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Alcohol5%
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#21
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#21
(Original post by DenverDiva)
Don't forget the 4 Ancients.
What are the four ancients? Oxford, Cambridge, St Andrews and Durham or something?
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trev
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#22
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#22
The wikipedia website don't give all the uni facts.
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trev
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#23
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#23
Shouldn't have said facts. The wikipedia website don't have information about all the uni's. For example, I searched for the university of lincoln. They don't even have it.
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trev
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#24
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#24
Ok then. Maybe I didn't spell it right or something. I'm assuming wikipeida has information for all the uni's in the UK.
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randdom
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#25
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#25
(Original post by *Hythlodaeus*)
The advantages of the system are complicated. If you put Oxbridge at the top of the pile and then say in which order the 'respectability' and 'employability' that the university MIGHT give you, it doesn't always follow the pattern you might expect in terms of age. But as a rough guide I would suggest it goes like this:

Oxbridge
Red Brick
certain 60s unis
New unis
former polytechnics

so if you want to go to a good uni (academically at least) most red bricks will provide that. However you then have to include some exceptions to this rule such as Warwick, a 60s uni with an outstanding rep often higher than a lot of the red bricks at the mo.

And Liverpool is the original red brick- I go past there everyday and can confirm that the bricks are red (ish).
I think sussex is another 60's university which is good too. Obviously I am a bit biased but it came into the recent list of the top 50 unis in the world
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*Hythlodaeus*
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#26
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#26
(Original post by randdom)
I think sussex is another 60's university which is good too. Obviously I am a bit biased but it came into the recent list of the top 50 unis in the world
Yes I think it is getting a good reputation- certainly when you have been through the application process. What I mean is, there are loads of unis and most people will only have heard of a few but when you start to research where you want to go and keep seeing these lists, names of unis pop up that you never really thought about before, or might not have even heard of. I'm having that problem at the moment. None of my friends have never heard of LSE. Sad reality is, Oxbridge is the one everyone has heard of- and even then everyone kept saying to me 'did you get into oxford?' when I applied for cambridge and they knew that.

(Original post by DenverDiva)
Don't forget the 4 Ancients.
I included oxbridge as that, but yes Durham is in there too. What's the other one?

(Original post by Alcohol5%)
I'm sorry *Hythlodaeus* but if anything happens, I hope that we (Liverpool) end up higher in the Premiership than Everton this season... yet again
ha ha...you wish No i think Everton may slip up towards the end. Obviously I hope they don't but lets just say that our past record since the Premiership was formed means that achieving a top half finish deserves more than celebrations.
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AT82
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#27
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#27
So what would Salford come under because its not a modern university, its not a redbrick, its not a civic university nor is it in the Russel League.
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Chicken
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#28
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#28
I'd just call it a campus uni.
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LostRiot
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#29
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#29
(Original post by timeofyourlife)
From various sources:


Red Brick is a name given originally to the six civic British universities that were founded in the industrial cities of England in the Victorian era and achieved university status before World War II

The six Civic Universities are:

University of Birmingham
University of Bristol
University of Leeds
University of Liverpool
University of Manchester
University of Sheffield

Red Brick is a name applied to a category of civic British universities that were founded mainly in the 19th and early 20th centuries. The term 'Red Brick' was first coined by a professor of music at the University of Liverpool to describe these civic universities. His reference was inspired by the fact that The Victoria Building at the University of Liverpool (which was designed by Alfred Waterhouse and completed in 1892) is built from a distinctive red pressed brick, with terracotta decorative dressings. The University of Liverpool is therefore the 'original' 'Red Brick' University.
Red brick universities include:

University College London
University of Birmingham
University of Bristol
University of Exeter
University of Leeds
University of Liverpool
University of Manchester
University of Reading[?]
University of Sheffield[?]
University of Southampton

sheffield is a red brick uni.
(i have no idea what that implies, but all the builds are red brick)
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Chrism
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#30
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#30
(Original post by *Hythlodaeus*)
I included oxbridge as that, but yes Durham is in there too. What's the other one?
Oxbridge and Durham aren't any of the 4 ancients (though they are ancient universities). The specific 4 ancients are Aberdeen, Edinburgh, Glasgow, and St. Andrews.
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*Hythlodaeus*
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#31
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#31
(Original post by Chrism)
Oxbridge and Durham aren't any of the 4 ancients (though they are ancient universities). The specific 4 ancients are Aberdeen, Edinburgh, Glasgow, and St. Andrews.
Just out of interest how are the four Scottish unis known as the ancients, but those even older (which is what I assume ancient is all about?) are not considered part of that group?

This is all getting a little tedious now don't we think!?
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DenverDiva
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#32
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#32
(Original post by *Hythlodaeus*)
Just out of interest how are the four Scottish unis known as the ancients, but those even older (which is what I assume ancient is all about?) are not considered part of that group?

This is all getting a little tedious now don't we think!?
The Scottish quartet are known as the 4 Ancients because they were established long before the Scottish King assumed the English Crown: at that time Oxford and Cambridge were in a different (and often unfriendly) country. Anyone who believes that multi-culturalism began with the Windrush has no idea of British history!
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Masonne
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#33
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#33
(Original post by Chicken)
City universities are ones that have no main campus, and are spread out over a city (dur) such as Bristol.
not stricly true, some city universities are on a city campus and centralised on one site.
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AT82
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#34
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#34
(Original post by Masonne)
not stricly true, some city universities are on a city campus and centralised on one site.
Yep Salford is a classic example, athough it has buidlings spread the main campus is all self contained i.e not on public roads.
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Chicken
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#35
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#35
(Original post by Masonne)
not stricly true, some city universities are on a city campus and centralised on one site.
Yeah and then they are called campus uni's rather than city uni's.
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madziakowalski
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#36
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#36
Hey, Sean Connery-you a big bond fan?
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~Sam~
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#37
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#37
(Original post by Chicken)
Yeah and then they are called campus uni's rather than city uni's.
I think he means like Cardiff. It's not on a campus, but all the academic buildings are down one round so it might as well be
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treff
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#38
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#38
(Original post by AT82)
Redbrick is any university established before 1992 and includes a wide range of universities such as Warrick, Lancaster and Salford.
Surely you meant 1892? Because if you meant 1992, that excludes Warwick, Lancaster and Salford.
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AT82
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#39
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#39
(Original post by treff)
Surely you meant 1892? Because if you meant 1992, that excludes Warwick, Lancaster and Salford.
I don't follow, anyway what I said was wrong, technicaly Warick, Lancaster and Salford aren't red brick. I guess they are probably known as 'Traditional" or 1960's universities or somthing.

I suppose Salford could be classed as a technical university, because it used to be a technical college and was established in 1896, I am not sure about the history of Lancaster. I know Warick was pretty much setup from scratch in the 1960's with the aim to rival Oxbridge.
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swallows
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#40
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#40
I know Warick was pretty much setup from scratch in the 1960's with the aim to rival Oxbridge.
And it's succeeding. Go Warwick.
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