Mercy Killing - Right or wrong? Watch

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Sandman
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#1
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The topic of mercy killing was mentioned last night and it got me thinking.
I had the misfortune to watch my lovely grandmother die of cancer which was awful and I would have welcomed someone letting her slip away and out of pain, but my agreement is motivated by emotion.
On the other hand it concerned me that it was immoral and could possibly be misused.
Where do you stand, how do we guide medical students, and could the law ever agree to it?
Sandi
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randdom
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(Original post by Sandman)
The topic of mercy killing was mentioned last night and it got me thinking.
I had the misfortune to watch my lovely grandmother die of cancer which was awful and I would have welcomed someone letting her slip away and out of pain, but my agreement is motivated by emotion.
On the other hand it concerned me that it was immoral and could possibly be misused.
Where do you stand, how do we guide medical students, and could the law ever agree to it?
Sandi
I think that if the sick person really wants to die (when they are terminally ill anyway that they should be allowed to if they want to. I have to watch my mum suffer from MS and It is really horrible. I know that at the this moment she doesn't want to die but maybe one day she would and I think that she should be able to choose that path if that is what she wishes. Add should all people on sane mind who are terminally ill. They should be allowed to make their own choice.
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PM97
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Theologically, i know that i should consider it wrong but i also know that if someone i loved was dying and requested it i would do it...

The latest case of those poor babies in Holland is horrible though...i cant really accpet that.
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Apollo
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I think if the patient wants it, then yes. It's their body, they sould be able to chose when do die, just like they made countless other choices in their lives. If someone wants to end their life, who has the right to tell them no?
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Sam2k
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I cannot morally or ethically stand behind euthanasia. I feel that it is a sin to kill someone/let someone die. It is the same principal as suicide. Is suicide a good thing?
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NDGAARONDI
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Mercy killing and euthanasia can be two separate forms of killing. In this country, mercy killing becomes manslaughter usually.
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Apollo
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Murder: "The unlawful killing of one human by another, especially with premeditated malice" This clearly means against their will. So if they ask you to, it doesnt fit the definition of murder.
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NDGAARONDI
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Definitions change depending on the country you're in http://www.lectlaw.com/def2/m150.htm
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Sam2k
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(Original post by PadFoot90)
Murder: "The unlawful killing of one human by another, especially with premeditated malice" This clearly means against their will. So if they ask you to, it doesnt fit the definition of murder.
Actually, it does still constitute murder. Them asking you to do it doesn't make it lawful. If it did, everyone on trial for murder would just say that they were asked to shoot the guy, or asked to violently chop the person up.
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pedy1986
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(Original post by Moncal)
Actually, it does still constitute murder. Them asking you to do it doesn't make it lawful. If it did, everyone on trial for murder would just say that they were asked to shoot the guy, or asked to violently chop the person up.
That's the most silly statement I have ever heard. If mercy killing was legalised it would obviously be done in a controlled environment, not when you feel like it at home!

Besides, despite the law lords ruling on euthanasia in the Diane Pretty case I would still argue that it should be lawful. The way I see freedom is on the basis that we should be free to do anything that is an action regarding only the individual alone or that with other consenting individuals. In my view euthanasia clearly is a self-regarding action and the other-regarding aspect (i.e. the person who gives them the drugs to die etc) has the consent of the individual.

The only grounds I can see against euthanisia are definetly not in the principle of it (indeed those who in principle are against it in my view are illiberal and thus I'll never agree) but the practicality of it to ensure no abuse requires a iron clad system - but is it possible to have an iron clad system? I don't know.
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technik
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yes but with 2 doctors approval.
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Sam2k
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(Original post by corey)
That's the most silly statement I have ever heard. If mercy killing was legalised it would obviously be done in a controlled environment, not when you feel like it at home!
Please read context. Padfoot defined murder and said that if someone requests to be killed it isn't murder. I repsonded that that is not true. There was no reference to whether or not euthanasia would be done in a controlled environment.

But what is a controlled environment? Do you mean a hospital room? ICU? Or would the doctors have to take the patient to a special room?
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rainjan_4now
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(Original post by Sandman)
The topic of mercy killing was mentioned last night and it got me thinking.
I had the misfortune to watch my lovely grandmother die of cancer which was awful and I would have welcomed someone letting her slip away and out of pain, but my agreement is motivated by emotion.
On the other hand it concerned me that it was immoral and could possibly be misused.
Where do you stand, how do we guide medical students, and could the law ever agree to it?
Sandi
i am not necessarily a person who backs euthanasia, but my grandma also recently died from terminal cancer, and about 3 weeks b4 she died i thought she was about to die there and then (out of breath, coughing, etc), not knowing that she would wake up the next morning feeling much better than the previous day.

If i was to contemplate putting her out of her misery the night b4, i would have felt very guilty the next day. So i think that sometimes it's best to leave your thoughts in your head, and take a chance with fate.
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randdom
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(Original post by PM97)
Theologically, i know that i should consider it wrong but i also know that if someone i loved was dying and requested it i would do it...

The latest case of those poor babies in Holland is horrible though...i cant really accpet that.
What is this about babies in holland?
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Ziggy Stardust
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I am pro-euthanasia. obviously, it would be so horrible for anybody to ever have to deal with a real-life situation like this, but it does happen.

I think if a person requests to die (through terminal illness or what not), they should always be analysed to confirm that they are able to think straight or not (I know this is a hard process, and not always accurate). The person should also be made fully aware of what is in store for them, i.e. no going back, are you sure this is your wish? etc...

If somebody is really suffering that badly, and they feel it is best for them, and those around them if their suffering ended, then it should be allowed. But it would also be very important for the laws to not become casual, so that not just anybody can choose this path.. You'd firstly need to be checked, informed etc.
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randdom
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(Original post by afireinside©)
I am pro-euthanasia. obviously, it would be so horrible for anybody to ever have to deal with a real-life situation like this, but it does happen.

I think if a person requests to die (through terminal illness or what not), they should always be analysed to confirm that they are able to think straight or not (I know this is a hard process, and not always accurate). The person should also be made fully aware of what is in store for them, i.e. no going back, are you sure this is your wish? etc...

If somebody is really suffering that badly, and they feel it is best for them, and those around them if their suffering ended, then it should be allowed. But it would also be very important for the laws to not become casual, so that not just anybody can choose this path.. You'd firstly need to be checked, informed etc.
I agree completely (see first reply for reasons)
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Ziggy Stardust
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(Original post by randdom)
I agree completely (see first reply for reasons)

I am also sorry to hear about your mum going through so much pain
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