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Firming imperial over cambridge

Just prefer the specialised engineering course - but (without sounding rude) has anyone done the same/been in the same position?
The people I thought would be the same 'smartness' at both but studying 2 years of general seemed painful (very certain on my discipline) - is the reputation of Cambridge better than imperial to justify going despite this?
thanks!
Original post by Anonymous
Just prefer the specialised engineering course - but (without sounding rude) has anyone done the same/been in the same position?
The people I thought would be the same 'smartness' at both but studying 2 years of general seemed painful (very certain on my discipline) - is the reputation of Cambridge better than imperial to justify going despite this?
thanks!

I don't really know anything about the engineering courses, but I did have a friend who turned down an Oxford offer for Bristol. I think she didn't like the course structure at Oxford, and is now very happy at Bristol.
The tutorial system at Cambridge is something special, as is the whole collegiate structure. But there is no point going somewhere you would be unhappy..... you have to want to do the work, and be motivated and interested.
In terms of reputation, Imperial has a great reputation, and I'm sure you would do well in the future with a degree from either of the unis. For me, I think it would be about if you were willing to give up the tutorial system and Cambridge experience. Would you actively dislike the Cambridge course?
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Original post by Anonymous
Just prefer the specialised engineering course - but (without sounding rude) has anyone done the same/been in the same position?
The people I thought would be the same 'smartness' at both but studying 2 years of general seemed painful (very certain on my discipline) - is the reputation of Cambridge better than imperial to justify going despite this?
thanks!


Something to note is that depending on what area of engineering you're interested in, doing "general" engineering at Cambridge for two years may not be that different to a course at Imperial. For example, aerospace engineering courses will include pretty much all the same breadth of "general" engineering by necessity anyway. Mechanical engineering would include a lot of the same content as well, and even strictly "optional" aspects (like more electronic engineering) is still useful in terms of preparing you to be a good engineer. The main area I can see there being a lot of unrelated/irrelevant content is electronic engineering, since outside of some applications most of the thermofluids etc is never going to be of much relevance.
Reply 3
Original post by booklover1313
I don't really know anything about the engineering courses, but I did have a friend who turned down an Oxford offer for Bristol. I think she didn't like the course structure at Oxford, and is now very happy at Bristol.
The tutorial system at Cambridge is something special, as is the whole collegiate structure. But there is no point going somewhere you would be unhappy..... you have to want to do the work, and be motivated and interested.
In terms of reputation, Imperial has a great reputation, and I'm sure you would do well in the future with a degree from either of the unis. For me, I think it would be about if you were willing to give up the tutorial system and Cambridge experience. Would you actively dislike the Cambridge course?

Thanks - i think most of the camb course sounds dreadfully dull to me hence why I think I will actively dislike it. After thinking some more imperial it is :smile:
Reply 4
Original post by artful_lounger
Something to note is that depending on what area of engineering you're interested in, doing "general" engineering at Cambridge for two years may not be that different to a course at Imperial. For example, aerospace engineering courses will include pretty much all the same breadth of "general" engineering by necessity anyway. Mechanical engineering would include a lot of the same content as well, and even strictly "optional" aspects (like more electronic engineering) is still useful in terms of preparing you to be a good engineer. The main area I can see there being a lot of unrelated/irrelevant content is electronic engineering, since outside of some applications most of the thermofluids etc is never going to be of much relevance.

Thanks - I agree but my specialised discipline is quite niche (biomedical eng) hence why I dislike the majority of the camb course. If both unis are well regarded and prestigious I think imperial :smile:
Original post by Anonymous
Thanks - I agree but my specialised discipline is quite niche (biomedical eng) hence why I dislike the majority of the camb course. If both unis are well regarded and prestigious I think imperial :smile:


To be honest, the breadth of the general engineering course would be a benefit for biomedical engineering, not a hindrance. It covers a very wide range of engineering systems and approaches (like aerospace engineering) and thus hugely benefits from actual exposure to all those different areas. Biomedical engineering ranges from e.g. biomedical instrumentation (lots of electronics stuff), orthopaedic implants (materials and mechanics) to tissue engineering (various areas, thermofluids probably relevant here) and more widely. And the thing is, it's not just "applied" to BME particularly. The fundamental principles of electronics, mechanics, thermofluids etc, are all the same whether it's a hip joint or a 200 foot crane, a pacemaker or a nuclear control panel, etc.

That said, you seem to have already made a decision though and are looking for validation of that - which is understandable but, if your gut says Imperial go with that!
(edited 2 years ago)
Reply 6
Original post by artful_lounger
To be honest, the breadth of the general engineering course would be a benefit for biomedical engineering, not a hindrance. It covers a very wide range of engineering systems and approaches (like aerospace engineering) and thus hugely benefits from actual exposure to all those different areas. Biomedical engineering ranges from e.g. biomedical instrumentation (lots of electronics stuff), orthopaedic implants (materials and mechanics) to tissue engineering (various areas, thermofluids probably relevant here) and more widely. And the thing is, it's not just "applied" to BME particularly. The fundamental principles of electronics, mechanics, thermofluids etc, are all the same whether it's a hip joint or a 200 foot crane, a pacemaker or a nuclear control panel, etc.

That said, you seem to have already made a decision though and are looking for validation of that - which is understandable but, if your gut says Imperial go with that!

Thanks for your reply - was helpful to hear that. I think you're right about the last bit haha - I just felt as biomed eng is a relatively broad degree in terms of the multidisciplinary concepts learnt (as you said it links in with lots of different fields) then learning them at imperial in the context of biomedicine seems to me much more engaging than learning the same principles in the context of structures/automotive etc.

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