The Student Room Group

Sqa Appeals 2022

The sqa has said:

'You should always discuss the discrepancy between your estimated grade and your final grade with your teachers/lecturers or centre staff to determine whether the estimated grade and supporting evidence support an appeals request.'

Does the 'discrepancy' mean that the appeal will only be accepted if there's a large difference in the grades between the evidence and your exam result? So if all my evidence is 90%+ and I fail the exam then I have a higher chance of getting an A as my final grade than if I got a B in the exam. If this is the case then does it not make sense to just fail all my exams where my evidence is really good as I'll end up with As anyways?
Original post by joe7898
The sqa has said:

'You should always discuss the discrepancy between your estimated grade and your final grade with your teachers/lecturers or centre staff to determine whether the estimated grade and supporting evidence support an appeals request.'

Does the 'discrepancy' mean that the appeal will only be accepted if there's a large difference in the grades between the evidence and your exam result? So if all my evidence is 90%+ and I fail the exam then I have a higher chance of getting an A as my final grade than if I got a B in the exam. If this is the case then does it not make sense to just fail all my exams where my evidence is really good as I'll end up with As anyways?

No......
They won't necessarily up you to A's if you fail the exam- I'd expect there to be some extenuating circumstances to support the huge discrepancy
They may take into account classwork exams, but they also don't necessarily know the conditions they were fully sat under (I think if anything they look at prelim grades the most because they are normally sat under exam conditions, but may be wrong about that)
I can't see why someone failing their final exam would get their marks put up to an A purely based on tests they sat throughout the year. It is possible they may consider increasing it- but I'd be surprised if it was as far as an A.

Again I may be completely wrong as it will be up to the SQA to decide how they do these things. I would also imagine the supporting evidence part is not just the tests/exams you did at school, but evidence as to why you did awful on the day (i.e. something happened just before you got to the exam or in the days leading up). I may be wrong though and it would be something to discuss with teachers

Just do your best in the exam. If you have been getting 90+% throughout the year then you should do fine in the real exam
Reply 2
Original post by AzureCeleste
No......
They won't necessarily up you to A's if you fail the exam- I'd expect there to be some extenuating circumstances to support the huge discrepancy
They may take into account classwork exams, but they also don't necessarily know the conditions they were fully sat under (I think if anything they look at prelim grades the most because they are normally sat under exam conditions, but may be wrong about that)
I can't see why someone failing their final exam would get their marks put up to an A purely based on tests they sat throughout the year. It is possible they may consider increasing it- but I'd be surprised if it was as far as an A.

Again I may be completely wrong as it will be up to the SQA to decide how they do these things. I would also imagine the supporting evidence part is not just the tests/exams you did at school, but evidence as to why you did awful on the day (i.e. something happened just before you got to the exam or in the days leading up). I may be wrong though and it would be something to discuss with teachers

Just do your best in the exam. If you have been getting 90+% throughout the year then you should do fine in the real exam


The sqa said this:
'If your appeal request is accepted, SQA will carry out a clerical check of your exam script and assignments. SQA appointees practising teachers and lecturers will also review the assessment evidence that your school, college or training provider sends to us to decide your final grade. The final grade might be different to the estimate that your school, college or training provider sends us. In this case, you will be awarded the higher of the two grades based on the two sources of evidence.'

Does that not mean for subjects that I have 90%+ in evidence for, there's very little chance that even after the review of my evidence, I won't get an A so since I'm awarded the higher of the 2 grades, I'll be given an A regardless of the exam result. Then my only issue is the appeal getting accepted which is why I'm concerned that it says we should discuss the 'discrepancy' between the grades as that sounds like the appeal will only be accepted if there's a large difference
Original post by joe7898
The sqa said this:
'If your appeal request is accepted, SQA will carry out a clerical check of your exam script and assignments. SQA appointees practising teachers and lecturers will also review the assessment evidence that your school, college or training provider sends to us to decide your final grade. The final grade might be different to the estimate that your school, college or training provider sends us. In this case, you will be awarded the higher of the two grades based on the two sources of evidence.'

Does that not mean for subjects that I have 90%+ in evidence for, there's very little chance that even after the review of my evidence, I won't get an A so since I'm awarded the higher of the 2 grades, I'll be given an A regardless of the exam result. Then my only issue is the appeal getting accepted which is why I'm concerned that it says we should discuss the 'discrepancy' between the grades as that sounds like the appeal will only be accepted if there's a large difference

The thing is, the reason I find it so hard to believe, is if that this were the true case, then every single person would just fail the exam intentionally. Many individuals do end up doing better in the exam, but many individuals are also disappointed each year for whatever reason. If they were happy with their predicted grades in class, then why would they try for the exam?
It also says if your appeal request is accepted- what are the requirements for this to be accepted in the first place? It sounds like if they accept it then they will look into the above
Reply 4
Original post by AzureCeleste
The thing is, the reason I find it so hard to believe, is if that this were the true case, then every single person would just fail the exam intentionally. Many individuals do end up doing better in the exam, but many individuals are also disappointed each year for whatever reason. If they were happy with their predicted grades in class, then why would they try for the exam?
It also says if your appeal request is accepted- what are the requirements for this to be accepted in the first place? It sounds like if they accept it then they will look into the above

Yeah, that's why I'm so confused by how it works. Like I don't see the point in me trying in any exams when I'm predicted 5 As. For the appeals being accepted, the only thing I could find that gave any indication on how appeals are accepted was the 'discrepancy' between estimates and final grades
Original post by joe7898
Yeah, that's why I'm so confused by how it works. Like I don't see the point in me trying in any exams when I'm predicted 5 As. For the appeals being accepted, the only thing I could find that gave any indication on how appeals are accepted was the 'discrepancy' between estimates and final grades

Tbh reading the document you can appeal if you get a B but predicted an A
I don't know how you failing would help with the appeal process- just do your best
Reply 6
Original post by AzureCeleste
Tbh reading the document you can appeal if you get a B but predicted an A
I don't know how you failing would help with the appeal process- just do your best

That's good to know, I think I'm just concerned that if I get a high B in my exam then I won't get an A since it's too close so my appeal won't get accepted but thanks

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