The Student Room Group
Carr Saunders Halls, LSE
London School of Economics
London

Need some advice - MSc Economics

Hi folks, I hope you are having a great week. I am a prospective student and I was considering applying to LSE's MSc Economics. I genuinely need your help :smile:

So one of the program's requirements is GRE/GMAT. However, the GRE and GMAT section of LSE's website states that I can request a waiver "if I do not have sufficient funds to pay for a GRE or GMAT test." Now the thing is, I do not have a GRE/GMAT score and I contacted the admission committee to discuss more on this. They said that I can select this option while filling out the form and they would consider the application and stated "However, please note that the Department of Economics reserves the right to request a GRE score if our academic selectors believe it is appropriate to do so."

Now my queries are:

1. I have a degree in Economics with a high GPA and my core modules were heavily mathematically intensive. My couple of volunteering work and an internship were centred around econometric methods as well. My junior college had intensive mathematics too. Do you think I should go and apply to that course and they would accept my GRE/GMAT waiver condition?

2. Considering this is a competitive course, do you think it will hamper my chances of getting in? I think I am already late as we are in April, although all my documents are ready.

3. Does anyone have any first-person experience with this?

4. How difficult it is to get into the course, even if you have a relevant degree, high GPA, relevant internship, and extracurriculars? Do you recommend giving up this cycle and apply for the next year's intake?

I hope this will not get ignored. I really need your help. I would appreciate any leads and information. Thank you so much :smile:
I'll be honest with you, there are plenty of other international applicants applying to this course with extremely high GPA or even perfect GPA - given they require a 1st class equivalent. In China for example (which saw 334 applications out of the total 1072 from the 2021 cycle), this would mean a minimum of 88%, with an average of 93% (see below). You definitely have an excellent profile, however do not underestimate the applicant pool.

They will be applying with GRE as required, and most of them will apply with extremely good scores because GRE/GMAT isn't that hard for most of them given their high academic standards. So I'd say this would put you at a slight disadvantage when they are deciding between candidates.

It's difficult to get into MSc Economics for sure considering the competition, given they look way past your academic background into things like motivation, interests and what you can contribute to the programme.

However, I'd suggest trying in this cycle - as it is already April and if I'm not wrong, based on last years application cycle, the course might close to new applicants soon (I'd suggest using webpage time machine on their programme availability page to check the rough timeframe).

If you get rejected - then you would probably need a good GRE score or work on other aspects of your application.

If you get accepted or make it into the reserves list, then you know that GRE isn't required in your case :smile:

Hope this helps.

"To be considered for admission to a taught master's programme (first-class equivalent), we would normally require a bachelor's degree with an overall mark of 88 per cent from applicants who have attended a highly regarded institution in China, while all other applicants are normally required to obtain a mark of 93 per cent."
Carr Saunders Halls, LSE
London School of Economics
London
Original post by Anonymous
I'll be honest with you, there are plenty of other international applicants applying to this course with extremely high GPA or even perfect GPA - given they require a 1st class equivalent. In China for example (which saw 334 applications out of the total 1072 from the 2021 cycle), this would mean a minimum of 88%, with an average of 93% (see below). You definitely have an excellent profile, however do not underestimate the applicant pool.

They will be applying with GRE as required, and most of them will apply with extremely good scores because GRE/GMAT isn't that hard for most of them given their high academic standards. So I'd say this would put you at a slight disadvantage when they are deciding between candidates.

It's difficult to get into MSc Economics for sure considering the competition, given they look way past your academic background into things like motivation, interests and what you can contribute to the programme.

However, I'd suggest trying in this cycle - as it is already April and if I'm not wrong, based on last years application cycle, the course might close to new applicants soon (I'd suggest using webpage time machine on their programme availability page to check the rough timeframe).

If you get rejected - then you would probably need a good GRE score or work on other aspects of your application.

If you get accepted or make it into the reserves list, then you know that GRE isn't required in your case :smile:

Hope this helps.

"To be considered for admission to a taught master's programme (first-class equivalent), we would normally require a bachelor's degree with an overall mark of 88 per cent from applicants who have attended a highly regarded institution in China, while all other applicants are normally required to obtain a mark of 93 per cent."

Hey, thank you so much for your informative reply. It is really helpful. I agree with what you have said. LSE's MSc Economics is still my backup option, and therefore I am exploring different courses to apply to and ensuring that they are worth going to if my target school (UCL's MSc Finance) rejects me.

I think I would still apply to LSE, however the following two factors are going to affect my chances regardless of my strong profile.
1. GRE/GMAT scores.
2. Nearing the deadline, and the seats are mostly filled.

Let's see what happens, I will let you know for sure. Thank you :smile:
Original post by Anonymous
Hey, thank you so much for your informative reply. It is really helpful. I agree with what you have said. LSE's MSc Economics is still my backup option, and therefore I am exploring different courses to apply to and ensuring that they are worth going to if my target school (UCL's MSc Finance) rejects me.

I think I would still apply to LSE, however the following two factors are going to affect my chances regardless of my strong profile.
1. GRE/GMAT scores.
2. Nearing the deadline, and the seats are mostly filled.

Let's see what happens, I will let you know for sure. Thank you :smile:

Best of luck :smile:, hope you hear some good news from UCL as well!

Just to let you know if the programme is full and you make it into the reserves list, there's still a chance as not everyone accepts their offer, though they will only let you know rather late.

Also GAO will be on easter break from 14-20 April so application processing times after the easter break will take slightly longer than usual.
Original post by Anonymous
Best of luck :smile:, hope you hear some good news from UCL as well!

Just to let you know if the programme is full and you make it into the reserves list, there's still a chance as not everyone accepts their offer, though they will only let you know rather late.

Also GAO will be on easter break from 14-20 April so application processing times after the easter break will take slightly longer than usual.

sure, thank you so much for that tip! Really helpful, I will make sure I would apply asap. Merci!

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