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How do you boost your physics grade

I do Physics A-Level and last year was getting Es. This year I've been trying a bit more and getting literally one mark off a C on every test but need a B. What methods of revision work best for everyone else and how much are you doing a day.
Original post by brown241033
I do Physics A-Level and last year was getting Es. This year I've been trying a bit more and getting literally one mark off a C on every test but need a B. What methods of revision work best for everyone else and how much are you doing a day.

Thre is no one magic fix to this, but you need a mix of working through your notes from school (aiming to understand things, spot common equations and facts, then make a list of the ones to memorise), doing "obvious" questions which are clearly linked the the bit of the subject you are studying, and then doing past exam papers which are often less "obvious".

Getting stuck on past papers NOW, well before the exam and then going round that loop of "read, understand, memorise, practice, test under exam conditions" is a key way of improving.
(edited 2 years ago)
Reply 2
Original post by Mr Wednesday
Thre is no one magic fix to this, but you need a mix of working through your notes from school (aiming to understand things, spot common equations and facts, then make a list of the ones to memorise), doing "obvious" questions which are clearly linked the the bit of the subject you are studying, and then doing past exam papers which are often less "obvious".

Getting stuck on past papers NOW, well before the exam and then going round that loop of "read, understand, memorise, practice, test under exam conditions" is a key way of improving.

Thank you that's really helpful
Hey!

First of all, finish freaking out and get yourself in a good mental space.

This is how what I would do if I was in your position:

- Read the course-book for each of the subject

- Make short notes, quickly. Don't focus on aesthetics or the design, just ensure its readable.

- Skim through the complete syllabus from the official qualification-provider’s website. Ensure that you’re able to state answers for almost the entire curriculum. Use the syllabus document to cover other concepts that you could have missed out.

- Work on official past-papers that are available online. I’d recommend leaving the latest papers (2021 in this case) for a week before you’re actual A-Levels. Start working backwards until you begin to feel confident.

- If you have spare time after all this, you could either revise the past papers you’ve completed, or you could challenge yourself by trying out more complex and advanced questions. Perhaps you could try solving university-level questions or university-admissions tests like the PAT, NSAA, ENGAA or even Olympiads/Challenges like the BPhO.

Since I applied to Oxford for Physics in 2020, I used the Ultimate Oxford PAT Collection by Uni Admissions during my preparation. While this was meant for the PAT, the PAT (Physics Aptitude Test for Oxford) by itself is tested on A-Level portions, hence you could use this book. I personally found the book to be very helpful since it has a lot of questions that are both similar to those on the real exam and those that are unique and force you think outside the box. One other benefit was the extremely detailed marking schemes that bridged all the gaps in my learning. I've linked the book below in case you’d like to use it in the future!

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Ultimate-PAT-Collection-breakdowns-UniAdmissions/dp/1913683877

Youtube is probably going to be your bestfriend for the next month - it has videos for almost every concept that you might be struggling in, but I’d recommend watching the videos that are made for A-Level.

PS: you can also check edX, udemy and coursera - I’ve heard there are quite a few courses available especially for subjects like math and certain physics concepts like nuclear- and atomic-physics. Also look out for the Further Math course by Imperial College London which is available on one of these platforms for free if I'm not wrong!

Best of luck!
(edited 2 years ago)
Reply 4
Original post by EnthuGeek21
Hey!

First of all, finish freaking out and get yourself in a good mental space.

This is how what I would do if I was in your position:

- Read the course-book for each of the subject

- Make short notes, quickly. Don't focus on aesthetics or the design, just ensure its readable.

- Skim through the complete syllabus from the official qualification-provider’s website. Ensure that you’re able to state answers for almost the entire curriculum. Use the syllabus document to cover other concepts that you could have missed out.

- Work on official past-papers that are available online. I’d recommend leaving the latest papers (2021 in this case) for a week before you’re actual A-Levels. Start working backwards until you begin to feel confident.

- If you have spare time after all this, you could either revise the past papers you’ve completed, or you could challenge yourself by trying out more complex and advanced questions. Perhaps you could try solving university-level questions or university-admissions tests like the PAT, NSAA, ENGAA or even Olympiads/Challenges like the BPhO.

Since I applied to Oxford for Physics in 2020, I used the Ultimate Oxford PAT Collection by Uni Admissions during my preparation. While this was meant for the PAT, the PAT (Physics Aptitude Test for Oxford) by itself is tested on A-Level portions, hence you could use this book. I personally found the book to be very helpful since it has a lot of questions that are both similar to those on the real exam and those that are unique and force you think outside the box. One other benefit was the extremely detailed marking schemes that bridged all the gaps in my learning. I've linked the book below in case you’d like to use it in the future!

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Ultimate-PAT-Collection-breakdowns-UniAdmissions/dp/1913683877

Youtube is probably going to be your bestfriend for the next month - it has videos for almost every concept that you might be struggling in, but I’d recommend watching the videos that are made for A-Level.

PS: you can also check edX, udemy and coursera - I’ve heard there are quite a few courses available especially for subjects like math and certain physics concepts like nuclear- and atomic-physics. Also look out for the Further Math course by Imperial College London which is available on one of these platforms for free if I'm not wrong!

Best of luck!

Thank you so much, you've really given me a lot of good ideas !

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