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Teaching English to speakers of other languages with japanese (manchester)

Hi, wondering if anyone has taken this degree at Manchester university? Got rejected from sheffield for japanese studies, still got to hear back from Durham but as a precaution I am look for other opportunities to apply to
Teaching English in Japan is a goal, i just never found this course when i was first applying.
I am just curious how is the japanese language portion of this course? what level will I be learning the language to? that is my main goal, just learning the language so I can work and communicate in Japan with ease.

thank you
(edited 1 year ago)
"X with Y" courses tend to have "Y" as a "minor" subject, taken to a lesser extent than the main subject - and in the case where Y is a language course, often do not include a year abroad. I would recommend if your aim is to work in Japan (for any purpose) that you do a full, single honours course in Japanese (Studies). You should also aim to study at one with good year abroad options, and that has a well established Japanese department.

I would suggest reading through these comments by someone on TSR who did a Japanese degree -


On what to look for in year abroad options:

Spoiler


On UK uni options:

Spoiler



The above user has also warned about the dangers of choosing a poor course or unestablished one, specifically including Durham which has only recently been offering it I gather and doesn't have a dedicated East Asian Studies department.
(edited 1 year ago)
Reply 2
Original post by artful_lounger
"X with Y" courses tend to have "Y" as a "minor" subject, taken to a lesser extent than the main subject - and in the case where Y is a language course, often do not include a year abroad. I would recommend if your aim is to work in Japan (for any purpose) that you do a full, single honours course in Japanese (Studies). You should also aim to study at one with good year abroad options, and that has a well established Japanese department.

I would suggest reading through these comments by someone on TSR who did a Japanese degree -


On what to look for in year abroad options:

Spoiler


On UK uni options:

Spoiler



The above user has also warned about the dangers of choosing a poor course or unestablished one, specifically including Durham which has only recently been offering it I gather and doesn't have a dedicated East Asian Studies department.

Hi, thank you so much for your reply. Unfortunately because I need to take a foundation year I was only left with two university options for japanese studies with the year abroad, Sheffield and Durham. I did apply to Sheffield, that being my first choice but got rejected last week for reasons that quite baffled me. And Durham, I just received an interview date from them literally 5 mins ago. I'm not really left with much options but Durham at the moment is what I am hoping for as Japanese Studies is what I am aiming to do. I am really stuck on what I should go for but my hopes arent extremely high for Durham at the moment

thank you for your response
Original post by thea_exe
Hi, thank you so much for your reply. Unfortunately because I need to take a foundation year I was only left with two university options for japanese studies with the year abroad, Sheffield and Durham. I did apply to Sheffield, that being my first choice but got rejected last week for reasons that quite baffled me. And Durham, I just received an interview date from them literally 5 mins ago. I'm not really left with much options but Durham at the moment is what I am hoping for as Japanese Studies is what I am aiming to do. I am really stuck on what I should go for but my hopes arent extremely high for Durham at the moment

thank you for your response


Why do you need to do a foundation year? It may be less necessary than you think, or there may be alternatives.
Reply 4
Original post by artful_lounger
Why do you need to do a foundation year? It may be less necessary than you think, or there may be alternatives.

I did not get my a levels i only received an AS level due to having to drop out for personal reasons. I'm 21 now and 'too old' to take my A-Levels apparently so foundation years are my only option I believe
Original post by thea_exe
I did not get my a levels i only received an AS level due to having to drop out for personal reasons. I'm 21 now and 'too old' to take my A-Levels apparently so foundation years are my only option I believe

You certainly could still do A-levels as an independent candidate - seeking tuition from private tutors or a distance learning provider for example - but this may not be the best option.

I would recommend instead you look into Access to HE courses, as these are designed specifically for mature students who have had a gap in their education and are returning to study. They're intensively taught in just one year (like a foundation year) and include study skills training. They're widely accepted for entry to UK degree programmes.

You can fund the tuition fees with an Advanced Learner Loan (but you won't get a "maintenance" loan for other costs) and with am Access Course you have the bonus that if you go on to complete a degree afterwards, the ALL gets written off :smile: also unlike a foundation year it doesn't count against your SFE entitlement for degree level study and you aren't "locked into" an individual uni.
(edited 1 year ago)
Reply 6
Original post by artful_lounger
You certainly could still do A-levels as an independent candidate - seeking tuition from private tutors or a distance learning provider for example - but this may not be the best option.

I would recommend instead you look into Access to HE courses, as these are designed specifically for mature students who have had a gap in their education and are returning to study. They're intensively taught in just one year (like a foundation year) and include study skills training. They're widely accepted for entry to UK degree programmes.

You can fund the tuition fees with an Advanced Learner Loan (but you won't get a "maintenance" loan for other costs) and with am Access Course you have the bonus that if you go on to complete a degree afterwards, the ALL gets written off :smile: also unlike a foundation year it doesn't count against your SFE entitlement for degree level study and you aren't "locked into" an individual uni.

oh wow thank you, ill have a look into access courses maybe ill complete one of them and go uni next year id be left with much more options. I had no idea that was possible thank you very much

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