The Student Room Group

Using Access to HE: Science to get onto Radiography

Hi everyone. I'm wondering if anyone has had experience on an Access to Higher Education Science course? My first degree was an Arts degree and I've been out of education for so long now I have to do an Access to HE Course for the Uni Degree. I'm really worried about not being able to get the distinctions I need and the exams that are on the course. Is anyone willing to share their experience on the Science course or any Healthcare access course please?

EDIT:
Would Health Professional be a good alternative to Science? Some universities only want 15 credits in one of the following subjects: Biology/ Human Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Maths.
I would love to hear everyone's opinions and experiences. Thank you!
(edited 2 years ago)
Hi
I did Access to Science in 2020/21 and I was 44 when I started, so a long time out of education for me! It wasn't easy, especially as a lot was remote due to restrictions, but I managed to get all distinctions (45 credits) and then there's the 15 at pass. I'm now at King's college London studying nutrition science. I've almost completed year 1 and I'm really enjoying it.

I would say that Access is quite demanding time-wise as its all in one academic year. The assignments were reasonably spread out during the year, but it did get a bit intense in the last couple of months. If you read the criteria for each assignment/exam and make sure you cover all of them, then you will pass. To get the merit/distinction level marks, you need to read extra material from reliable sources and be able to reference that in your work.
Also really read the assignment question and, it sounds obvious, but answer the question! It's so easy to ramble off on a tangent and realise you didn't actually give the answer to what was asked. If the question says compare, then make sure you give comparisons, if it says discuss etc. My tutors were quite hot on pointing that out to us.

My Access course covered biology, chemistry, physics and statistics. I had to get distinctions in chemistry and biology to get into my top choice uni, but the things I learned in physics and statistics have also been really useful.

Good luck with whatever you choose to do and ask if you have any questions. I don't check on here that often, but I'll reply if I see it.
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by joanneg76
Hi
I did Access to Science in 2020/21 and I was 44 when I started, so a long time out of education for me! It wasn't easy, especially as a lot was remote due to restrictions, but I managed to get all distinctions (45 credits) and then there's the 15 at pass. I'm now at King's college London studying nutrition science. I've almost completed year 1 and I'm really enjoying it.

I would say that Access is quite demanding time-wise as its all in one academic year. The assignments were reasonably spread out during the year, but it did get a bit intense in the last couple of months. If you read the criteria for each assignment/exam and make sure you cover all of them, then you will pass. To get the merit/distinction level marks, you need to read extra material from reliable sources and be able to reference that in your work.
Also really read the assignment question and, it sounds obvious, but answer the question! It's so easy to ramble off on a tangent and realise you didn't actually give the answer to what was asked. If the question says compare, then make sure you give comparisons, if it says discuss etc. My tutors were quite hot on pointing that out to us.

My Access course covered biology, chemistry, physics and statistics. I had to get distinctions in chemistry and biology to get into my top choice uni, but the things I learned in physics and statistics have also been really useful.

Good luck with whatever you choose to do and ask if you have any questions. I don't check on here that often, but I'll reply if I see it.

Thank you so much for your reply! This has helped to clear up some of my questions.
My only fear is the exams as I tend to get very anxious. How many exams did you have? Was it one for each module?
We had a total of 3 exams on my course. 2 for chemistry and 1 for anatomy & physiology. There should have been another for physics, but because of lockdowns, they turned it into an assignment (which I was so happy about!)
The first chemistry exam was fairly early on and was about basics, so it was quite easy. The other exams were harder but they were both open book. For A&P we could bring along the recommended textbook, and for chemistry we were allowed one A4 sheet of notes printed on both sides, so it wasn’t like we had to memorise absolutely everything.
I know how you feel about exams, I hate them! I’ve got my end of year exams starting next week and I have 7 in total. I feel as though I’m constantly revising!

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