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Losing weight

So basically I understand that you need to eat less calories than you burn to lose weight, but would this also decrease your muscles with it?
Original post by Bigflakes
So basically I understand that you need to eat less calories than you burn to lose weight, but would this also decrease your muscles with it?


Technically yes - it's practically impossible to lose just fat mass. There is always some loss of LBM (lean body mass) when you try to lose weight, and this is unavoidable. Depending on the amount of weight you need to lose, and the magnitude of the energy restriction, about 70% of the total weight lost is 'fat' - the other 30% is LBM.

If you want to minimise loss of muscle, then don't go for a huge energy restriction, keep a good protein intake and be active, but not trying to lift heavy weights or do significant amounts of weight training - all that will do is hasten your loss of LBM. Save the weight training for when you're not in an energy deficit.
Reply 2
I’m currently going through a calorie deficit. You should be doing weight training (in a caloric deficit) to increase muscle mass, while losing weight. I was advised not to do too much cardio. Like you can still do cardio as it helps a lot with fat burning. But if you keep just doing cardio and no weight training, then your muscle mass will decrease. Just keep a balance and you’ll be fine.
Reply 3
Original post by Reality Check
Technically yes - it's practically impossible to lose just fat mass. There is always some loss of LBM (lean body mass) when you try to lose weight, and this is unavoidable. Depending on the amount of weight you need to lose, and the magnitude of the energy restriction, about 70% of the total weight lost is 'fat' - the other 30% is LBM.

If you want to minimise loss of muscle, then don't go for a huge energy restriction, keep a good protein intake and be active, but not trying to lift heavy weights or do significant amounts of weight training - all that will do is hasten your loss of LBM. Save the weight training for when you're not in an energy deficit.


Thanks, when being energy deficient/ hungry would it be good to wait a little longer before eating or could this harm you in any way?
Reply 4
Original post by 2022 g
I’m currently going through a calorie deficit. You should be doing weight training (in a caloric deficit) to increase muscle mass, while losing weight. I was advised not to do too much cardio. Like you can still do cardio as it helps a lot with fat burning. But if you keep just doing cardio and no weight training, then your muscle mass will decrease. Just keep a balance and you’ll be fine.


Thanks
Original post by 2022 g
You should be doing weight training (in a caloric deficit) to increase muscle mass, while losing weight.

This is a contradiction in terms and energetically impossible. You cannot increase muscle mass, an anabolic process, when you are in a state of energy deficit, or catabolism.

Original post by Bigflakes
Thanks, when being energy deficient/ hungry would it be good to wait a little longer before eating or could this harm you in any way?

Learning to recognize hunger, and to be able to deal with hunger, is an important life skill, basically :smile: It will do you absolutely no harm to not immediately eat when hungry and, frankly, if you're wanting to lose a little weight, then a degree of hunger is unavoidable, despite the promises of endless diets promising magical results with literally no hunger. We're not talking getting to a stage where you are ravenous, but a feeling of 'wanting to eat something but resisting' isn't a bad thing.
Reply 6
Original post by Reality Check
Learning to recognize hunger, and to be able to deal with hunger, is an important life skill, basically :smile: It will do you absolutely no harm to not immediately eat when hungry and, frankly, if you're wanting to lose a little weight, then a degree of hunger is unavoidable, despite the promises of endless diets promising magical results with literally no hunger. We're not talking getting to a stage where you are ravenous, but a feeling of 'wanting to eat something but resisting' isn't a bad thing.


Thank you
Original post by Bigflakes
Thank you

No worries :smile:
Reply 8
Original post by Reality Check
This is a contradiction in terms and energetically impossible. You cannot increase muscle mass, an anabolic process, when you are in a state of energy deficit, or catabolism.

Basically I’m not going through something like ketone, where i have like 5% carbs or what not. I’m having like around 40%-50% carbs. I’m going through a long weight loss process, to help maintain muscle mass. So i am able to lift heavy weights and increase strength as well as endurance, while losing weight.
Since I’m 19 years old its very easy for me to lose weight while increase muscle mass as well. So far I’ve lost nearly 5kg within 16 days. But obviously as you get older it will be increasingly more difficult to lose weight. But yeh for me I’m able to lift heavy as well as going through a deficit. It will be different for everyone. :smile:
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by 2022 g
Basically I’m not going through something like ketone, where i have like 5% carbs or what not. I’m having like around 40%-50% carbs. I’m going through a long weight loss process, to help maintain muscle mass. So i am able to lift heavy weights and increase strength as well as endurance, while losing weight.
Since I’m 19 years old its very easy for me to lose weight while increase muscle mass as well. So far I’ve lost nearly 5kg within 16 days. But obviously as you get older it will be increasingly more difficult to lose weight. But yeh for me I’m able to lift heavy as well as going through a deficit. It will be different for everyone. :smile:

I appreciate your comments, but for me there isn't enough evidence for this 'body recompositioning' idea of simultaneously gaining muscle mass and losing fat mass. You're right to mention your age as being a positive factor, but you do know that it's impossible to lose 5kg of body fat in 16 days, don't you? 5kg is equivalent to 35,500kCal, or a deficit (however created) of 2400kCal a day... Much of that 5kg is going to be water.

Good luck with your fitness goals :smile:
Original post by Reality Check
I appreciate your comments, but for me there isn't enough evidence for this 'body recompositioning' idea of simultaneously gaining muscle mass and losing fat mass. You're right to mention your age as being a positive factor, but you do know that it's impossible to lose 5kg of body fat in 16 days, don't you? 5kg is equivalent to 35,500kCal, or a deficit (however created) of 2400kCal a day... Much of that 5kg is going to be water.

Good luck with your fitness goals :smile:

When i found out it took me 16 days to lose nearly 5kg i was in shock lol. As you’re right, it is “impossible to lose 5kg of body fat in 16 days”. It makes a lot of sense that most of it is probably water weight. Thanks for telling me :smile:
I’m hoping to reach 70kg weight. As i am around 80kg currently. So it will hopefully take within a couple of months (hopefully before September) for me to reach my goal.

Thank you!!
Original post by 2022 g
When i found out it took me 16 days to lose nearly 5kg i was in shock lol. As you’re right, it is “impossible to lose 5kg of body fat in 16 days”. It makes a lot of sense that most of it is probably water weight. Thanks for telling me :smile:
I’m hoping to reach 70kg weight. As i am around 80kg currently. So it will hopefully take within a couple of months (hopefully before September) for me to reach my goal.

Thank you!!

I'm sure you'll make that goal no problem. Best of luck with it :smile:
Reply 12
Original post by Reality Check
I appreciate your comments, but for me there isn't enough evidence for this 'body recompositioning' idea of simultaneously gaining muscle mass and losing fat mass. You're right to mention your age as being a positive factor, but you do know that it's impossible to lose 5kg of body fat in 16 days, don't you? 5kg is equivalent to 35,500kCal, or a deficit (however created) of 2400kCal a day... Much of that 5kg is going to be water.

Good luck with your fitness goals :smile:

I thought it was generally accepted that absolute beginners can lose fat and gain muscle at the same time. Beginners' muscles or so sensitive to protein synthesis that the energy required to build muscle tissue is taken from fat. I agree this is very unlikely in an experienced lifter.

Also, you should be lifting at least moderately heavy relative to your own strength level to maintain muscle. Muscle is energetically costly for the body to maintain so it will be broken down in a calorie deficit to save energy... Unless you tell the body it still needs that muscle by lifting. You must limit lifting volume, however, as you can't recover as well on a calorie deficit.
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by Kyri
I thought it was generally accepted that absolute beginners can lose fat and gain muscle at the same time. Beginners' muscles or so sensitive to protein synthesis that the energy required to build muscle tissue is taken from fat. I agree this is very unlikely in an experienced lifter.

Also, you should be lifting at least moderately heavy relative to your own strength level to maintain muscle. Muscle is energetically costly for the body to maintain so it will be broken down in a calorie deficit to save energy... Unless you tell the body it still needs that muscle by lifting. You must limit lifting volume, however, as you can't recover as well on a calorie deficit.

Yep, I've got no disagreement with any of that :smile:
Reply 14
Original post by Reality Check
Yep, I've got no disagreement with any of that :smile:

Cheers :biggrin:
I actually disagree, if you're overweight and new to training. Lifting weights, doing steady state cardio and eating a decent amount of protein, a day you can build significant muscle mass. Your body basically burns fat to build muscle mass.

I'm back in the gym after nearly 3 years off. I've lost 15lbs of weight but gained something like 60kgs on my bench press. It is doable. If you need help, let me know
Reply 16
Original post by Angry cucumber
I actually disagree, if you're overweight and new to training. Lifting weights, doing steady state cardio and eating a decent amount of protein, a day you can build significant muscle mass. Your body basically burns fat to build muscle mass.

I'm back in the gym after nearly 3 years off. I've lost 15lbs of weight but gained something like 60kgs on my bench press. It is doable. If you need help, let me know

You lifted for many years beforehand, right? For anyone afraid of "losing their gains", this is a good example of the muscle memory effect. The body never really loses its myosatellite cells and lets you grow like a beginner when you start training again after a long break. In a way, you can never trully lose your gains. But yeah, I agree, new lifters that are overweight can definitely recomp like you described.
Original post by Kyri
You lifted for many years beforehand, right? For anyone afraid of "losing their gains", this is a good example of the muscle memory effect. The body never really loses its myosatellite cells and lets you grow like a beginner when you start training again after a long break. In a way, you can never trully lose your gains. But yeah, I agree, new lifters that are overweight can definitely recomp like you described.

Yes I built a lot of muscle in the past. I'm actually all time PRing on some movements now though

However whilst it's not "ideal" for newbies to build muscle in a deficit. Who cares about ideal, life ain't ideal. only one time better to start than tomorrow - today
Reply 18
Original post by Angry cucumber
However whilst it's not "ideal" for newbies to build muscle in a deficit. Who cares about ideal, life ain't ideal. only one time better to start than tomorrow - today

Well put.

And nice one with the PRs!
Losing weight is not a cup of tea for everyone. Some people can easily lose weight and some people face trouble in losing weight.

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