The Student Room Group

Durham or King's college for investment banking?

Hi there, I wanted to do pure economics to get into investment banking and I've gotten a generous offer from Durham to do pure economics of ABB rather than A*AA. King's on the other hand have given me an unconditional offer for international development instead of pure econ. I am very unsure who I should choose.
The pros of Durham are:

Doing the degree I want to do
Nice offer
Networking with students is good, as you're forced to get to know others with colleges
Very well respected nationally, but King's slightly beats it internationally

Cons of Durham:

In Durham, not London, so internships/work experience is harder to get
I need accommodation for 3 years plus travel from and to London (Where I live)

Pros of King's:

In London, the hot spot for banking
Unconditional offer
Very well respected uni
Can live at home for 2nd and 3rd year saving between £10-20,000

Cons of King's:

Not the degree I wanted to do

Scroll to see replies

the econ degree for ib is seemingly less and less relevant, but its definitely better than international development

networking in london or in a college is whatever; you make friends wherever you go and i don't think students benefit by being in london by much especially because employers don't discriminate on which city their applicants come from. and you can move back home if you get one anyway

you'd could live in durham for 2 years for <£10k/year no problem

both universities are good but durham econ sounds better than kings politics imo
I have the same situation, got an unconditional offer for ID instead of econ. asking to change courses and ill firm kings, hopefully that works out.
Reply 3
Original post by albayati
I have the same situation, got an unconditional offer for ID instead of econ. asking to change courses and ill firm kings, hopefully that works out.

I doubt they'll let us change. We've been rejected from econ flat out.
Original post by Abzdot
I doubt they'll let us change. We've been rejected from econ flat out.

I don't have to do econ, any stem degree would work really
Reply 5
Original post by albayati
I don't have to do econ, any stem degree would work really

Fair enough! I saw Mathematics with management and finance still available on ucas extra I believe
Original post by Abzdot
Fair enough! I saw Mathematics with management and finance still available on ucas extra I believe

Yeah. Don't beat yourself up man, you've got very nice offers. I'm in the same boat, loads of ppl are. you'll be ok. People on TSR like to be really over competitive about this type of stuff, just don't compare yourself. You've got very good offers at very good unis, not many can say that.
(edited 1 year ago)
Reply 7
Original post by HoldThisL
the econ degree for ib is seemingly less and less relevant, but its definitely better than international development

networking in london or in a college is whatever; you make friends wherever you go and i don't think students benefit by being in london by much especially because employers don't discriminate on which city their applicants come from. and you can move back home if you get one anyway

you'd could live in durham for 2 years for <£10k/year no problem

both universities are good but durham econ sounds better than kings politics imo

I agree with you on econ being a better degree over international development.
I'm concerned about the difficulty of getting internships and work experience as that is very important to get in.
You can live in Durham for less than 10k a year, but if I take King's, I would save between 10-20k in pocket as I can live from home
Reply 8
Original post by albayati
Yeah. Don't beat yourself up man, you've got very nice offers. I'm in the same boat, loads of ppl are. you'll be ok. People on TSR like to be really over competitive about this type of stuff, just don't compare yourself. You've got very good offers at very good unis, not many can say that.

Thank you! That makes me feel much better hearing that :smile:
Reply 9
Networking in UK not really needed imo, and don't think being in London helps particularly.

So I wouldn't count difficulty with internships at Durham as a con (I think it will be very similar).

Basically comes down to whether the cost of accom is worth it for you for the preferred degree / general experience.
Imagine you have figured already but likely to be a pretty different student experience between the two
Original post by Abzdot
Thank you! That makes me feel much better hearing that :smile:

Also just another note, people who study economics and get top IB jobs don't even use their degree, it's learnt all on the job. You really don't need to just do economics or finance.
Original post by Abzdot
I'm concerned about the difficulty of getting internships and work experience as that is very important to get in.
You can live in Durham for less than 10k a year, but if I take King's, I would save between 10-20k in pocket as I can live from home

- don't be, seriously
- and yes, what i meant to say was you probably wont save as much as 20k/could live for less than that in durham, but the saving is highly relevant because its money
Reply 12
Original post by JPowWow
Networking in UK not really needed imo, and don't think being in London helps particularly.

So I wouldn't count difficulty with internships at Durham as a con (I think it will be very similar).

Basically comes down to whether the cost of accom is worth it for you for the preferred degree / general experience.
Imagine you have figured already but likely to be a pretty different student experience between the two

I thought networking would be helpful, just knowing the right people can be amazing.
Why do you think it's equally difficult to get work experience from both unis?
potentially 20k saving is substantial and I'll just have to think about it
The student experience in London would be massively better than Durham I believe.

Original post by HoldThisL
- don't be, seriously
- and yes, what i meant to say was you probably wont save as much as 20k/could live for less than that in durham, but the saving is highly relevant because its money

Fair enough

Ultimately, if you were in my shoes, what would you do?
Reply 13
Original post by albayati
Also just another note, people who study economics and get top IB jobs don't even use their degree, it's learnt all on the job. You really don't need to just do economics or finance.

It's true, I haven't done much research about ID just yet, but I don't know what combination would be better. King's with a worse degree, or Durham with a better degree. I would like to stay in London if possible
Original post by Abzdot
It's true, I haven't done much research about ID just yet, but I don't know what combination would be better. King's with a worse degree, or Durham with a better degree. I would like to stay in London if possible

Ill be honest, university is probably gonna be one of the best times of your life. I'm likely to go for KCL, i just hope i can switch to another course with vacancies and i'm definitely going there. Ultimately its your choice, ask around and research. Don't rush your decision
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by Abzdot
I thought networking would be helpful, just knowing the right people can be amazing.
Why do you think it's equally difficult to get work experience from both unis?
potentially 20k saving is substantial and I'll just have to think about it
The student experience in London would be massively better than Durham I believe.


Fair enough

Ultimately, if you were in my shoes, what would you do?


Yeah networking can definitely be helpful. However, it doesn't help particularly in the process as there's not much someone can do to aid your application directly , its more about the firm specific knowledge etc. they can give you.

I think its equally difficult because its a very competitive process and both semi- targets. Ultimately it will be your extra curriculars and interview performance that get you the role or not.

Re student experience I basically meant college style with everyone close (and classic Durham stereotypes) vs London where likely to be a lot more going on but maybe more spread out
Original post by JPowWow
Yeah networking can definitely be helpful. However, it doesn't help particularly in the process as there's not much someone can do to aid your application directly , its more about the firm specific knowledge etc. they can give you.

I think its equally difficult because its a very competitive process and both semi- targets. Ultimately it will be your extra curriculars and interview performance that get you the role or not.

Re student experience I basically meant college style with everyone close (and classic Durham stereotypes) vs London where likely to be a lot more going on but maybe more spread out

will studying international development BA be sufficient for getting an IB job?
(edited 1 year ago)
Reply 17
Original post by albayati
will studying international development BA be sufficient for getting an IB job?

Exactly what I want to know, if I can get away with it then I’ll just firm kings, it has a better reputation over durham in IB.
Original post by Abzdot
Exactly what I want to know, if I can get away with it then I’ll just firm kings, it has a better reputation over durham in IB.

Same here man lol.
Original post by Abzdot
I thought networking would be helpful, just knowing the right people can be amazing.
Why do you think it's equally difficult to get work experience from both unis?
potentially 20k saving is substantial and I'll just have to think about it
The student experience in London would be massively better than Durham I believe.


Fair enough

Ultimately, if you were in my shoes, what would you do?


durham

the money doesn't matter too much

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