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Toni Mag
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Here's what (i think) i know: SAT1 is compulsory for all US unis; SAT2 is for some (e.g. Harvard) but not all.
Here's what (i know) i don't know: For US entry in 2006 (a friend),
When do you take these SAT1 and SAT2s?
What is the 'new SAT1'?
What role does the A level play then?
How much would it cost - roughly - to attend e.g. Yale?

thanks
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CamSPSer
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surely this shouldnt be in the oxbridge board?
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Toni Mag
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(Original post by notyourpunk)
surely this shouldnt be in the oxbridge board?
(surely?) I thought that those who had applied to Oxbridge would also be the ones that would know about such things. doh!
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naelse
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yeah maybe the ppl in general university would know... but try www.studyusa.com
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phishfood
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i gave up the idea of college in the States quite early on, so some of this might be inaccurate.

You take SATs whenever you want, there are exam sessions throughout the year. Application deadlines are December before entry, so get SATs done by November. Leave time for any retakes as well.

The new SAT is just a reshffule of the old. It scraps two sections called Analogies and and Quantitative Comparisons, shortens comprehension passages, but adds an essay.

A levels are important in your reference as evidence of academic performance, but won't figure in any offer which will be unconditional.

Costs will vary, so big-city Columbia will cost more than small-town Dartmouth. Tuition fees are up to £30,000 pa, add up to $15,000 living costs and flights etc.
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Drogue
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(Original post by Toni Mag)
SAT1 is compulsory for all US unis; SAT2 is for some (e.g. Harvard) but not all.
Almost any decent college, ie. one work going over to the US for, will ask for SATIIs for US students, but many accept A levels instead of SATIIs, though the SATI is still compulsory.

(Original post by Toni Mag)
When do you take these SAT1 and SAT2s?
All the time over the year, even in junior year if you want. Take it as many times as you want, too.

(Original post by Toni Mag)
What is the 'new SAT1'?
As said before, a 3 part SAT out of 2400, rather than the old 2 part math and verbal one, our of 1600.

(Original post by Toni Mag)
What role does the A level play then?
Very little, though is looked on as another thing you're doing. It is possible to get college credits for them, because we start uni a year later, but not always possible.

(Original post by Toni Mag)
How much would it cost - roughly - to attend e.g. Yale?
IIRC, about $45,000 per year in total, excluding any financial support. Fees are just under $30,000, and around $15,000 in living costs. Most colleges give a financial breakdown on their website. Harvard's is slightly higher, most are lower than Yale's though.
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Toni Mag
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THANK YOU Drogue; THANK YOU Phishfood
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tomcoolinguk
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(Original post by phishfood)
Costs will vary, so big-city Columbia will cost more than small-town Dartmouth. Tuition fees are up to £30,000 pa, add up to $15,000 living costs and flights etc.
This is rather presumptious, and indeed innacurate. Dartmouth is one of the most expensive places in America to be a student because of the significance of the wealth the University brings to the town.

No American cities will cost as much as London though, but you have to watch out- accomodation is much more expensive.

Realistically, you have to be exceptional to get into an Ivy League college- contrary to the opinions of many on this forum, they ARE incredibly competitive, and HYP are more competitive than Oxbridge. There are no easy courses to get onto at Harvard. Last year they rejected over 5000 people with a 4.0 gpa AT EVERY EDUCATIONAL STAGE and 800 in all 5 SAT exams [SAT I, II, 3X SAT II]. This competition continues when you get there, as you then have to apply for various courses. If you are thinking of concentrating in English Lit or Psychology or Economics- be careful, as I have spoken to people who have gone to these colleges and simply not got onto courses in these subjects.
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sixthirtythree
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(Original post by tomcoolinguk)
Last year they rejected over 5000 people with a 4.0 gpa AT EVERY EDUCATIONAL STAGE and 800 in all 5 SAT exams [SAT I, II, 3X SAT II].
Sweetling, only 900 people got 1600 in SAT I last year, out of the 1.5 million that took it. Apparently, if you get 1600 in SAT I, your chances of getting in go up to about 30% (woo hoo! this stat is for Harvard). It also helps muchly if you're a legacy (mummy/daddy, or even grandparents, went to the college) - acceptance rate then increases to about 40%.
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tomcoolinguk
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(Original post by deianra)
Sweetling, only 900 people got 1600 in SAT I last year, out of the 1.5 million that took it. Apparently, if you get 1600 in SAT I, your chances of getting in go up to about 30% (woo hoo! this stat is for Harvard). It also helps muchly if you're a legacy (mummy/daddy, or even grandparents, went to the college) - acceptance rate then increases to about 40%.
Are you sure? I was told that 3million took it, and that 1 in 700 got 1600- this is why you can't trust bitter rejectees!!!! But the family stat is definitely true- at Yale if you have 3 alumni connections [sibling or parents sibling, parent, grandparent] the increase in acceptance is to something like 74%.

I apologise for the innacuracies in my post.
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JUSTaGIRL
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Also worth thinking about are the Seven Sister colleges (Smith, Mount Hollyoke, Bryn Mawr, etc) which are said to be the 'female equivalents' of the Ivy League. They are really top notch (primarily undergraduate) colleges for women well worth looking into if you are a girl.
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Toni Mag
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(Original post by tomcoolinguk)
Are you sure? I was told that 3million took it, and that 1 in 700 got 1600- this is why you can't trust bitter rejectees!!!! But the family stat is definitely true- at Yale if you have 3 alumni connections [sibling or parents sibling, parent, grandparent] the increase in acceptance is to something like 74%.

I apologise for the innacuracies in my post.

No, Tomcooling, don't be silly. This is huge info and a good insight irrespective of actual numbers. Thanks Deiandra too.
it's all kinds frightening, not least it's unknown / foreign / unfamiliar.
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NMiller5a
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Unless your family is fabulously wealthy, or you're willing to take on a huge amount of debt, I really wouldn't reccommend going to an American school. All of them are ridiculously expensive for both foreigners and Americans alike. I think it's even harder for foreigners because they're unlikely to get many scholarships for undergraduate degrees and I'm not sure whether or not Britain offers the same type of low-interest loans like the American government does in the US (of course, there is much less of a need for that type of thing in the UK than here.)

All the Ivy Leagues here worth going to are as competitive as Oxford or Cambridge and at about the same level of quality, except perhaps with half the scenic beauty and ten times the expense of those two schools. One of the reasons why I'm going to the UK for university is because its far cheaper than going to a decent one here.

This whole thing about Yale only accepting 800's in 5 SATs is ludicrous. Firstly affirmative action and legacy programmes allow people in with far lower standards and even without those most people still manage to get in without getting a single 800.
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phishfood
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(Original post by NMiller5a)
Unless your family is fabulously wealthy, or you're willing to take on a huge amount of debt, I really wouldn't reccommend going to an American school. All of them are ridiculously expensive for both foreigners and Americans alike. I think it's even harder for foreigners because they're unlikely to get many scholarships for undergraduate degrees and I'm not sure whether or not Britain offers the same type of low-interest loans like the American government does in the US (of course, there is much less of a need for that type of thing in the UK than here.)

All the Ivy Leagues here worth going to are as competitive as Oxford or Cambridge and at about the same level of quality, except perhaps with half the scenic beauty and ten times the expense of those two schools. One of the reasons why I'm going to the UK for university is because its far cheaper than going to a decent one here.

This whole thing about Yale only accepting 800's in 5 SATs is ludicrous. Firstly affirmative action and legacy programmes allow people in with far lower standards and even without those most people still manage to get in without getting a single 800.
i agree. and SAT scores are not the be all and end all either - they do look beyond those, especially for foreign applicants.

also, applicants from the UK tend to overlook undergraduate-only colleges like Amherst in favour of big-name, research centres like Harvard. if you really like the Liberal Arts programmes over in the States, it's worth thinking about colleges which devote all their resources to their undergrad students
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Fredricks
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I agree with Phishfood, there are many more factors to getting into an ivy league school than having great SATs. They take extra curricular activities very seriously i believe. One guy in our school got 1600 on his SAT's but with no extra curricular activities at all he didnt get into Harvard.
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(Original post by Drogue)
(Original post by ToniMag)
When do you take these SAT1 and SAT2s?
All the time over the year, even in junior year if you want. Take it as many times as you want, too.
I wouldn't recommend taking it more than twice. The universities can see how many times you take it, and doing it repeatedly doesn't give a good impression.

(Original post by Drogue)
(Original post by ToniMag)
What role does the A level play then?
Very little, though is looked on as another thing you're doing. It is possible to get college credits for them, because we start uni a year later, but not always possible.
I would disagree. I believe the British education system is what makes applicants from the UK so appealing to unis in the US.

As part of your application, they demand a transcript listing all of your courses (with grades you achieved). They look at A Levels and GCSEs carefully, and also work out your GPA using these grades.
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anchemis
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SAT I (Old) consists of two sections: Verbal and Maths

SAT II Subjects Tests allow you to choose upto 3 subjects per test date to display your 'academic ability' in those subjects

New SAT I consists of the old SAT (with analogies removed) + parts from the SAT II Writing Test.... so it consists of 3 sections... Verbal, Writing and Maths...

Most US Unis need SAT I (for 2006 entry, the new SAT)
Competitive unis need 3 SAT II subjects... usually in the areas:
ENGLISH: Writing OR LITERATURE (depends on uni)
MATHS: Level I OR Level II (Level 2 is only for the very compeitive ones)
Any Other Subject: for science students... they expect a science subject (Chemistry, Physics, Molecular Biology or Ecological Biology)... for Arts/Langauage Student they expect Arts/Language subjects (World History, American History, Languages) NOTE: LANGUAGE TEST ARE ONLY HELD IN NOVEMBER.... BOOKING DEADLINE IS ALWAYS EARLY OCTOBER...

It is better to check on each unis website to check the requirements

for more info on the SAT programme visit... www.collegeboard.com

NOTE: A-LEVELS ARE NOT ACCEPTED AT MOST UNIS...
Some unis allow A FULL COURSE (6 module) A-Level to substitute for SAT II subjects tests... so A-Level Chem for SAT II Chem and so on.... but SAT I is still compulsory and non-substitutable unless you are an American Student Taking ACTs...

Other Unis allow you to gain Course Credit Hours... (In US... to graduate you need to obtain so and so Credit hours... normally around 400)... so you may graduate ealier
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anchemis
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ABOUT FINANCES... Typical PRIVATE American university costs about $40000 per year... (20000 pounds...) maybe more as it EXCLUDE TRAVEL COSTS...

The top unis... err... Harvard, Princeton, MIT, Yale... have NEED-BLIND Admissions for international students.... and may give financial aid on NEED basis... they work out your family income... you need to fill in a long financial form... and they work out how much you need to contribute...

NOT ALL UNIS HAVE FINANCIAL AID... so CHECK THEIR SITE
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Amystrangeglove
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God it is sooooo complicated i am staying in good ol' Britain!
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The Messiah
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#20
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SAT's are easier than common entrance, i took them last year... u just need a wide vocab..
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