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biology - phenotype

I know that phenotype is an observable trait - if so, does it mean that for example cell-sickle disease is not considered as phenotype?
Or is phenotype simply means the expression of genotype

any help would be appreciated thanks :smile:
"Observable" does not have to mean the literal "you can see this with your eyes as the person stands in front of you" in the same way that height and eye colour would. Indeed, cells have their own phenotype which is dependent upon the genes expressed within the cell.

In the case of sickle-cell disease, the complications that arise from this (Ie- sickle-shaped red blood cells) would be the phenotype and the genotype would be the genetic mutation responsible for the disease. (:
Original post by bunbunbun
"Observable" does not have to mean the literal "you can see this with your eyes as the person stands in front of you" in the same way that height and eye colour would. Indeed, cells have their own phenotype which is dependent upon the genes expressed within the cell.

In the case of sickle-cell disease, the complications that arise from this (Ie- sickle-shaped red blood cells) would be the phenotype and the genotype would be the genetic mutation responsible for the disease. (:

ohhh ok, thank you so much now I get it
Original post by bunbunbun
"Observable" does not have to mean the literal "you can see this with your eyes as the person stands in front of you" in the same way that height and eye colour would. Indeed, cells have their own phenotype which is dependent upon the genes expressed within the cell.

In the case of sickle-cell disease, the complications that arise from this (Ie- sickle-shaped red blood cells) would be the phenotype and the genotype would be the genetic mutation responsible for the disease. (:

can I also ask what humus and organic material are?
Original post by BrightBlueStar11
can I also ask what humus and organic material are?

Organic material is found in nature, naturally. Examples are leaves, animals, grass cuttings, wood, and manure. A good way to think of it would be if it's living or came from a living thing then it's an organic material. For example, rocks would not be an organic material because they are neither living nor from a living thing. Similar inorganic materials would be air and water.

Humus is a form of soil that is made from dead plants, leaves, and animals. It's formed by these organic materials decomposing and being broken down by the life forms living in soil (like worms and bacteria). It comprises the top few inches of soil, typically, and has a lot of nutritious material that plants use to grow.

I hope that helps you! (:

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