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Alcohol5%
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Could someone tell me the differences e.g. pros and cons of Collegiate vs. Campus vs. Non campus unis?

Also, what are civic and "red brick" universities....?

Cheers
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AT82
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(Original post by Alcohol5%)
Could someone tell me the differences e.g. pros and cons of Collegiate vs. Campus vs. Non campus unis?

Also, what are civic and "red brick" universities....?

Cheers
There are some good links for this, PQ knows them.

Anyway:

Civic - I tink it places like Oxbridge and I think the victorian universities are also including in this such as Manchester, Birmingham and Liverpool

Redbrick is any university established before 1992 and includes a wide range of universities such as Warrick, Lancaster and Salford.

Campus universities tend to be in self contained large campuses with all the facilities on say a park. City universities tend to be lots of different building scatered around a certain area of a city.
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Chicken
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(Original post by amazingtrade)
There are some good links for this, PQ knows them.

Anyway:

Civic - I tink it places like Oxbridge and I think the victorian universities are also including in this such as Manchester, Birmingham and Liverpool

Redbrick is any university established before 1992 and includes a wide range of universities such as Warrick, Lancaster and Salford.

Campus universities tend to be in self contained large campuses with all the facilities on say a park. City universities tend to be lots of different building scatered around a certain area of a city.
Redbrick are NOT 'new' universities - a Redbrick uni tends to be Victorian - Birmingham is an excellent example of a redbrick uni.

City universities are ones that have no main campus, and are spread out over a city (dur) such as Bristol.

Campus uni's are where everything is based on campus - Loughborough, UEA, Warwick are examples.

Collegiate uni's - Oxford, Cambridge and Durham, where you are based in colleges mixed with students from different courses and each college has its own social events and stuff.

I'm not sure what's meant by civic uni's though.
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john williams
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(Original post by amazingtrade)
Redbrick is any university established before 1992 and includes a wide range of universities such as Warrick, Lancaster and Salford.
I thought Redbrick uni's were a list of all the decent ones, so why is Salford on it?
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AT82
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(Original post by john williams)
I thought Redbrick uni's were a list of all the decent ones, so why is Salford on it?
see below.
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AT82
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According to this they refer to term New Universities for the following, these are what I thought were redbrick, and civic ones older than redbrick.

The ‘new’ universities are The University of Sussex (1961); The University of Essex (1961); The University of Keele (1962); The University of York (1963); The University of East Anglia (1964); The University of Kent at Canterbury (1964); The University of Lancaster (1964); The University of Warwick (1965); The University of Stirling (1967) and The University of Ulster (1984).

then there is new university (technological)

The technological universities are The University of Aston in Birmingham (now Aston University); Bath University of Technology; The University of Bradford; Brunel University (Uxbridge, Middlesex); City University (London); Heriot-Watt University (Edinburgh); Loughborough University of Technology; The University of Salford; The University of Strathclyde (Glasgow); The University of Surrey (Guildford).

It is all highly confusing, different sites say different thinks, this site classes modern universities as victorian ones for example

http://www.unescobkk.org/education/a...book/HB_UK.htm
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Alcohol5%
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What are the good points to all these universities though?

I'm thinking on the more social side rather than academic.
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AT82
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(Original post by Alcohol5%)
What are the good points to all these universities though?

I'm thinking on the more social side rather than academic.
I don't think it really matters, location matters more than anything, city universities probably have better night life than campus universities but then you get campus universities in the city like mine. if you want some where with lots of clubs and bars then cities will be better.
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Muse
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(Original post by amazingtrade)
Redbrick is any university established before 1992 and includes a wide range of universities such as Warrick, Lancaster and Salford.
From various sources:


Red Brick is a name given originally to the six civic British universities that were founded in the industrial cities of England in the Victorian era and achieved university status before World War II

The six Civic Universities are:

University of Birmingham
University of Bristol
University of Leeds
University of Liverpool
University of Manchester
University of Sheffield

Red Brick is a name applied to a category of civic British universities that were founded mainly in the 19th and early 20th centuries. The term 'Red Brick' was first coined by a professor of music at the University of Liverpool to describe these civic universities. His reference was inspired by the fact that The Victoria Building at the University of Liverpool (which was designed by Alfred Waterhouse and completed in 1892) is built from a distinctive red pressed brick, with terracotta decorative dressings. The University of Liverpool is therefore the 'original' 'Red Brick' University.
Red brick universities include:

University College London
University of Birmingham
University of Bristol
University of Exeter
University of Leeds
University of Liverpool
University of Manchester
University of Reading[?]
University of Sheffield[?]
University of Southampton
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Chicken
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Redbricks are definitely universities such as Birmingham and Leeds.

Edit: See Timeofyourlife's post above ^
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AT82
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(Original post by timeofyourlife)
From various sources:


Red Brick is a name given originally to the six civic British universities that were founded in the industrial cities of England in the Victorian era and achieved university status before World War II

The six Civic Universities are:

University of Birmingham
University of Bristol
University of Leeds
University of Liverpool
University of Manchester
University of Sheffield

Red Brick is a name applied to a category of civic British universities that were founded mainly in the 19th and early 20th centuries. The term 'Red Brick' was first coined by a professor of music at the University of Liverpool to describe these civic universities. His reference was inspired by the fact that The Victoria Building at the University of Liverpool (which was designed by Alfred Waterhouse and completed in 1892) is built from a distinctive red pressed brick, with terracotta decorative dressings. The University of Liverpool is therefore the 'original' 'Red Brick' University.
Red brick universities include:

University College London
University of Birmingham
University of Bristol
University of Exeter
University of Leeds
University of Liverpool
University of Manchester
University of Reading[?]
University of Sheffield[?]
University of Southampton

So basicaly as a rough guide anything formed before the second world war is rebbrick, anything formed before 1992 is a "New University" and anything after 1992 is an ex poly or 1992 university? I think there also needs to be a new one for places like Bolton, Northampton that are not yet universities, but were not Polys, so they should perhaps come under the Millenium universities section or somthing
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Chicken
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(Original post by amazingtrade)
So basicaly as a rough guide anything formed before the second world war is rebbrick, anything formed before 1992 is a "New University" and anything after 1992 is an ex poly or 1992 university? I think there also needs to be a new one for places like Bolton, Northampton that are not yet universities, but were not Polys, so they should perhaps come under the Millenium universities section or somthing
There was a group of universities built in the 60's, which are referred to as 'The 60's uni's' - Loughborough, Warwick, UEA to name a few. They're not 'new' universities though.
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AT82
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(Original post by Chicken)
There was a group of universities built in the 60's, which are referred to as 'The 60's uni's' - Loughborough, Warwick, UEA to name a few. They're not 'new' universities though.
I wouldn't have classed them as such either, but that site I listed above did :confused: I always thought new universities was anything after 1992.

This basicalt confirms what you're saying

http://www.universityoptions.co.uk/parents/8/
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*Hythlodaeus*
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The advantages of the system are complicated. If you put Oxbridge at the top of the pile and then say in which order the 'respectability' and 'employability' that the university MIGHT give you, it doesn't always follow the pattern you might expect in terms of age. But as a rough guide I would suggest it goes like this:

Oxbridge
Red Brick
certain 60s unis
New unis
former polytechnics

so if you want to go to a good uni (academically at least) most red bricks will provide that. However you then have to include some exceptions to this rule such as Warwick, a 60s uni with an outstanding rep often higher than a lot of the red bricks at the mo.

And Liverpool is the original red brick- I go past there everyday and can confirm that the bricks are red (ish).
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Alcohol5%
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I'm sorry *Hythlodaeus* but if anything happens, I hope that we (Liverpool) end up higher in the Premiership than Everton this season... yet again
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material breach
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(Original post by timeofyourlife)
University of Manchester
technically the university of manchester was founded in 2004
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Alcohol5%
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From UMIST and the university of manchester which were both formed much earlier? Am I right?
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material breach
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yeah http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manchester_University
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DenverDiva
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(Original post by *Hythlodaeus*)
The advantages of the system are complicated. If you put Oxbridge at the top of the pile and then say in which order the 'respectability' and 'employability' that the university MIGHT give you, it doesn't always follow the pattern you might expect in terms of age. But as a rough guide I would suggest it goes like this:

Oxbridge
Red Brick
certain 60s unis
New unis
former polytechnics

so if you want to go to a good uni (academically at least) most red bricks will provide that. However you then have to include some exceptions to this rule such as Warwick, a 60s uni with an outstanding rep often higher than a lot of the red bricks at the mo.

And Liverpool is the original red brick- I go past there everyday and can confirm that the bricks are red (ish).

Don't forget the 4 Ancients.
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Chrism
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(Original post by Alcohol5%)
From UMIST and the university of manchester which were both formed much earlier? Am I right?
UMIST and the Victoria University of Manchester.[/pedantry]
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