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tudors a level coursework source help

hello! my coursework is due at the end of the weekend and I am really struggling to find a source and interpretation for Tudor foreign policy. I have an interpretation that says Henry vii's foreign policy was defensive, so if anyone knows any opposing views I would be so grateful!
and anywhere to find foreign policy sources? I have a letter and a treaty, I was thinking about a speech, but have no idea where to find them or which one I would choose.

thank you so so much if you decide to help!
Original post by bookausten
hello! my coursework is due at the end of the weekend and I am really struggling to find a source and interpretation for Tudor foreign policy. I have an interpretation that says Henry vii's foreign policy was defensive, so if anyone knows any opposing views I would be so grateful!
and anywhere to find foreign policy sources? I have a letter and a treaty, I was thinking about a speech, but have no idea where to find them or which one I would choose.

thank you so so much if you decide to help!


I would just look in a few books on Henry VII (try your local library) and use the index to refer to foreign policy and see if you can find any quotes which support that Henry VII's foreign policy was something other than defensive (it'll probably be financial gain, perhaps evident in the Treaty of Étaples and the pension received from that). A great bio on Henry VII is Penn's Winter King but I am not sure what he argued on this, I have read the book though and highlighted some bits so I can check if you would like.

For foreign policy sources, I would look within biographies, e.g. one on Mary I for her foreign policy, and they often have quotes. Do you need the source to cover a particular monarch? You could always consider Elizabeth I's Tilbury Speech if you want to do a speech. Or possibly you could do Mary I's speech in London against Wyatt Rebellion (and link it back in with the English reaction to the Spanish marriage and that area of foreign policy).

Otherwise, I would advise that you consider another type of source, like an ambassador's report (this could be difficult though if you cannot use a letter again) or perhaps a chronicle, like Hall's Chronicle, or The chronicle of Queen Jane, and of two years of Queen Mary, or something like John Foxe's Book of Martyrs will probably reference Mary I's Spanish and French foreign policy. You can find these sources online.
Original post by hamlethoratio
I would just look in a few books on Henry VII (try your local library) and use the index to refer to foreign policy and see if you can find any quotes which support that Henry VII's foreign policy was something other than defensive (it'll probably be financial gain, perhaps evident in the Treaty of Étaples and the pension received from that). A great bio on Henry VII is Penn's Winter King but I am not sure what he argued on this, I have read the book though and highlighted some bits so I can check if you would like.

For foreign policy sources, I would look within biographies, e.g. one on Mary I for her foreign policy, and they often have quotes. Do you need the source to cover a particular monarch? You could always consider Elizabeth I's Tilbury Speech if you want to do a speech. Or possibly you could do Mary I's speech in London against Wyatt Rebellion (and link it back in with the English reaction to the Spanish marriage and that area of foreign policy).

Otherwise, I would advise that you consider another type of source, like an ambassador's report (this could be difficult though if you cannot use a letter again) or perhaps a chronicle, like Hall's Chronicle, or The chronicle of Queen Jane, and of two years of Queen Mary, or something like John Foxe's Book of Martyrs will probably reference Mary I's Spanish and French foreign policy. You can find these sources online.

wow, thank you so so much! I'll try to check that out!

I don't think it does have to cover a particular monarch (thankfully, haha) so I will take a look at those speeches! though, I hadn't considered a chronicle so I will definitely research those, thank you for your suggestions :smile:
See if you can find history books at your local library. Regarding foreign policy sources your best bet is the Internet but mention whatever source you use. Ambassador’s reports are a great source of information too. Old newspapers dating from that time may yield more useful details. Make notes.
Original post by bookausten
wow, thank you so so much! I'll try to check that out!

I don't think it does have to cover a particular monarch (thankfully, haha) so I will take a look at those speeches! though, I hadn't considered a chronicle so I will definitely research those, thank you for your suggestions :smile:

No problem! I’m super into the Tudor period and have been researching it myself for a fair few years now so let me know if you need any more help :smile: particularly on Henry VIII or Mary I!
Original post by hamlethoratio
No problem! I’m super into the Tudor period and have been researching it myself for a fair few years now so let me know if you need any more help :smile: particularly on Henry VIII or Mary I!

oh thank you! a quick question: do you think camden's annales count as a contemporary source? it was published twenty years out, so I'm worried they'll think it's no good!
Original post by bookausten
oh thank you! a quick question: do you think camden's annales count as a contemporary source? it was published twenty years out, so I'm worried they'll think it's no good!

Publication date doesn’t really matter I don’t think as several primary sources are published several years later. Since Camden was alive in Elizabeth’s reign, I think you can count it as a primary source because he experienced her reign and would have memories for it. You could argue he’s an early historian of her reign but I think you can definitely get away with saying it’s a primary source. I mean people count Foxe’s Book of Martyrs as a primary source on Mary I’s reign even though he was exiled during it and the book was published a few years after her death. I would just make sure to acknowledge the time gap in your source analysis whilst justifying its value as a primary source (Camden had memories and interacted with Elizabethans like Lord Burghley etc.)

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