrogate....but AFC Harrogate have been doing this for some time and seem very good and adept at preparing the Junior Soldiers for Phase II training. Whatever you choose good luck ..you are doing the right thing seeking lots of advice ....I found a Career in the Armed Forces very rewarding and I hope my son (and daughter now in RN) do too.
Original post by Swampster929
Hi unfortunately, the Royal Navy and Royal Marines do not have 'Junior' entrant college as the Army does at Harrogate. You would enter Basic Training at HMS RALEIGH (Torpoint nr Plymouth) or Commando Training Centre RM (CTCRM) Exmouth and the only distinction I am aware of is the fact you can't be Operationally deployed (Combat) until attaining age 18 (but I stand to be corrected on this). So you would be undertaking your training with all ages of recruits....but these orgnisations are geared up to support all needs and types...so don't let that put you off. My son wanted to join RM at 16.5 and I thought it too young and asked him to watch the online footage of the TV series of AFC Harrogate....he did so and is now thoroughly enjoying himself at AFC Harrogate as a JS. I feel a little guilty as an ex-Chief Petty Officer in the RN as my bias would be towards the Royal Marines...but a least he is with similar aged Peers and has 12 months to decide (can opt out sooner) if the British Army is for him. Although I have told him the Adult Army will be different to what he is experiencing at Harrogate....but AFC Harrogate have been doing this for some time and seem very good and adept at preparing the Junior Soldiers for Phase II training. Whatever you choose good luck ..you are doing the right thing seeking lots of advice ....I found a Career in the Armed Forces very rewarding and I hope my son (and daughter now in RN) do too.

Hi

Do you know if i join AFC Harrogate can i leave after the 20 week course if i decide its not for me?
Original post by mentocornroast
Hi

Do you know if i join AFC Harrogate can i leave after the 20 week course if i decide its not for me?

Hi you will have an employment contract with the British Army on joining AFC as a Junior Soldier …check AFC website and it will tell you at what pint you can leave …however anyone joining any of the Armed Forces under 18 as a legal right to give 30 days notice to leave before turning 18 …some lads in my son’s entry did leave early into the course as it wasn’t for them (he is on 49 week course) - give it a try £1000 income per month salary …food accomm and clothing and option to leave if not for you - good luck
Original post by Swampster929
Hi you will have an employment contract with the British Army on joining AFC as a Junior Soldier …check AFC website and it will tell you at what pint you can leave …however anyone joining any of the Armed Forces under 18 as a legal right to give 30 days notice to leave before turning 18 …some lads in my son’s entry did leave early into the course as it wasn’t for them (he is on 49 week course) - give it a try £1000 income per month salary …food accomm and clothing and option to leave if not for you - good luck

Thank you for your reply. I want to go Im just scared they won’t let me leave. I heard of a boy who’s notice to leave harrogate got ripped up in front of him
Hi not sure how they could have ripped it up as a long as it was done within the correct time frame it is your legal right - perhaps it was a gesture to have the Junior Solider reconsider his request to be discharged? Below is an extract from 'The Queen's Regulations for Army' ........para b states you can submit your notice, if you join under 18, by giving 14 days notice to the Commanding Officer (AFC Harrogate in your case)...after 28 days service but before six months service has completed (which starts on first day of paid service after Attestation (swearing Oath to the HM The Queen).....it seems if you go past six months service....you can't use this option......but I guess most people will have decided by six months if the Army is right for them? Good luck if you decide to go.....try and get on an 'Open Day' at AFC to see what it is like.Termination of Recruits as a Statutory Right9.291. All recruits enlisting into the Regular Army for the first time have the right to claim their termination according to the terms of their engagement. This is called Discharge as of Right (DAOR).9.292. A recruit shall have the right to determine their service by giving not less than 14 days’ notice in writing to their CO subject to the following conditions:a. Right of those under 18 years to determine service: A person who enlists in the regular army will have the right to determine service if before their 18th birthday, they give notice in writing to their CO of their desire to determine their service;b. If aged under 18 years at attestation. At any time after the end of 28 days and before the end of six months reckoned from the date on which the soldier first reported for full time paid duty following attestation. The soldier does not have to pay anything to exercise this right, but 14 days’ notice is required which MUST be given within the six months period. The period of notice may be reduced at the discretion of the CO.

Update....just found this on the internet but would definately check with Army Careers office if you apply for AFC....it is a document issued by a Charity/Non-Government Organisation (Child Soldiers International) which says you can still apply for Discharge as A Right after six months service as long as you do it before your 18th Birthday (and I also think I saw this in the contract the Army sent for my son to join AFC)....I have pasted it below....my advice if you are not sure is to speak with the Army Careers advisers ...try and get to AFC on an Open Day ...and if you do decide to join...it seems you have lots of options to leave if you are unhappy provided you do it before you turn 18 (and after 28 days service and 14 days notice)...so you will do a minimum of 6 weeks. I am sure my son told me some lads had actually left before this 6 week period but I don't know how they did that).....I read somewhere (in 2013) it cost approx £69,000.00 to train a Junior Soldier....which is why they would try and persuade you to stay :smile: ...this is the extract from the Charity paper...
‘The Committee recommends that the State party review the requirements for, and expand the exercise of, the
“discharge as of right” for child recruits.’100
69. This recommendation has been implemented. Child recruits now have a legal right, albeit a qualified one,
to leave the armed forces provided that notice is given before turning 18.
70. Following an advocacy campaign by British human rights groups, in July 2011 the government extended
enlisted children a legal right of discharge (called DU18) up to their 18th birthday.101
Once children have
served for six months from the date of enlistment, they lose their legal right to discharge at 14 days’
notice. As of 2011, however, they benefit from the legal right to leave the regular armed forces at up to
three months’ notice, provided that written application to leave is made before their 18th birthday.102

Recruits are now informed of this right in their enlistment papers.103
71. The DU18 provision does not allow a recruit to leave the armed forces at will in a manner comparable to
civilian employment. The child has no legal right to leave during their first six weeks (28 days + 14 days’
notice period = 42 days). Thereafter, the child’s application to discharge must first be reviewed and
enacted by their Commanding Officer, pending a process during which the chain of command may seek
to persuade the child to stay. Furthermore, enlisted children are subject to military law and may still be
prosecuted for Absence Without Leave and other military offences, in which case the right of discharge is
suspended until any sentence imposed is fully served. Once a recruit turns 18 (if six months have passed
from the date they enlisted), they are automatically locked into their employment with the armed forces
for four years (in the army) or less (in the navy and air force).
72. These qualifications notwithstanding, the new provision has helped to protect the rights of many children
who joined the forces only to find that it was not what they expected it to be. In the past five years, no
child recruits have been sentenced at a court martial for trying to leave the armed forces unlawfully.10
(edited 1 year ago)

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