The Student Room Group

How can we keep our energy bills down in the increase?

I had my last bill which is now paid but now with the increase, how can I keep them down?

One thing is that there are devices that use phantom energy and will need to know these that do.

Any tips?
well you're kind of screwed before you start because the standing charge has been massively increased so that the surviving energy companies can claw back the costs of picking up the customers from all the too-good-to-be-true energy companies that collapsed.

you can go around switching off at the plug (or unplugging) mobile phone chargers etc but IMO it doesn't really make an awful lot of difference to your bills... but switching the heating off and wearing a jumper / fleece indoors does.
you can also make sure you're not running the washing machine with tiny loads, line dry outdoors (now that we're getting some nice weather) instead of tumble drying and have the fridge running efficiently by deicing it (if possible)
By posting threads in the correct forum
Original post by CoolCavy
By posting threads in the correct forum

allegra.png
Original post by the bear
allegra.png

That picture used one joule of energy for me to load :colonhash:
Original post by CoolCavy
That picture used one joule of energy for me to load :colonhash:

but it warmed you up tho'

:teehee:
In all seriousness I don't think there is much you can do, this cap release has made everything soar. Even if you are saving a few pounds on energy you are still absorbing it in food, transport and everything else costs
I think if you're trying to detect whether something is drawing power an EMF meter / detector would tell you, but Im not sure if it would be worth the investment as they're like £30. Also I'm not 100% sure on this - someone correct me if I'm wrong?
This method requires a small amount of physical labour and has one or two safety considerations.
You must first tunnel into your neighbours house - ideally into the room in which they have their electricity meter - this may be easier or harder depending on the layout of your two houses.
Next, you run some wires back from the meter to your house and put them in place bypassing your meter. Make sure to wear thick gloves when doing this as you can't turn the electricity off or your neighbour would notice when their power cut out.
Finally, you relax and never pay another penny for electricity.
Original post by CurlyyMM
I think if you're trying to detect whether something is drawing power an EMF meter / detector would tell you, but Im not sure if it would be worth the investment as they're like £30. Also I'm not 100% sure on this - someone correct me if I'm wrong?

I got a plug in one that goes between the socket and the applince for about a tenner a few years ago.

Trouble is its not very straightforward to interpret them. A lot of appliances vary in power a lot while theyre in use and some people get carried away witb the idea that their washing machine is costing them £1000 per year cos it has a high power peak while its heating up water for a couple of minutes.

Those electric sockets with built in usb charging ports are a bit annoying anyway and theres nothing you can do about it apart from replacing the top. Wired in smoke alarms and suchlike you're probably stuck with.
I guesstimate maybe £1 per week (£52 per year) is a realistic amount of vampire power, it isn't nothing but OTOH its still only £1 per week

Martin Lewis (money saving expert) was on the radio a couple of days ago talking about vampire power...

He thinks the £147 per house annual figure being promoted by some large energy suppliers is a bit of a worst case/myth based on old tellys etc.

and commented that it's in the interest of the large energy suppliers to try and shift some of the responsibility for high bills on to the consumer.

Presumably the government will be thinking about windfall taxing energy suppliers at some point and the energy suppliers would like to be able to point at the advice on reducing power use they gave to customers.

The same radio show also had a social media lady called (I think) Miss Pennypincher who was talking about how she used smartplugs and Alexa to switch off the lights when she went out...

The problem with this is that Alexa and the smartplugs apart from having quite a high purchase price are all also power vampires in their own right. Amazon echo is a 3 Watt vampire and the smartplugs are about 1W each as far as I'm able to make out. Modern LED lightbulbs are probably between 3 and 6 Watts (olden days tungsten lightbulbs were 60 to 100W each) - The thing with the high efficiency stuff we've got these days is that you don't save much money by switching it off.
And of course you can make energetic pets earn their keep

Original post by JVM2020
I had my last bill which is now paid but now with the increase, how can I keep them down?

One thing is that there are devices that use phantom energy and will need to know these that do.

Any tips?

Ask your energy company to install a smart meter - it should be done free of charge. If you rent, ask your landlord for permission to do so.
Original post by JVM2020
I had my last bill which is now paid but now with the increase, how can I keep them down?

One thing is that there are devices that use phantom energy and will need to know these that do.

Any tips?

If you leave it switched on, it's using energy. Some things will use more than others, but there's no such thing as a magic device that's turned on but not using any power. It's just the same energy as anything else, nothing "phantom" about it.

In the end the only way you save money is by using less power. Turn off things you're not using. Use things you run regularly less - don't run your dishwasher or washing machine half-empty, the world really will not end if you put your shirts and towels in the same wash. Hang your washing out to dry instead of using a tumble dryer. Turn the heating down a bit and put a sweater on instead of sitting there in your T shirt. Turn it off altogether in rooms you don't need to keep warm and shut doors to keep heat where it's useful. Put an extra blanket on your bed and turn the heating off at night. If you're out at work during the day, turn the heating off during the day.
Reply 14
Original post by skylark2
If you leave it switched on, it's using energy. Some things will use more than others, but there's no such thing as a magic device that's turned on but not using any power. It's just the same energy as anything else, nothing "phantom" about it.

In the end the only way you save money is by using less power. Turn off things you're not using. Use things you run regularly less - don't run your dishwasher or washing machine half-empty, the world really will not end if you put your shirts and towels in the same wash. Hang your washing out to dry instead of using a tumble dryer. Turn the heating down a bit and put a sweater on instead of sitting there in your T shirt. Turn it off altogether in rooms you don't need to keep warm and shut doors to keep heat where it's useful. Put an extra blanket on your bed and turn the heating off at night. If you're out at work during the day, turn the heating off during the day.


Turning WiFi off at night is also useful. I turn everything off at night.
Original post by normaw
Ask your energy company to install a smart meter - it should be done free of charge. If you rent, ask your landlord for permission to do so.


Note that smart meters, by themselves, do not save energy.

Any energy savings come from changes in behaviour -- which smart meters help with by highligting usage and cost.
Reply 16
Original post by martin7
Note that smart meters, by themselves, do not save energy.

Any energy savings come from changes in behaviour -- which smart meters help with by highligting usage and cost.

I already have a smart meter installed.

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