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Considering homeschooling for year 13?

Honestly I really hate college. I'm losing my friends and I'm really not interested in speaking to anyone in my classes (which is mutual), so I just want to spend a year or two at home (for the sake of my mental health). I would like to go to university, so I'm wondering if homeschooling will affect my chances of going to university in any way?

I'm not too worried about the education side of things, moreso the arrangements of exams and other things such as financial worries. I'm doing english (lang & lit), history and art which have coursework so I'm not really sure how that would work either.
(edited 2 years ago)
Reply 1
Original post by venuswbu
Honestly I really hate college. I'm losing my friends and I'm really not interested in speaking to anyone in my classes (which is mutual), so I just want to spend a year or two at home (for the sake of my mental health). I would like to go to university, so I'm wondering if homeschooling will affect my chances of going to university in any way?

I'm not too worried about the education side of things, moreso the arrangements of exams and other things such as financial worries. I'm doing english (lang & lit), history and art which have coursework so I'm not really sure how that would work either.


How far is college from you? College is mainly about education rather than the number of friends you have. I dont put in as much effort in sixth form as I should however I do work when I get home to catch up. Just try your best in college, your teachers are there to support you, ignore others in your class, and you should be good. College can be a stressful period and although Im not too sure about your circumstances Im not sure leaving school altogether is justified just to focus on your mental health.

Also, college is free and homeschooling isn't :smile:
Reply 2
If you're taking AQA Art then it isn't open to private candidates. It's also almost impossible for private candidates to take other exam board's specs too - they're just less specific about it. To do the NEA for English and History you would need someone that the centre where you're entering for the exam was happy supervising, authenticating and marking your work (and you'd have to pay them for this). This is hard to achieve. Plus there's the costs of paying to take the A level exams themselves. I'd say stick it out at college if you possible can.
For the sake of one year, I'd suggest you stick it out. If you switch to homeschooling now, you're going to have to get used to that while at the same time doing your university applications without the help that you'd get at college, and figuring out how to enter (and pay for) your A levels as a private candidate. As someone already pointed out to you, that's a significant (sometimes insurmountable) problem for subjects with coursework.
Art will be very difficult to take at home. It's difficult enough (although not impossible) for GCSE students to take art at home, let alone for A Level.

There are many students who home educate their way through A Levels, but it's extremely expensive, and bear in mind your parents will stop receiving Child Benefit if you switch to home education once you are past compulsory school age.

I'm all for home ed, but in your situation it seems more sensible to finish your A Levels at college.
Reply 5
Original post by PinkMobilePhone
Art will be very difficult to take at home. It's difficult enough (although not impossible) for GCSE students to take art at home, let alone for A Level.

There are many students who home educate their way through A Levels, but it's extremely expensive, and bear in mind your parents will stop receiving Child Benefit if you switch to home education once you are past compulsory school age.

I'm all for home ed, but in your situation it seems more sensible to finish your A Levels at college.

I didn't think that those expensive online learning courses were compulsory?
Reply 6
Original post by venuswbu
I didn't think that those expensive online learning courses were compulsory?

You can't take NEA without some form of established relationship with a tutor and that is expensive.
Original post by venuswbu
I didn't think that those expensive online learning courses were compulsory?

I was referring to the exam fees.
(edited 2 years ago)
I started to be homeschooled since last year and my mental health literally improved a lot. So I think if you prioritise your mental health, being home-schooled is a good choice. Make sure you have a teacher to write your reference for uni application (I’m currently struggling with finding a referee).

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