JaylinKou
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Hi.

I have got offers for integrated masters physics from UCL, Edinburgh, Manchester and Durham. I cannot decide which university I want to go to. I have visited all unis and I love these places, so it makes it even harder to choose which one to go for. I plan on doing postgraduate degrees elsewhere and go into research. Any suggestions on which one of them is more academically challenging (I might switch to theoretical physics) and will set me up for a research career in physics? Which one of these unis have a better relationship with other universities in the UK for research in theoretical physics?

I would really appreciate it.
Thank you.
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physgradstudent
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(Original post by JaylinKou)
Hi.

I have got offers for integrated masters physics from UCL, Edinburgh, Manchester and Durham. I cannot decide which university I want to go to. I have visited all unis and I love these places, so it makes it even harder to choose which one to go for. I plan on doing postgraduate degrees elsewhere and go into research. Any suggestions on which one of them is more academically challenging (I might switch to theoretical physics) and will set me up for a research career in physics? Which one of these unis have a better relationship with other universities in the UK for research in theoretical physics?

I would really appreciate it.
Thank you.
Hey,

Congratulations on all your offers. To be honest all of these Universities are well regarded for physics. There will be little difference in how academically challenging the different courses are. All of the courses will set you up well for a research career in Physics, when you apply for a research career no one will care about the relative perceived qualities or difficulties of the courses between those different universities. Instead, they will care about what marks you did and what extra research you gained during your undergraduate degree. You can gain high marks and research experience at any of the universities you have listed. There is no 'best' university for theoretical physics so you should try and consider other factors when making your decision.

If you are particularly interested in the academics have a look at what modules are available in each year of the course. Also have a look at the research areas of each university, does one university have a lot of research in an area that you are more interested in?

To be honest though I think the way to make the decision in your case is which university experience would you most like. The universities you have listed all have very different student experiences: one is in London, one is in Durham which is collegiate, one is in Manchester and one is in Scotland. Where is your gut saying that you'd most like to live?
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