The Student Room Group

Astronautics career with a physics degree

I am currently in year 12 studying maths, physics and chemistry and for a long time now I've considered physics as the degree I want to go into after my A-levels. I love the subject, especially astrophysics, and have already put a lot of effort into enriching with things specific to the subject. However, as a career I want to go into engineering, specifically astronautics, and I'm wondering if it would be possible to take a masters/doctorate in physics into such a career and if so, what can I do to help my chances? Or should I just pursue a degree in aerospace engineering or something along those lines? Thanks in advance :smile:
Yes. I had a quick look at aeronautical + aerospace degrees a while ago and they require maths and physics. Which you have. You can do a PHD and go to university with physics.
Aeronautics is simply aerospace but just within the earth's atmosphere. Any aeronautical jobs will be perfectly fine with aerospace degrees and vice versa (although there are more aerospace degrees).
I would recommend in terms of helping your chances just doing whatever extra-curricular activities you can. Not all of your extra-curricular activities have to be solely engineering based. I am in year 11 and set up an electronics club at my school (I want to do CS at university). Maybe set up an aeronautical club at your school where you build drones and design planes? My school gave me money to buy a bunch of microcontrollers for the club, so you could buy the drone parts like that. Just ask the headteacher (that's what I did.)

Godspeed
Reply 2
Original post by Gwaldron4
I am currently in year 12 studying maths, physics and chemistry and for a long time now I've considered physics as the degree I want to go into after my A-levels. I love the subject, especially astrophysics, and have already put a lot of effort into enriching with things specific to the subject. However, as a career I want to go into engineering, specifically astronautics, and I'm wondering if it would be possible to take a masters/doctorate in physics into such a career and if so, what can I do to help my chances? Or should I just pursue a degree in aerospace engineering or something along those lines? Thanks in advance :smile:


Aeronautical engineering courses will focus exclusively on the design of satellites, rockets and trajectories. I presume astrophysics will focus on more theoretical concepts in space such as planets, stars, their motion and detection. I have not heard of "astronautics" so I cannot comment on that one.

Original post by frumentarius
Yes. I had a quick look at aeronautical + aerospace degrees a while ago and they require maths and physics. Which you have. You can do a PHD and go to university with physics.
Aeronautics is simply aerospace but just within the earth's atmosphere. Any aeronautical jobs will be perfectly fine with aerospace degrees and vice versa (although there are more aerospace degrees).


The name of the course does not always indicate whether or not it includes space modules. You would think so, but unfortunately it is not always the case. It is therefore better to look at the modules for the given course at the university.
Original post by 0le
Aeronautical engineering courses will focus exclusively on the design of satellites, rockets and trajectories. I presume astrophysics will focus on more theoretical concepts in space such as planets, stars, their motion and detection. I have not heard of "astronautics" so I cannot comment on that one.



The name of the course does not always indicate whether or not it includes space modules. You would think so, but unfortunately it is not always the case. It is therefore better to look at the modules for the given course at the university.

Aerospace is the study of flight within and beyond our atmosphere
Aeronautics is only within our atmosphere
Reply 4
Original post by frumentarius
Aerospace is the study of flight within and beyond our atmosphere
Aeronautics is only within our atmosphere

Did you read anything I wrote? It is irrelevant what is your definition. The fact remains that some universities still offer "aeronautical engineering" degrees which teach space modules:

Imperial College:
https://www.imperial.ac.uk/study/ug/courses/aeronautics-department/aeronautical-engineering/

Loughborough:
https://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/aeronautical-engineering-meng/

I have also studied aeronautical engineering several years ago and covered space modules.
(edited 2 years ago)
Original post by 0le
Did you read anything I wrote? It is irrelevant what is your definition. The fact remains that some universities still offer "aeronautical engineering" degrees which teach space modules:

Imperial College:
https://www.imperial.ac.uk/study/ug/courses/aeronautics-department/aeronautical-engineering/

Loughborough:
https://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/aeronautical-engineering-meng/

I have also studied aeronautical engineering several years ago and covered space modules.

Astronautics is the study outside of our atmosphere. Aeronautics is within our atmosphere. Aerospace is a mix of the 2. Yes you are right Astrophysics is much more theoretical about our planet and solar system.

I'm saying that there isn't much of a point, it is such a niche sector that employers won't particularly care or not. As you said there are modules about space in aeronautics degrees and probably modules about our atmosphere in astronautics degrees. I misread your previous comment sorry.

Quick Reply

Latest

Trending

Trending