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Quiksilver
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#21
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#21
(Original post by trev)
I agree with you that 4 A-levels is an advantage in tariff points. The problem of tariff points is that, you can do any combinations to get the points. You can even hve a grade D and/or E in that will add up to the tariff points, and you still get in.
most offers with tariffs specify that these must be achieved from 3 a levels though
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trev
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#22
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#22
That's true, but some don't.
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billionnaire87
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#23
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#23
(Original post by joshdajoker)
Fishpaste that is debatable in my opinion

If I had the choice of getting AAA or AABB to get to my uni I would go for the AAA as your mind is less spread over more subjects.
i agree, do three, i am predicted AAA and have been accepted for both exeter and cardiff to study Law LLB 2005, also been accepted to aber and am doing scholarship, so stick to 3 matey!!
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trev
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#24
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#24
Yeah. There is no harm doing 4 though. Some uni's might include the number of A-levels you take!
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kellywood_5
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#25
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#25
(Original post by saiyamana)
English Lang and Psycholgoy are hard subjects!!! Dont know about media studies though. And they will be 'regarded as highly as maths etc' if the it is linked with the course they want to take, (eg, a journalist would require a high grade in English Lang, and wouldn't rate maths higher than this)
I was just using those 3 as examples because I don't take any of them, so I don't know how hard they are. I'm not saying I think they're easy or anything, just making a point that 4 A-levels with slightly lower grades in more respected subjects may be viewed as better than 3 A-levels with higher grades in subjects seen as 'soft', 'mickey mouse' etc.
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trev
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#26
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#26
I think they should have a quota on how many courses students should take, like in other countries.
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usa1981
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#27
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#27
If you were reqired to take a certian # depending o the # of GCSE's A* to B.

What do you think of this?:
A student that takes 9 GCSE's = would take 1 to 3 A-Levels.
A student that takes 10 GCSE's = would take 2 to 4 A-Levels.
A student that takes 11 GCSE's = would take 3 to 5 A-Levels.
A student that takes 12 GCSE's = would take 4 to 6 A-Levels.
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joesharp
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#28
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#28
(Original post by usa1981)
What do you think of this?:
A student that takes 9 GCSE's = would take 1 to 3 A-Levels.
A student that takes 10 GCSE's = would take 2 to 4 A-Levels.
A student that takes 11 GCSE's = would take 3 to 5 A-Levels.
A student that takes 12 GCSE's = would take 4 to 6 A-Levels.
Not really, many schools won't allow you to take more than 9 or 10 GCSE's (taking 11 or 12 is very rare). A better way would be how many A/A* grades someone got at GCSE, those with all A/A* tend to take more A-Levels.
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usa1981
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#29
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#29
(Original post by joesharp)
Not really, many schools won't allow you to take more than 9 or 10 GCSE's (taking 11 or 12 is very rare). A better way would be how many A/A* grades someone got at GCSE, those with all A/A* tend to take more A-Levels.
The stutent would choose how many A -Levels that they would take depending on what there grades at GCSE where. This they could asmany as six if they wanted too.
Then whatabout this?:
Students with 6 to 8 GCSE's (1 A*/A , with 2 to 4 B's and 1 or 2 C's) = the students would take 1 to 4 A-Levels.
Students with 6 to 8 (with 2 A*, 2 to4 A , 3 to 5 B's and 2 to 4 C's ) = the students would take 3 to 5 A-Levels.
Students with 6 to 8 (with 3 to 5 A*, 3 to 4 A, 2 to 4 B's and 2 to 4 C's)= the students would take 4 to 6 A-Levels.
Students with 8 to 10 (with 3 to 6 A*, 3 to 4 A, 2 to 4 B's and 2 to 4 C's ) = the students would take 5 or more A-levels.
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saiyamanadingdongbanana
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#30
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#30
I dont seem to fit into them patterns then 11 GCSE's, 2 A's 5 B's 4 C's :confused:

Maths, Physics (i decided to carry physics on into A2), Psychology, ICT, GS, Biology (AS) which is 5 A2 and 1 AS
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KingsComp
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#31
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#31
Hmm, I got mostly Bs in my GCSEs and only did 9 GCSEs. But I still did 4 A-Levels and got AABB (excluding GS). And I was only 2.5% off from an A in Chemistry as well!!

Also a friend of mine also did 9 GCSEs with only 1 A*, He got AAAA (excluding GS) and is now in cambridge studying engineering.

So forget what ppl are saying, if u work hard and are dedicated you can easily get good grades from 4 A-levels. GCSEs are by no way a true indication of your ability.
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trev
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#32
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#32
(Original post by usa1981)
Then whatabout this?:
Students with 6 to 8 GCSE's (1 A*) = the students would take 1 to 3 A-Levels.
Students with 6 to 8 (2 A*) = the students would take 2 to 4 A-Levels.
Students with 6 to 8 (3 to 5 A*)= the students would take 3 to 5 A-Levels.
Students with 8 to 10 (2 or 5 A*) = the students would take 4 or 5 A-levels.
Some good students with A*, A's, B's take 3 or 4 A-levels. Not 5 or more.
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Hash
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#33
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#33
(Original post by razzakakbar)
GCSEs are by no way a true indication of your ability.
I disagree with that. GCSEs are a reasonable indication of ability. The main point is if you don't do well in them it doesn't mean you can't improve later on by working hard (i.e. for A levels, university)
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kellywood_5
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#34
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#34
I did 9.5 GCSEs, but that was only because I chose to do AVCE ICT rather than applied GCSE or GNVQ, otherwise I could have done 11.5-13.5. Would, vocational GCSEs and GNVQs be counted as GCSEs, because that woud mean some people at my school got 16! How many A-levels would they have to do? :eek:

I did 9 GCSEs ignoring my short course or 10 if you count it as full, but I only got 1 A*, so does that mean I should only be allowed to do maximum 3 A-levels even though I also got 6 As and nothing below a B? I do 4 A-levels and am predicted As and Bs...

Oh, and as someone else said, it depends on your school how many GCSEs you're able to do, so why should someone be prevented from doing 4 or 5 A-levels just because their school only allowed them to take 9 or 10 GCSEs?
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BCHL85
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#35
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#35
Dont know about GCSE, but I think you can do 4/5 AL . It also depends on how your college arranges your timetable, your teachers and your ability. If you can have suitable timetable for yourself, I think you can do more than 3/4AL
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Elles
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#36
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at my 6th form your programme of study was based on GCSE results, not nerely numbers, i think the options were based on studying 8, so not to disadvantage though who couldn't do more.

it went from:

5 Cs - GNVQ recommendation
8A/A* - 5AS, 4A2 + AS&A2 GS

with various degrees in between.

anyway, just do the subjects you like.. i did 5 ASs, then carried 4 on to A2 & did A2 GS in a year.. mainly because i couldn't decide what to drop & liked all my subjects! :p:
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usa1981
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#37
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(Original post by kellywood_5)
I did 9.5 GCSEs, but that was only because I chose to do AVCE ICT rather than applied GCSE or GNVQ, otherwise I could have done 11.5-13.5. Would, vocational GCSEs and GNVQs be counted as GCSEs, because that woud mean some people at my school got 16! How many A-levels would they have to do? :eek:

I did 9 GCSEs ignoring my short course or 10 if you count it as full, but I only got 1 A*, so does that mean I should only be allowed to do maximum 3 A-levels even though I also got 6 As and nothing below a B? I do 4 A-levels and am predicted As and Bs...

Oh, and as someone else said, it depends on your school how many GCSEs you're able to do, so why should someone be prevented from doing 4 or 5 A-levels just because their school only allowed them to take 9 or 10 GCSEs?
No,you as any student would be able to take as many as 6 (maybe 8) and the short courses would be counted as full courses. Yes, the vocstional GCSE's and GNVQs would be counted the same. A student could choose to do as few as 4 and do as many as 8. I the students school only let them take 9 or 10 A-Levels they could take up 6 A-levels (mabe even 8).
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usa1981
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#38
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(Original post by Elles)
at my 6th form your programme of study was based on GCSE results, not nerely numbers, i think the options were based on studying 8, so not to disadvantage though who couldn't do more.

it went from:

5 Cs - GNVQ recommendation
8A/A* - 5AS, 4A2 + AS&A2 GS

with various degrees in between.

anyway, just do the subjects you like.. i did 5 ASs, then carried 4 on to A2 & did A2 GS in a year.. mainly because i couldn't decide what to drop & liked all my subjects! :p:
I am an American there for I never took GCSE's or A- Levels. All I was saying is that I believe that the number of A-Levels should be connected to the # of GCSE's that the Student took. Of course here in the state students take 6 to 8 subjects a day through out the 12 years of school. I know when students in England start school and they have through year 11 when they take the GCSE's and that if you want to attened University you need the A-levels until year 13.
In the area that I live in students take 6 subjects all way through school. Why should a student thathas taken 10 sbujects to the GCSE Level only take 3 subjects to A-levels? It would a lot more sense to me to more of the subjects to A-levels.
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Elles
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#39
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(Original post by usa1981)
I am an American there for I never took GCSE's or A- Levels. All I was saying is that I believe that the number of A-Levels should be connected to the # of GCSE's that the Student took.
fair enough.. perhaps though (& i mean this in the nicest possible way ) you're not really qualified to comment?

because you don't know first hand how the school system here will exert quite an influence on the number of GCSEs you can take. at my school it was a maximum of 9, or 10 if you took statistics & no more were possible due to the timetable. at other places, students commonly did 12/13.

that hardly implies anything about the ability of the students at 2 types of school for higher level study, just the constraints in their education so far.

Pupil X - 12Cs
Pupil Y - 8A*s

which looks outwardly more capable to build on their existing level of specific knowledge & continue the 3/4/5 subjects of their choosing onto a higher level? remember, we don't do 6 or so subjects per day, like you guys.. we have considerably more specialisation at 16 - so it's arguable your results in GCSEs subjects you don't continue at A2 are irrelevant.


under your system i would have taken '2 to 4 A-Levels'.

i actually took 5.5 (considering AS as 1/2 an A level) & an AEA. & considering i got top grades in all of them, i hardly think i was overstretched. :p:
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annabellewalter
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#40
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#40
I think it is always important to rememeber that many schools do not give the opportunity to do 4A2 due to restriction of resources and timetabling issues. Therefore it is unfair to compare.

Everyone has said that you only actually NEED 3 but if you are considering applying for a good red brick uni - most of the time tariff points aren't relevant as they ask for a triple grade. Uni's don't ask for 360, they ask for AAA.

The other thing to consider is that your 4th may detract from the grades you get in your three, unless you predicted AAA and there is no question about it - why aren't you trying your hardest to get the best you can in the three, the 4th a level is really for people who experience no challenge with gaining AAAA.

Aside from grades, perhaps you could invest the time more widely - you want to show the uni you are more than a handful of grades.....get out and do some community service, learn something new, read widely, get involved with something non academic.....you want to say 'you know I'm bright...now let me show you what else i have up my sleeve'

And there is more to life than univeristy....why not do something with the time that will develop you rather than your UCAS?
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