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Christophicus
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#1
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#1
How many dimensions and states of matter do you think there are?
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elpaw
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#2
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#2
matters of state?
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Christophicus
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#3
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#3
(Original post by elpaw)
matters of state?
yes solid, liquid, gas but do you consider plasma as a state?
Forget it, just answer 1st question.
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elpaw
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#4
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#4
states of matter :p:

matters of state sounds like a tom clancy novel
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nas7232
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#5
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#5
3

i wouldn't consider plasma as a 4th state
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dvs
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#6
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#6
11 dimensions (although I have no problem with 3 ) & 5 states of matter.
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john !!
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#7
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#7
I think more than 3 (excluding time)
but who knows
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thefish_uk
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#8
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#8
(Original post by dvs)
11 dimensions (although I have no problem with 3 ) & 5 states of matter.
Yeah I thought it was 10 or 11...

As for states of matter there's 6!
Solid
Liquid
Gas
Plasma
Bose-Einstein codensate
Fermionic condensate

The first 4 are common... yup, plasma is what flames are made of, apparently.
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Feria
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#9
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#9
At least 11 dimentions...
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hitchhiker_13
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#10
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#10
(Original post by thefish_uk)
Yeah I thought it was 10 or 11...

As for states of matter there's 6!
Solid
Liquid
Gas
Plasma
Bose-Einstein codensate
Fermionic condensate

The first 4 are common... yup, plasma is what flames are made of, apparently.
don't you get supersolids and superliquids as well?
Maybe they don't count as extra states.
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dvs
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#11
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(Original post by thefish_uk)
Yeah I thought it was 10 or 11...
Yup, according to M-Theory.

I haven't heard about Fermionic condensate; I'll be sure to look it up.
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El Stevo
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#12
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#12
i thought flames were incandescent carbon...
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elpaw
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#13
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(Original post by El Stevo)
i thought flames were incandescent carbon...
there's enough energy released in the fire too ionise the gas.
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material breach
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#14
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Why do so many people believe there are so many dimensions? We (seeming as all the people that have said it are doing no higher level than a level) don't understand the maths to believe there are more than 3 dimensions and have no experience of any more than 3 so to say there are more than 11 seems a little foolish IMO. I wouldnt be proud of myself for accepting something I didnt have any understanding of. Its all very unscientific.
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idiopathic
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#15
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#15
So fires are plasma - but why is plasma not just gas (albeit ionised)?
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belu_bustu
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#16
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#16
Listen up...

Solid, liquid, gas, and plasma are the 4 traditional states of matter. This is the case beacause all matter can be clearly grouped into any of these 4 categories.

However matter comprised of bosonic particles (e.g. composite boson atoms) can undergo a transition where all the particles "condense" into their lowest possible quantum state - the ground state. In 1997, an ideal Bose-Einstein condensate was achieved for actual atoms. BECs form when the de Broglie wavelengths of atoms overlap, forming an effective giant "matter-wave". And finally there are the more spurious "superfluids". These have best been described as partially Bose-condensed... However their mechanics are incredibly complicated, and have been subject to extensive research for many decades.

Lastly, the so-called Fermionic Condensate is not quite so obviously delineated. Electrons - which are fermions and not bosons - are known to undergo a transition to superconductivity at low temperatures, where effectively they behave as Bosons which have Bose-Einstein-condensed into their state of least electrical resistance. This is because the electrons can form bosonic pairs called cooper pairs by lattice interactions within the metal - a phenomenon described by Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory (BCS Theory). The Fermionic condensate (very recently achieved) is a sort of matter equivalent to the BCS effect in superconducting metals. It occurs when a gas of fermions, under very specific conditions, are forced to form cooper pairs, which subsequently Bose-Einstein-condense. For this reason, the condition required to make a fermionic condensate is called a BCS-BEC crossover regime. This is why I think it is tenuous to refer to the Fermionic condensate as a separate state of matter - it is more of a "crossover" as described.
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belu_bustu
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#17
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#17
The multiple dimensions arise from the incompatabilities of the various existing branches of string theory. String theorists traditionally use 1-dimensional strings or loops to model the various characteristics of all fundamental particles. However because the maths are slightly different for different particles/forces, current string theories have been adapted to make a universal "M-theory". As a very very rough analogy, we could say that from far away, a piece of string appears 1-dimensional. But as you look closer, you can see that it is in fact a 3-dimensional structure with various levels of complexity. This is also the case for M-theory, which describes traditional "strings" as complex membranes... (but only when you look at them closely!!)
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