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How to get straight 9's in 4 weeks?

There are 4 weeks till my first exam. Can I have some advice for how to revise for each subject?

Maths - 7
Further Maths - N/A
Biology - 7
Chemistry - 8
Physics - 6
Literature - 7
Language - 8
Chinese - 6
RS Christianity - 9

These are the grades I got in my mocks. Do you think it's possible to get all 9's with 4 weeks of revision?

I'm willing to put in the work in and I really want all 9's or Atleast all 9's and a few 8's.
Original post by Joe6753
There are 4 weeks till my first exam. Can I have some advice for how to revise for each subject?

Maths - 7
Further Maths - N/A
Biology - 7
Chemistry - 8
Physics - 6
Literature - 7
Language - 8
Chinese - 6
RS Christianity - 9

These are the grades I got in my mocks. Do you think it's possible to get all 9's with 4 weeks of revision?

I'm willing to put in the work in and I really want all 9's or Atleast all 9's and a few 8's.


The problem with these types of threads is that usually the user wants an answer along the lines of ‘yes, you can do it!’. The problem with that answer is that it isn’t always realistic.

Of course you are willing to put the work in and who doesn’t want all 8’s and 9’s? For some of your subjects, an 8 or a 9 is possible. But for some of them, it is a bit unrealistic. Do you really think that you can jump from a 6 to an 8/9 in 4 weeks?

How are you currently revising?
(edited 1 year ago)
Reply 2
Original post by 5hyl33n
The problem with these types of threads is that usually the user wants an answer along the lines of ‘yes, you can do it!’. The problem with that answer is that it isn’t always realistic.

Of course you are willing to put the work in and who doesn’t want all 8’s and 9’s? For some of your subjects, an 8 or a 9 is possible. But for some of them, it is a bit unrealistic. Do you really think that you can jump from a 6 to an 8/9 in 4 weeks?

How are you currently revising?


Sorry those grades are incorrect. It's from the mock previous to this. Here are ones that I've got after more revision and they're more recent.

Maths - 8
FM - N/A
Bio - 7
Chemistry - 8
Physics - 7
Literature - 8
Language - 9
Chinese - 7 (2% off 8)
RS Christianity - 9

I've been reading notes only so I understand the content. I've started answering past paper questions for each topic, and then going to move onto whole past papers in 2 weeks.

I'm not looking for a 'you can do it', but more so how can I do it. Learning bio content is what I'm struggling with, as well as questions for further maths. I'm decent with the essay subjects, but I'm mainly looking for help with:

Biology, chemistry, physics, further maths.
Original post by Joe6753
Sorry those grades are incorrect. It's from the mock previous to this. Here are ones that I've got after more revision and they're more recent.

Maths - 8
FM - N/A
Bio - 7
Chemistry - 8
Physics - 7
Literature - 8
Language - 9
Chinese - 7 (2% off 8)
RS Christianity - 9

I've been reading notes only so I understand the content. I've started answering past paper questions for each topic, and then going to move onto whole past papers in 2 weeks.

I'm not looking for a 'you can do it', but more so how can I do it. Learning bio content is what I'm struggling with, as well as questions for further maths. I'm decent with the essay subjects, but I'm mainly looking for help with:

Biology, chemistry, physics, further maths.

You have generally improved, so well done. :smile:

Since your first exam is in 4 weeks, I suggest you move straight on exam questions/past papers. You shouldn't really be in the 'learning content stage' at this point. Apart from that, you are doing all the right things. It's just about practice. I didn't take FM at GCSE, so I'm not in the best position to advise for that. But for the sciences, you have to remember that there are only so many questions that they can ask you. It's not the best way to approach exams, but the majority of the questions in a past paper are written in a very similar way. What distinguishes between the top grade (9) and a 'lower' grade (7/8) is the ability to link knowledge to an unknown scenario.
Reply 4
Original post by 5hyl33n
You have generally improved, so well done. :smile:

Since your first exam is in 4 weeks, I suggest you move straight on exam questions/past papers. You shouldn't really be in the 'learning content stage' at this point. Apart from that, you are doing all the right things. It's just about practice. I didn't take FM at GCSE, so I'm not in the best position to advise for that. But for the sciences, you have to remember that there are only so many questions that they can ask you. It's not the best way to approach exams, but the majority of the questions in a past paper are written in a very similar way. What distinguishes between the top grade (9) and a 'lower' grade (7/8) is the ability to link knowledge to an unknown scenario.


Alright. How did you go about learning content for your biology exam?

It's the one subject I've struggled w learning content and left.
Original post by Joe6753
Alright. How did you go about learning content for your biology exam?

It's the one subject I've struggled w learning content and left.


Same way as I did for every other subject:
Look through the specification. Tick off all the points that I knew about. Highlighted the ones, I didn’t.
Used the revision guide/textbook to learn the content.
Attempted exam-questions.
I'm a year 12 student. I did all your subjects except Chinese, getting all A*s and a distinction in FM. Obviously, it was a bit different last year as we didn't sit exams but my school was super stringent and we had lots of mocks and tests etc. that we had to prepare for basically like the real exams.

So anyways, the short answer to your question is: if you understand everything and have paid attention in class like really well, then yes. Prioritise your weaker subjects, look at your mocks: what did you get wrong? and most importantly, why did you get it wrong? Is it topic knowledge? Then go over that topic. Is it exam technique? Then practice. Find good concise resources for your subject (e.g. BBC bitesize) as they can be quite a good refresher of the overall topics and a good way to start your revision and then just practice, practice, practice. Keep a doc with concepts you forgot, things you got wrong etc. and go over them in more detail. For biology, pay attention to the mark schemes: what key words do they want? Don't waste time going over things you know and practicing easy questions. Especially with something like math, if you've mastered say circles, then you can skip the odd circle question on exam papers and just take a look at the mark scheme to make sure you had the right general idea. Same with a lot of chemistry calculations and any generally repetitive questions. For English literature, I'd recommend writing essays and getting your teacher (or if you can't maybe a friend who's good at literature) to mark it. The second step is so important as just writing essays without improving on them will not lead to anything. For physics, the thing a lot of people fall into is just plugging stuff into equations without actually understanding the physics behind it. Being able to work with equations can get you a lot of marks but when it comes to the 'discriminator' questions which distinguish the best candidates, you need to understand what's actually going on from the physics point.

That's what personally worked for me as someone who's a bit of a crammer but obviously try stuff and if it doesn't work, then it doesn't. Don't fall into the trap of thinking you have to make flashcards or use this specific textbook just because xyz did. Best of luck!!
(edited 1 year ago)
Reply 7
Original post by Mocha Latte
I'm a year 12 student. I did all your subjects except Chinese, getting all A*s and a distinction in FM. Obviously, it was a bit different last year as we didn't sit exams but my school was super stringent and we had lots of mocks and tests etc. that we had to prepare for basically like the real exams.

So anyways, the short answer to your question is: if you understand everything and have paid attention in class like really well, then yes. Prioritise your weaker subjects, look at your mocks: what did you get wrong? and most importantly, why did you get it wrong? Is it topic knowledge? Then go over that topic. Is it exam technique? Then practice. Find good concise resources for your subject (e.g. BBC bitesize) as they can be quite a good refresher of the overall topics and a good way to start your revision and then just practice, practice, practice. Keep a doc with concepts you forgot, things you got wrong etc. and go over them in more detail. For biology, pay attention to the mark schemes: what key words do they want? Don't waste time going over things you know and practicing easy questions. Especially with something like math, if you've mastered say circles, then you can skip the odd circle question on exam papers and just take a look at the mark scheme to make sure you had the right general idea. Same with a lot of chemistry calculations and any generally repetitive questions. For English literature, I'd recommend writing essays and getting your teacher (or if you can't maybe a friend who's good at literature) to mark it. The second step is so important as just writing essays without improving on them will not lead to anything. For physics, the thing a lot of people fall into is just plugging stuff into equations without actually understanding the physics behind it. Being able to work with equations can get you a lot of marks but when it comes to the 'discriminator' questions which distinguish the best candidates, you need to understand what's actually going on from the physics point.

That's what personally worked for me as someone who's a bit of a crammer but obviously try stuff and if it doesn't work, then it doesn't. Don't fall into the trap of thinking you have to make flashcards or use this specific textbook just because xyz did. Best of luck!!


Thanks for the help.

How did you go about revising further maths? That's also something I've struggled with.

In terms of sciences, did you just answer past paper questions and also how did you learn the content, especially for biology?
Original post by Joe6753
Thanks for the help.

How did you go about revising further maths? That's also something I've struggled with.

In terms of sciences, did you just answer past paper questions and also how did you learn the content, especially for biology?


For FM:
1. Check out the specification. Have a read of it. Does everything sound at least vaguely familiar to you? If there's something you think you've never heard of before, ask your teacher asap
2. Practice! Now there's two types of practice: past papers and topic questions. I'd recommend starting with topic questions. I don't know your exam board, but there should be question collections by topic on the internet or you can use the textbook if you have it. Go through topic by topic. You don't have to do all questions - just enough to master it.
3. Practice past paper questions. Like a lot of them. Aim to at least do the past 5 or so years. If you're struggling with a particular style fo question, I'd recommend you go even further back and find questions on it from older past papers.

Ultimately, maths and FM are just a matter of a lot of practice.

For biology, I used BBC bitesize and my notes I took from class. I'd read the notes - making sure I was engaged in it so like jotting down stuff or writing up my own questions. Then yes it really was just a matter of practice. Anki is quite nice for memorising some of the annoying details but if you plan to use it, set it up now as it's better to go through the flashcards over a longer period of time. And then yeah I mainly just did a lot of past paper questions. For biology, as it was the hardest science for me, I'd usually do all the relevant past papers up to like around 2004.
Original post by Joe6753
There are 4 weeks till my first exam. Can I have some advice for how to revise for each subject?

Maths - 7
Further Maths - N/A
Biology - 7
Chemistry - 8
Physics - 6
Literature - 7
Language - 8
Chinese - 6
RS Christianity - 9

These are the grades I got in my mocks. Do you think it's possible to get all 9's with 4 weeks of revision?

I'm willing to put in the work in and I really want all 9's or Atleast all 9's and a few 8's.

I think it's hard to guarantee straight 9s even if you have the best revision plan in the world because you never know what will come up in an exam. Nevertheless you can absolutely improve some of those by focusing on your weaknesses and practicing exam questions. If there's a subject that you really want to boost e.g. you might want to take it at a level or you know you are close to the next grade, I would focus on those primarily. Look through previous feedback from your mocks/ classwork and try to identify weak topics. Then determine if its the knowledge or the exam technique which is the problem and target that. Active recall is great for retaining knowledge so flashcards would work and if it's exam technique then I would highly recommend doing as many practice questions as possible (this will help test your knowledge retention too).

Specifically for essay subjects I would recommend practicing planning out answers to questions (you can make these up yourself). This will help you with exam technique if you do them under time pressure and if you start to remember them, you may even be able to use parts of them in your real exams if a relevant question comes up. For example when I did French I had memorised some stock sentences (particularly with more complex tenses) for my writing/ speaking exam which I could then regurgitate knowing full well I hadn't made an error in them.
Use Quizlet for chinese - there will be lots of gcse content sets available. Get the app, and search for things like 'gcse food' or 'gcse tourism'.
That can really help.
I found the textbooks really helpful for the sciences, go through them like this:
read the page
cover it up
write down what you can remember, in a condense form
then in a different pen write down information that you forgot
Original post by Joe6753
Thanks for the help.

How did you go about revising further maths? That's also something I've struggled with.

In terms of sciences, did you just answer past paper questions and also how did you learn the content, especially for biology?

The number 1 thing with further maths is https://corbettmaths.com/
Best thing ever
Covers all the syllabus and has videos on each topic.
I have a 9 in FM from this dude
Reply 12
Original post by booklover1313
Use Quizlet for chinese - there will be lots of gcse content sets available. Get the app, and search for things like 'gcse food' or 'gcse tourism'.
That can really help.
I found the textbooks really helpful for the sciences, go through them like this:
read the page
cover it up
write down what you can remember, in a condense form
then in a different pen write down information that you forgot


For my GCSE's, we're only getting tested on the published vocab list so i made quizlets for them and from tomorrow im doing 1 topic a day (I have 13 to cover). I have my speaking exam in 15 days so I'll be able to finish 1 a day and then have 2 days to fill gaps.
Reply 13
Original post by frumentarius
The number 1 thing with further maths is https://corbettmaths.com/
Best thing ever
Covers all the syllabus and has videos on each topic.
I have a 9 in FM from this dude


Thanks a lot! I have this Hodders maths book for FM so I'll use the CorbettMaths resources alongside this.
Original post by Joe6753
Thanks a lot! I have this Hodders maths book for FM so I'll use the CorbettMaths resources alongside this.

More accurately use this link https://corbettmaths.com/more/further-maths/
Reply 15
Hi, these are my most recent mock grade
Maths - 8
Eng Lit - 8
Eng lang - 9
Bio - 9
chem - 9
physics - 9
Computer science - 8
psychology - 8
History - 8
i havent done much revision yet and there are 5 weeks yet , do u think it is possible to get all 9's

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