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shenzys
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#1
Report Thread starter 11 years ago
#1
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CatexW
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#2
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#2
Yes...
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xxunique99xx
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#3
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the bases are the same.... DNA is composed of a nucleotide base, phosphate group and sugar..... but DNA is different for everyone because there are infinite combinations ... =)
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Rubix
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#4
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The essential constituents of DNA are always the same, and then theres RNA which has a ribose sugar group instead of deoxy ribose and uracil instead of thymine.

..then you have the various types of RNA.
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fastpalladium
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#5
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DNA can exist in three different forms - A, B and Z, if that's what you're asking
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.SK.
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#6
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I don't really understand what you mean by one kind of DNA, unless you are meaning to be extremely general?

Genetic codes on earth are composed of either DNA or RNA.

RNA is utilised by most prokaryotes, including many viruses, and is used (comparatively) sparingly by eukaryotes, including humans. The human genome is composed entirely of DNA, with RNA being used in replication, transcription and translation, but not as the actual first principle coding sequence.

DNA stands for deoxyribonucleic acid, and everyone's will have a different structure.

There is only one "kind" of DNA in that all DNA shares a common structure. Diffuse chromatin will condense during the S - stage of a cell cycle to give the Watson - Crick double helical structure that is commonly seen. Each strand is made up of nuclotides; each nucleotide is comprised of a sugar which has bound to it a phosphate group (or 3 in the free state) and a nitrogenous base. These are adenosine, thymine, guanine and cytosine.

So yes, there is only one kind of DNA, but everybody's DNA has a different sequence of these nitrogenous base pairs. If coding, these sequences will eventually translate to different proteins (with sub-units of differing linear amino acid arrangement): if non-coding, the sequence may be reglulatory, and influence gene expression when bound to promotors/inhibitors.
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Houstonian
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#7
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There is only one kind of DNA on earth. All life on earth shares the same DNA blueprint; from bacteria to a blue whale and everything in-between. The only difference is the sequence of ACTG (ACGU for RNA). This is a major source of contention. Life began on earth as soon as it was possible for life to form. If it was so easy for environmental conditions to evolve DNA/RNA, they why did it only happen once, and why has it never happened again? The only commonly accepted scientific theory I am aware of (as far as atheists are concerned) is that life was "deposited" here on earth from another planet (possibly Mars) during a geological period of time where life existed on that planet. If you believe that life was created here on earth, then you have your answer.
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