Warwick Economics without further maths

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yesman123
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I hold an offer for Warwick economics but I didn’t take further maths. I am buying “maths for economics” by Geoff Renshaw to prepare me. Has anyone bought this book before and will it prepare me well enough for econ at Warwick?!
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TMan77
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I think from what I have heard, it can be a bit basic if you have A level maths, however, you will still probably learn a thing or two. It’s a good book by the looks of it. Also not having further maths is not that much of a problem for economics. You should be fine.
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yesman123
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(Original post by TMan77)
I think from what I have heard, it can be a bit basic if you have A level maths, however, you will still probably learn a thing or two. It’s a good book by the looks of it. Also not having further maths is not that much of a problem for economics. You should be fine.
I’ve looked into it slightly more and the early chapters look like a build on gcse maths so will be basic. The later chapters cover optimisation and matrices and their applications to economics so hopefully it will be good preparation!!
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BenRyan99
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(Original post by yesman123)
I hold an offer for Warwick economics but I didn’t take further maths. I am buying “maths for economics” by Geoff Renshaw to prepare me. Has anyone bought this book before and will it prepare me well enough for econ at Warwick?!
Personally I've found that the following maths for economics books are the best for undergrad economics at good BSc Economics courses:

- Mathematics for Economists by Simon & Blume

- Further Mathematics for Economic Analysis by Knut Sydsaeter et al. (can also try their more basic book which is Essential Mathematics for Economic Analysis)

- Fundamental Methods of Mathematical Economics by Alpha Chiang

- Mathematics for Economics by Michael Hoy et. al.
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yesman123
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(Original post by BenRyan99)
Personally I've found that the following maths for economics books are the best for undergrad economics at good BSc Economics courses:

- Mathematics for Economists by Simon & Blume

- Further Mathematics for Economic Analysis by Knut Sydsaeter et al. (can also try their more basic book which is Essential Mathematics for Economic Analysis)

- Fundamental Methods of Mathematical Economics by Alpha Chiang

- Mathematics for Economics by Michael Hoy et. al.
Thank you! I will research them. Which would you recommend for someone who hasn’t yet started the degree and just wants to improve their maths?
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BenRyan99
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(Original post by yesman123)
Thank you! I will research them. Which would you recommend for someone who hasn’t yet started the degree and just wants to improve their maths?
No worries! It sort of depends on how much maths you know really. All the books and pretty much all first year first semester maths for Econ classes basically do a bit of revision from a-level maths but frame it in an economic context.

So they all might start from the basics of algebra, simultaneous equation and quadratic functions. Then they'll go onto univariate differentiation, stationary points/max and mins, integration, multivariate calculus, matrix algebra, differential equations and then dynamic systems. There will also be some further topics in each book. So most start in a pretty basic manner and then get progressively harder.

The differences I would say is that the Hoy and Simon & Bloom books are a bit more proof-based so perhaps harder if you're not used to that. Personally I like Alpha Chiang's book as it's well written and very portable (book rather than textbook dimensions) although it's older than the rest. If you wanna work through things slowly and start from the basics then I'd go with Essential Mathematics for Economic Analysis by Sydsaeter et al.

Btw you should definitely buy them off eBay or something than new. For example, when I bought Alpha Chiang's book it was like £40-50 new on the publisher's website but £2.50 on eBay. Also I wouldn't recommend getting the latest editions of these books, just get the cheapest you can get really as they don't change much
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yesman123
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(Original post by BenRyan99)
No worries! It sort of depends on how much maths you know really. All the books and pretty much all first year first semester maths for Econ classes basically do a bit of revision from a-level maths but frame it in an economic context.

So they all might start from the basics of algebra, simultaneous equation and quadratic functions. Then they'll go onto univariate differentiation, stationary points/max and mins, integration, multivariate calculus, matrix algebra, differential equations and then dynamic systems. There will also be some further topics in each book. So most start in a pretty basic manner and then get progressively harder.

The differences I would say is that the Hoy and Simon & Bloom books are a bit more proof-based so perhaps harder if you're not used to that. Personally I like Alpha Chiang's book as it's well written and very portable (book rather than textbook dimensions) although it's older than the rest. If you wanna work through things slowly and start from the basics then I'd go with Essential Mathematics for Economic Analysis by Sydsaeter et al.

Btw you should definitely buy them off eBay or something than new. For example, when I bought Alpha Chiang's book it was like £40-50 new on the publisher's website but £2.50 on eBay. Also I wouldn't recommend getting the latest editions of these books, just get the cheapest you can get really as they don't change much
Thank you for your detailed response!
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