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An Inspector Calls essay - could you look through and say any changes

Within Priestley’s didactic play, “An Inspector Calls”, he uses Mr Birling as a vehicle to explore the capitalist views and hierarchy within that time period.

In “An Inspector Calls”, Mr birling is used to emphasise the capitalist hierarchy that Mr Birling and Priestly both live by. This is shown within Look after himself and his own”. From the quote, the audience can get a sense of hierarchal attitude from Mr Birling, emphasising the he believes that the working class should look after themselves, the upper class should look out for the upper class, etc. Within the quote, Mr Birling is used masculine pronouns when talking about a business man, saying “look after himself …. His own”. This is ironic within the Birling’s household, as in the families hierarchy, Mr Birling is lower than his wife in power. This would be unheard of in 1945 as the women was suppose to be a “house-wife” doing chores, which could include cleaning, cooking, etc. This shows that Mr Birling only cares for himself and his family, and people within the same social class as him.

Additionally, Priestly uses Mr Birling as an unchangeable character within the play. For example, when he refuses to back down to the Inspector when it is suggested that he is partly to blame for Eva’s death , as exemplified by - “I can’t accept any responsibility”. Within the quote, Mr Birling states that he cannot have “any” responsibility to do with Eva Smith death / suicide. This shows the obnoxious and arrogant views that Mr Birling goes by each day. Further the play, other character such as Shelia, have a reality check on what each person’s interactions with Eva has on her suicide. But, on the other hand, Mr birling is stuck in his ways never crossing his mind that he might has a role to do with the death. The emphasises the arrogance that Priestly is portraying within Arthur Birling and therefore his capitalism.

Finally, JB Priestly exploits the hierarchical and capitalist viewpoints of Mr Birling with his play, “An Inspector Calls” when Inspector Google comes knocking to investigate the suicide of a previously employed worker for Mr Birling and his company. When the inspector makes any regard to the murder possibly being linked to the unemployment of Eva by Arthur Birling Mr Birling shuts down the Inspector and offers him a drink of port, symbolising the wealth of the birling family. As a professional, the Inspector declines the offer saying that “I’m on duty”. This could be a symbolistic gesture to almost bribe the inspector into not looking and / or investigating any further.
Original post by Alfie_Hensman
Within Priestley’s didactic play, “An Inspector Calls”, he uses Mr Birling as a vehicle to explore the capitalist views and hierarchy within that time period.

Good introduction. Mention that he is unchangeable and that the play is set in 1912 rather than "that time period". Counts towards your understanding of the context :smile:
Original post by Alfie_Hensman
In “An Inspector Calls”, Mr Birling is used to emphasise the capitalist hierarchy that Mr Birling and Priestley both live by.

Clarify this. Priestley doesn't live by it, he is critical of it. You can say that he and Mr Birling lived in a capitalist society and Mr Birling emphasizes the hierarchy.
Original post by Alfie_Hensman
This is shown within Look after himself and his own”. From the quote, the audience can get a sense of hierarchal attitude from Mr Birling, emphasising the he believes that the working class should look after themselves, the upper class should look out for the upper class, etc. Within the quote, Mr Birling is used masculine pronouns when talking about a business man, saying “look after himself …. His own”. This is ironic within the Birling household, as in the family's hierarchy, Mr Birling is lower than his wife in status (not power!) This would be unheard of in 1945 as the women was suppose to be a “house-wife” doing chores, which could include cleaning and cooking. This shows that Mr Birling only cares for himself and his family, and people within the same social class as him.

The contextual background is insightful, but don't talk too much about gender divides as a context when your point is capitalism. You could do more language analysis.
The quote you're using, I believe is,
"a man has to make his own way—has to look after himself—and his family, too"
You can talk about the repetition of his, which highlights how the hierarchy forces men to work hard. The parenthesis of "has to look after himself" puts importance on the matter, making" and his family too" look like an afterthought.
Original post by Alfie_Hensman
Additionally, Priestly uses Mr Birling as an unchangeable character within the play. For example, when he refuses to back down to the Inspector when it is suggested that he is partly to blame for Eva’s death , as exemplified by - “I can’t accept any responsibility”. Within the quote, Mr Birling states that he cannot have “any” responsibility to do with Eva Smith's suicide.

Just a little language pointer - "any" is a quantifier. You could also talk about "accept", which is a defensive verb that links back to his inability to change.
Original post by Alfie_Hensman
This shows the obnoxious and arrogant views that Mr Birling goes by each day. Further on in the play, other characters such as Shelia, have a reality check on what each person’s interactions with Eva has on her suicide.

Could you use a quote here? I think for Sheila you could use the quote: 'But these girls aren’t cheap labour they’re people.' Make sure to analyse the language! Also, "reality check" is a bit informal. You could say that they "come to a realization (that)".
Original post by Alfie_Hensman
But, on the other hand, Mr Birling is stuck in his ways never crossing his mind that he might has a role to do with the death. This emphasises the arrogance that Priestly is portraying within Arthur Birling and therefore his capitalism.
Finally, JB Priestley exploits the hierarchical and capitalist viewpoints of Mr Birling with his play, “An Inspector Calls” when Inspector Google comes knocking to investigate the suicide of a previously employed worker for Mr Birling and his company.

Priestley doesn't exploit the views, he created them for Mr Birling - a character.
Original post by Alfie_Hensman
When the inspector makes any regard to the murder possibly being linked to the unemployment of Eva by Arthur Birling Mr Birling shuts down the Inspector and offers him a drink of port, symbolising the wealth of the Birling family. As a professional, the Inspector declines the offer saying that “I’m on duty”. This could be a symbolistic gesture to almost bribe the inspector into not looking or investigating any further.

You could add this to link it to the idea of being unchangeable: "investigating any further, which links to his inability to change."
The last point is like a rehash of the first - is it meant to be its own idea?

I think your essay is very well-rounded and your contextual knowledge and understanding of the themes is good, I hope some of the (particularly AO2) advice helps! :redface:
Hello, thank you for you ideas, I added these ideas on to my exam and got an extra grade from the high amount of detail and content. Thank you for your help : )

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