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Automotive engineering or mechanical engineering

Hi I’m stuck between automotive engineering and mechanical engineering. If I study automotive engineering I’m afraid that years down the line it’ll be very limited to combustion engines and stuff due to the fact of electric vehicles coming in but with mechanical I’ll have more access to a wide spread of choice within engineering
Original post by junior23040
Hi I’m stuck between automotive engineering and mechanical engineering. If I study automotive engineering I’m afraid that years down the line it’ll be very limited to combustion engines and stuff due to the fact of electric vehicles coming in but with mechanical I’ll have more access to a wide spread of choice within engineering

Brookes Automotive degree includes electric vehicles: https://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/undergraduate/automotive-engineering

There is a lot of overlap with Mech Eng - compare the modules.
Reply 2
Original post by Muttley79
Brookes Automotive degree includes electric vehicles: https://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/undergraduate/automotive-engineering

There is a lot of overlap with Mech Eng - compare the modules.



Thank you, only thing is I only get 48 ucas points and I have 4 conditional offers
Original post by junior23040
Thank you, only thing is I only get 48 ucas points and I have 4 conditional offers

Foundation year?
Reply 4
Original post by Muttley79
Foundation year?

Yes
Original post by junior23040
Yes

Where are your offers from?
Reply 6
Original post by Muttley79
Where are your offers from?

Wolverhampton
Bedfordshire
Blackpool
Bolton
But I’m stuck between Wolverhampton and Bedfordshire
id pick wolverhampton much better
Doing mechanical isn’t an issue, no one in the automotive industry really differentiates between the two. You won’t be learning the detailed subsystem technologies on anything more then a high level overview, the degree will focus on the underpinning physics & mathematics. Automotive degree probably isn’t as limiting as you think it is, but id say mechanical links more implicitly with other sectors like aerospace/energy etc. but their is really nothing stopping you from applying to those industries especially as a graduate.

On EVs your never going to learn in the depth needed to be an expert electrified powertrain engineer at university, if you are really interested in the electro-mechanical relationship I would suggest do a mechanical & electrical engineering degree (where the electrical focus is on power electronics, although the problem is very few of these courses exist). Although ev’s have plenty of mechanical issues, think about the temperatures in batteries & the mechanical output of motors.
(edited 2 years ago)
Thank you v

Original post by mnot
Doing mechanical isn’t an issue, no one in the automotive industry really differentiates between the two. You won’t be learning the detailed subsystem technologies on anything more then a high level overview, the degree will focus on the underpinning physics & mathematics. Automotive degree probably isn’t as limiting as you think it is, but id say mechanical links more implicitly with other sectors like aerospace/energy etc. but their is really nothing stopping you from applying to those industries especially as a graduate.

On EVs your never going to learn in the depth needed to be an expert electrified powertrain engineer at university, if you are really interested in the electro-mechanical relationship I would suggest do a mechanical & electrical engineering degree (where the electrical focus is on power electronics, although the problem is very few of these courses exist). Although ev’s have plenty of mechanical issues, think about the temperatures in batteries & the mechanical output of motors.


Thank you very much for your help

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