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AQA GCSE Combined Science: Trilogy - Chemistry Paper 2 (Higher) 8464/C/2H [Exam Chat]

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AQA GCSE Combined Science: Trilogy - Chemistry Paper 2 (Higher) 8464/C/2H - 20 Jun 2022 [Exam Chat]


Here is the exam discussion for this exam. Talk anything from how to revise for it, specific questions or time management :ahee:

Date/Time: Monday 20th June AM
Length: 1h15


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:goodluck: with revision and exams :work:

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feel like the 6 marker is likely to be on rate of reaction but wont be surprised if they do it on chromatography
Rates of Reaction required practical (typed up from videos, I'll do chromatography separately)

Colour change:
1. Use a measuring cylinder to put 10cm3 of sodium thiosulfate solution into a conical flask
2. Place the conical flask onto a printed black cross
3. Next, add 10cm3 of hydrochloric acid into the conical flask
4. Swirl the solution and start a stopwatch
5. Look down through the stop of the flask
6. After a certain time, the solution will turn cloudy
7. Stop the clock when we can no longer see the cross
8. Carry out the experiment again using lower concentrations of sodium thiosulfate solution
9. Repeat the whole experiment and calculate mean values for each concentration of sodium thiosulfate solution

We do not count any anomalous results when calculating the mean
---------------------------------------------------------
Volume of gas produced:
1. Use a measuring cylinder to place 50cm3 of hydrochloric acid into a conical flask
2. Attach the conical flask to a bung and delivery tube
3. Now, place the delivery tube into a container filled with water
4. Then, place an upturned measuring cylinder also filled with water over the delivery tube
5. Add a 3cm strip of magnesium to the hydrochloric acid and start a stopwatch
6. The reaction produces hydrogen gas which is trapped in the measuring cylinder
7. Every 10 seconds, measure the volume of hydrogen gas in the measuring cylinder
8. Continue until no more hydrogen is given off
9. Repeat the experiments using different concentrations of hydrochloric acid
Original post by jamest0394q
feel like the 6 marker is likely to be on rate of reaction but wont be surprised if they do it on chromatography


that is so true, but chromatography has come up in the past quite a bit
Original post by Sonia666
that is so true, but chromatography has come up in the past quite a bit


Yh then theyll probably do it on the volume of gas one
theyve done the colour change a lot
Original post by jamest0394q
Yh then theyll probably do it on the volume of gas one
theyve done the colour change a lot


yeah, guess so
revising for it is so hard tho
Original post by Sonia666
yeah, guess so
revising for it is so hard tho


Yh thats facts since the steps are so long
thats why now im revising the colour change one first
Original post by jamest0394q
Yh thats facts since the steps are so long
thats why now im revising the colour change one first


damn ur already on practicals
im trying to wrap my head around the other things first like the life assessments
Original post by Sonia666
damn ur already on practicals
im trying to wrap my head around the other things first like the life assessments


Yh I revised all of chemistry paper 2 before exams but only went back to it in the holidays so it didnt take that long to remember it all
I just need to revise the steps on greenhouse gas radiation and im not that confident on how potable water works
(edited 1 year ago)
Yh therell defo be a question on life cycle assessment (probably like a 5 or 6 marker where u have to compare something made out of wood or crude oil)
I just did a mindmap id recommend watching freesciencelessons
Original post by jamest0394q
Yh I revised all of chemistry paper 2 before exams but only went back to it in the holidays so it didnt take that long to remember it all
I just need to revise the steps on greenhouse gas radiation and im not that confident on how potable water

woah woah woah
yo ur ahead of many here
i nvr do revision that early, ill probably forget it the next day
my revision consists of like 2 days b4, but since i hv so much time to revise and i only got spanish on fri
i thought y not
dont even mention potable water, icba
Original post by jamest0394q
Yh therell defo be a question on life cycle assessment (probably like a 5 or 6 marker where u have to compare something made out of wood or crude oil)
I just did a mindmap id recommend watching freesciencelessons


hahaha freesciencelessons is the only thing im subscribed to right now
hes my new best friend
Original post by Sonia666
woah woah woah
yo ur ahead of many here
i nvr do revision that early, ill probably forget it the next day
my revision consists of like 2 days b4, but since i hv so much time to revise and i only got spanish on fri
i thought y not
dont even mention potable water, icba


šŸ¤£šŸ¤£šŸ¤£ just dont like cramming i think its helped me
then again everyone will catch up by monday so
Yh the topic is quite hard but I think im getting there, my problem was with waste water and that and how its made potable
Original post by Sonia666
hahaha freesciencelessons is the only thing im subscribed to right now
hes my new best friend


i use him sometimes his videos are useful tbf
Original post by jamest0394q
šŸ¤£šŸ¤£šŸ¤£ just dont like cramming i think its helped me
then again everyone will catch up by monday so
Yh the topic is quite hard but I think im getting there, my problem was with waste water and that and how its made potable


thats wise
but im gonna stick with last min, its the best
Chromatography:
1. Use a ruler to draw a horizontal pencil line on the chromatography paper
2. The line should be around 2cm from the bottom of the paper
3. Mark 5 pencil spots at equal spaces across the line, leaving at least 1cm clear at each side
4. Use a capillary tube to put a small spot of each known food colours and the unknown colour onto the pencil spots (a capillary tube is simply a very thin glass tube)
5. It is important we keep the spots relatively small, this prevents the colour spreading into each other later
6. Pour water into a beaker to a depth of 1cm, in this case, the water is the solvent
7. Attach the paper to a glass rod using tape and lower the paper into the beaker, the bottom of the paper should dip into the water
8. The pencil line with the spots of ink must be above the surface of the water, otherwise the water will wash the ink off the line
9. The sides of the paper must not touch the side walls of the beaker, if that happens then it will interfere with the way that the water moves. We usually put a lid on the beaker to reduce evaporation of the solvent
10. At this stage, the water will move up the paper and the colours will be carried up. During this time, we need to be careful not to move the beaker
11. Remove the paper when the water has travelled around three-quarters up
12. Use a pencil to mark the point where the water has reached
13. Hang the paper up to dry

The number of spots shows how many colours the food colours are a mixture of, for example 3 spots = mixture of 3 colours

Rf values:
Measure the distance from the pencil line to the centre of each spot to calculate the distance moved
Then measure the distance moved by the water from the pencil line
Rf = Distance moved by chemical/Distance moved by solvent (divide)
Original post by jamest0394q
i use him sometimes his videos are useful tbf


yeah extreme
Original post by hannah.06
Chromatography:
1. Use a ruler to draw a horizontal pencil line on the chromatography paper
2. The line should be around 2cm from the bottom of the paper
3. Mark 5 pencil spots at equal spaces across the line, leaving at least 1cm clear at each side
4. Use a capillary tube to put a small spot of each known food colours and the unknown colour onto the pencil spots (a capillary tube is simply a very thin glass tube)
5. It is important we keep the spots relatively small, this prevents the colour spreading into each other later
6. Pour water into a beaker to a depth of 1cm, in this case, the water is the solvent
7. Attach the paper to a glass rod using tape and lower the paper into the beaker, the bottom of the paper should dip into the water
8. The pencil line with the spots of ink must be above the surface of the water, otherwise the water will wash the ink off the line
9. The sides of the paper must not touch the side walls of the beaker, if that happens then it will interfere with the way that the water moves. We usually put a lid on the beaker to reduce evaporation of the solvent
10. At this stage, the water will move up the paper and the colours will be carried up. During this time, we need to be careful not to move the beaker
11. Remove the paper when the water has travelled around three-quarters up
12. Use a pencil to mark the point where the water has reached
13. Hang the paper up to dry

The number of spots shows how many colours the food colours are a mixture of, for example 3 spots = mixture of 3 colours

Rf values:
Measure the distance from the pencil line to the centre of each spot to calculate the distance moved
Then measure the distance moved by the water from the pencil line
Rf = Distance moved by chemical/Distance moved by solvent (divide)


Yh I think there will be a calculation to work out Rf
Original post by Sonia666
thats wise
but im gonna stick with last min, its the best


Nah thats fair enough tbf it works for some people but I dont think itd work for me id just give up

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