Why do you think Hardy named his novel ‘Tess of the d'Urbervilles’?

Watch this thread
meli77
Badges: 15
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 3 months ago
#1
^^^
0
reply
GeminiReads11
Badges: 7
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 3 months ago
#2
- the novel is about the life of one person so it makes sense to be a name
- around this time (late Victorian) it was very popular to write novels about the life of one eponymous protagonist from their birth to death (bildungsroman) e.g. Oliver Twist, Anna Karenina, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Madame Bovary
- it's primarily concerned with the events of Tess' life (hence it uses her name)
- the use of her surname is significant as it relates to her familial/marital relationships
- she is mostly known as Durbeyfield, so using D'Urbervilles raises questions about her true identity and status, as well as hinting that her association with the D'Ubervilles over the course of the novel is very significant
- D'Urberville is not only the name of her relatives/ancestors, but also symbolises the 19th century obsession with lineage and heritage, good breeding, old blood etc.
- the use of her maiden name avoids spoiling the plot, but also highlights the expectations of virginity and chastity for Victorian women
- you can contrast this with similar novels; in Tess of the D'Urbervilles (using maiden name), the novel describes Tess' life both before and after and besides her relationships with men, whilst Madame Bovary is largely about Emma's life after marriage, as is Anna Karenina (which both use the protagonists' married surnames in the title)
1
reply
meli77
Badges: 15
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report Thread starter 3 months ago
#3
(Original post by GeminiReads11)
- the novel is about the life of one person so it makes sense to be a name
- around this time (late Victorian) it was very popular to write novels about the life of one eponymous protagonist from their birth to death (bildungsroman) e.g. Oliver Twist, Anna Karenina, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Madame Bovary
- it's primarily concerned with the events of Tess' life (hence it uses her name)
- the use of her surname is significant as it relates to her familial/marital relationships
- she is mostly known as Durbeyfield, so using D'Urbervilles raises questions about her true identity and status, as well as hinting that her association with the D'Ubervilles over the course of the novel is very significant
- D'Urberville is not only the name of her relatives/ancestors, but also symbolises the 19th century obsession with lineage and heritage, good breeding, old blood etc.
- the use of her maiden name avoids spoiling the plot, but also highlights the expectations of virginity and chastity for Victorian women
- you can contrast this with similar novels; in Tess of the D'Urbervilles (using maiden name), the novel describes Tess' life both before and after and besides her relationships with men, whilst Madame Bovary is largely about Emma's life after marriage, as is Anna Karenina (which both use the protagonists' married surnames in the title)
this is so helpful. many thanks!
0
reply
GeminiReads11
Badges: 7
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#4
Report 3 months ago
#4
(Original post by meli77)
this is so helpful. many thanks!
no worries
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest

How are you feeling about your results?

They're better than I expected (90)
42.65%
They're exactly what I expected (49)
23.22%
They're lower than I expected (72)
34.12%

Watched Threads

View All