Parents don't want me to do an apprenticeship

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vincentvangooo
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#1
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#1
I applied for, and got offers for, economics at 'highly ranked' unis, and at the time I thought that is what I wanted to do. Because I was also kind of interested in business management (but never really intended taking it as a degree as I was told it wasn't that respected), I also applied for some project management/chartered management degree apprenticeships, and I managed to secure an offer with Arup - from the job description, the work seems like something I would love to do, the salary and location are decent, and the fact my degree is paid for is a bonus.

I would love the experience, and the more I think about it, I would prefer to study management over economics anyway. However, when I spoke to my parents (I never told them I was applying to degree apprenticeships in the first place, only when I got the offer), they said that apprenticeships were for non academic people, people that can't get into uni etc which obviously isn't true. I was wondering if anyone had any advice for what to say to my parents about this, or what you did if you were in this situation?

Thanks, and sorry for the long post lol.
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Annu_4
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#2
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#2
I guess you can explain that you are still going to uni and getting a degree. Also, it’s can be more difficult than uni because you have to study and work at the same time, so you’re gaining experience that you can’t when going straight to uni.
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Briefprofile
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#3
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(Original post by vincentvangooo)
I applied for, and got offers for, economics at 'highly ranked' unis, and at the time I thought that is what I wanted to do. Because I was also kind of interested in business management (but never really intended taking it as a degree as I was told it wasn't that respected), I also applied for some project management/chartered management degree apprenticeships, and I managed to secure an offer with Arup - from the job description, the work seems like something I would love to do, the salary and location are decent, and the fact my degree is paid for is a bonus.

I would love the experience, and the more I think about it, I would prefer to study management over economics anyway. However, when I spoke to my parents (I never told them I was applying to degree apprenticeships in the first place, only when I got the offer), they said that apprenticeships were for non academic people, people that can't get into uni etc which obviously isn't true. I was wondering if anyone had any advice for what to say to my parents about this, or what you did if you were in this situation?

Thanks, and sorry for the long post lol.
Being that I'm in uni at the moment, I would advise you go for a degree apprenticeship. A degree on its own (whether 'respected' or not) is useless in this new era.

Parents are sometimes not up to date with these things. They haven't realised that there is a saturation of graduates roaming unemployed etc. They could be aware, but they don't get it properly. The staunch academic years are long gone.

Sit them down, and explain to them that you are doing a degree and are working at the same time! Use punch words and be patient until you make them see it the way you do. And tell them that no loan on your back either! This should make them reconsider.
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Muttley79
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#4
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#4
(Original post by vincentvangooo)
I applied for, and got offers for, economics at 'highly ranked' unis, and at the time I thought that is what I wanted to do. Because I was also kind of interested in business management (but never really intended taking it as a degree as I was told it wasn't that respected), I also applied for some project management/chartered management degree apprenticeships, and I managed to secure an offer with Arup - from the job description, the work seems like something I would love to do, the salary and location are decent, and the fact my degree is paid for is a bonus.

I would love the experience, and the more I think about it, I would prefer to study management over economics anyway. However, when I spoke to my parents (I never told them I was applying to degree apprenticeships in the first place, only when I got the offer), they said that apprenticeships were for non academic people, people that can't get into uni etc which obviously isn't true. I was wondering if anyone had any advice for what to say to my parents about this, or what you did if you were in this situation?

Thanks, and sorry for the long post lol.
Who is the one studying, you or your parents? Can your school explain the benefits of getting a degree AND a salary?
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vincentvangooo
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#5
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(Original post by Annu_4)
I guess you can explain that you are still going to uni and getting a degree. Also, it’s can be more difficult than uni because you have to study and work at the same time, so you’re gaining experience that you can’t when going straight to uni.
(Original post by Briefprofile)
Being that I'm in uni at the moment, I would advise you go for a degree apprenticeship. A degree on its own (whether 'respected' or not) is useless in this new era.

Parents are sometimes not up to date with these things. They haven't realised that there is a saturation of graduates roaming unemployed etc. They could be aware, but they don't get it properly. The staunch academic years are long gone.

Sit them down, and explain to them that you are doing a degree and are working at the same time! Use punch words and be patient until you make them see it the way you do. And tell them that no loan on your back either! This should make them reconsider.
(Original post by Muttley79)
Who is the one studying, you or your parents? Can your school explain the benefits of getting a degree AND a salary?
Thanks guys, I'm definitely going to try to explain how competitive it is to get jobs/grad schemes after uni, and how i'll have no debt and basically all the positives in the long term. It's just difficult because I know they're not really the type to understand other people's perspectives and they're quite set in their ways in terms of what they think is best for my career in the future (even though it's literally MY career not theirs). They're also the type to say things like 'why are you trying to argue with me' or 'stop shouting' or whatever when I'm literally trying to calmly explain my point, it's just a bit frustrating really, but I'm determined to try nonetheless. Thanks again for the advice guys
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Thisismyunitsr
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#6
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#6
(Original post by Briefprofile)
Being that I'm in uni at the moment, I would advise you go for a degree apprenticeship. A degree on its own (whether 'respected' or not) is useless in this new era.

Parents are sometimes not up to date with these things. They haven't realised that there is a saturation of graduates roaming unemployed etc. They could be aware, but they don't get it properly. The staunch academic years are long gone.

Sit them down, and explain to them that you are doing a degree and are working at the same time! Use punch words and be patient until you make them see it the way you do. And tell them that no loan on your back either! This should make them reconsider.
Great advice.
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Laburnum1
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#7
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#7
(Original post by Annu_4)
I guess you can explain that you are still going to uni and getting a degree. Also, it’s can be more difficult than uni because you have to study and work at the same time, so you’re gaining experience that you can’t when going straight to uni.
Congratulations on getting a apprenticeship I would love my son to get one he is predicted 3 xAstar a levels but Isn’t having any luck explain how competitive it is to your parents and hopefully they will be really proud of you .
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campergirl123
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#8
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#8
(Original post by vincentvangooo)
I applied for, and got offers for, economics at 'highly ranked' unis, and at the time I thought that is what I wanted to do. Because I was also kind of interested in business management (but never really intended taking it as a degree as I was told it wasn't that respected), I also applied for some project management/chartered management degree apprenticeships, and I managed to secure an offer with Arup - from the job description, the work seems like something I would love to do, the salary and location are decent, and the fact my degree is paid for is a bonus.

I would love the experience, and the more I think about it, I would prefer to study management over economics anyway. However, when I spoke to my parents (I never told them I was applying to degree apprenticeships in the first place, only when I got the offer), they said that apprenticeships were for non academic people, people that can't get into uni etc which obviously isn't true. I was wondering if anyone had any advice for what to say to my parents about this, or what you did if you were in this situation?

Thanks, and sorry for the long post lol.
My son is very academic, predicted A*AA in maths, further maths and DT product design. He has a civil engineering DA offer. It’s a no brainer to come out with a paid for degree, 5 years work experience, charteredship and an annual salary. If anything a DA is much harder work and takes a lot of time management skills, especially if you have compete at a high level in a sport like my son.
I think your parents need to do some research to realise that it’s a fairly competitive market.
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Blue_Cow
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#9
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#9
(Original post by vincentvangooo)
I applied for, and got offers for, economics at 'highly ranked' unis, and at the time I thought that is what I wanted to do. Because I was also kind of interested in business management (but never really intended taking it as a degree as I was told it wasn't that respected), I also applied for some project management/chartered management degree apprenticeships, and I managed to secure an offer with Arup - from the job description, the work seems like something I would love to do, the salary and location are decent, and the fact my degree is paid for is a bonus.

I would love the experience, and the more I think about it, I would prefer to study management over economics anyway. However, when I spoke to my parents (I never told them I was applying to degree apprenticeships in the first place, only when I got the offer), they said that apprenticeships were for non academic people, people that can't get into uni etc which obviously isn't true. I was wondering if anyone had any advice for what to say to my parents about this, or what you did if you were in this situation?

Thanks, and sorry for the long post lol.
Arup is a great company. Many graduates could only dream of getting a job offer there on their grad schemes after 3-years of university, let alone securing a degree apprenticeship there at the age of 18... well done!

People think that you can waltz into a job with a degree from a "prestigious" university, especially the parents who have an old fashioned view of university degrees and the labour market. I'm not sure what your parents concerns are because you literally are going to university, but working at the same time...
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aaq1
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#10
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#10
actually, I have also seen the problem the other way round. Some parents want their children to go for DA but children are influenced by peers and even teachers that they are keen on uni. Especially there is a lot made about missing the uni life experience etc. So in one way OP has a nice problem. I hope eventually his parents see the merit of doing DA.
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